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Mammoth Sean
05-10-2009, 10:05 PM
I'm sure this has been discussed many times, but would like to learn more about what other breweries do.

What policies do you have for allowing employees to have a beer during the day, either during lunch hour (off the clock) or at the end of long bottling day (maybe still on the clock)? Do you have policy's about quantity and/or when beer can be consumed? I don't want to discourage discussions about beers in general or sampling/tasting of our own beers, but what is the difference if emplyees are helping themselves to the taps? I know what my general liability insurance would say...

We are a small micro at only 4000 bbls and I want it to be an unspoken acknowledgment with co-workers that it is ok as long as it doesn't get out of control, but thinking more and more that a written policy needs to be put in place.

tarmadilo
05-10-2009, 10:36 PM
The policy at pretty much every brewery I've worked for was that we were allowed to drink/sample beer during our shifts, and encouraged to practice extreme moderation, for both safety and productivity reasons.

I personally found out very quickly that I was a lot more effective if I waited until close to the end of my shift before even considering drinking any beer...

I don't think you'd be out of line to specify either waiting until the end of a shift, or perhaps specific small amounts (a 4 oz taster cup, perhaps?) during a shift...

Tim

Larry Doyle
05-11-2009, 06:05 PM
Recommend no beer during working hours and allow a strict max. of 24 oz. after work. Some people can handle drinking during working hours but others definitely can't. With employees drinking on the job you run into problems with safety, productivity and attitude as well as your liability when drunken employees hit the road.

You're a hell of a boss when you allow a liberal drinking policy but when it hits the fan its your ass that has the target drawn on it.

beerking1
05-12-2009, 07:15 AM
Even as a homebrewer, I will not drink during the brew day until I have the chiller running. The only exception is a single brew with lunch.

irishsnake
05-12-2009, 11:46 AM
I like to assume that I am managing sensible adults unless/until I am proven wrong.

wiredgourmet
05-12-2009, 01:17 PM
I like to assume that I am managing sensible adults unless/until I am proven wrong.

Bingo. I'm a brewer, not a social worker. That said, I would sack anyone who can't handle their drink in a heartbeat. There are, obviously, people who are unsuited for work in an alcohol-related business. Blow 'em out and don't give it a second thought.

There is real value in keeping the "liquor cabinet" open. The ability to enjoy a product that you helped to make is an opportunity to take pride in your work, and to evaluate & critique, and so contribute toward improving the overall process.

If you've got drunks lazing about, you need a better staff, not more regulations.

Larry Doyle
05-12-2009, 02:21 PM
I, too, liked to assume I was managing sensible adults. How wrong I was!

Jephro
05-12-2009, 02:56 PM
A previous brewery i worked for (i will not name) had some issues. I actually got the job because a former brewer got drunk and hurt himself pretty severely. After i left the other brewer i worked with caused some serious problems after work. All employee's drinking rights were suspended after that, how would you like to brew beer you cannot even drink at all... Anyway i later heard they were forcing all brewers to submit to a brethelyzer test after work. Where i work now we are allowed to sample for QC and training and limited to 3 drinks after work off the clock. -Good Idea IMHO!!

From a legal standpoint i would say "necessary sampling only" on the clock. If you look the other way and let responsible people do as they will, you should still have a legal foot to stand on in the case of abuse leading to diciplinary action, or a potential lawsuit if someone gets hurt and trys to hold you liable.
- In other words, Put Something In Writing!! Maybe even have them sign it and put it in thier file

Larry Doyle
05-12-2009, 04:09 PM
If you set a policy so you are "covered" and look the other way and do not enforce it you are still liable and asking for a problem. You will be 'the world's greatest boss or employeer' when things are going good. But when things head south, your unenforced policy will be jammed up your hindquarters by your grateful, appreciative employees.

matthendry
05-13-2009, 09:46 PM
Don't let them drink on the job unless its for QC or Sensory Analysis but do allow them to take some beer home and maybe two drinks after work/at the very end of the shift on packaging days if your employees all drive to work . If you have function or beer tasting please try and provide transport home for all employees if possible .

LokeBrewSF
05-22-2009, 04:00 PM
I like to assume that I am managing sensible adults unless/until I am proven wrong.

I agree, one should be able to tell if an employee or potential employee is sensible during the interview. Brewery workers should be able to enjoy the fruits of their labor, after their shift, without a manager breathing down their neck. Let them know they can't get drunk at work (don't get out of control) or they are canned, and enforce this with no tolerance.

Pretty much exactly what wiredgourmet said.


Bingo. I'm a brewer, not a social worker. That said, I would sack anyone who can't handle their drink in a heartbeat. There are, obviously, people who are unsuited for work in an alcohol-related business. Blow 'em out and don't give it a second thought.

hophead82
07-29-2009, 07:43 PM
as a new assistant brewer i find it is necessary to taste beer along all stages from fermentation to bright tank albeit in small quantities. I find this helps refine the pallet to identify tastes and proper carbonation levels.

Brew Chef
06-08-2010, 11:55 PM
Our brewer is a strange bird, he rarely touches the stuff but he makes great beer. We'll go out though and try as many new beers as we can with a designated driver.

GlacierBrewing
06-09-2010, 07:32 AM
All new hires are required to read and acknowledge understanding by signature our employee handbook which states at the end of a shift, the employee may have a comped-shift beer: one. After that, off the clock, they are like any other customer in our tasting room. Any consumption that occurs during a work shift is for reasons of QA/QC. Write down a policy, have everyone read and sign it. And enforce it. Whoever has the most paperwork, wins!

Prost!
Dave

kai
06-09-2010, 08:21 AM
Whoever has the most paperwork, wins!

Quoting for emphasis.

Sulfur
06-09-2010, 11:48 AM
In Germany there's a quote

"Wer schreibt, der bleibt"

i.e. He who writes - stays

jcbolling
03-16-2011, 02:34 PM
I have worked at three different breweries and only one "allowed" a few to "drink" on the clock. This was done three times a week with the brewer, and the owner during tasting evaluations. These evaluations were done at the end of the day and generally took the last half hour of our shift. During this time myself, cellar manager, head brewer and owner would sample all brew in various stages of production as well as those ready for packaging and those packaged during the time since the last tasting. We were also given a case of beer each week to take home and allowed Five pints a week at the tasting room. Most of the employees that drank their five pints a week handled themselves well and had zero problems, a few drank the five free ones and would buy more and get out of hand on occasion....

From my experience in the F&B industry most employees respect boundries whether spoken or not and some screw it up for everyone else...

My suggestion is to do what your heart feels best and CYA for any mishaps that may occur....Good Luck

Eric Brewer
03-16-2011, 07:56 PM
Very recently, I over-imbibed at a beer fest, and felt like merde about it the next day.

I feel it is my duty to lead by example. And that day, I didn't. Never again.

Moonlight
03-17-2011, 10:45 AM
as a new assistant brewer i find it is necessary to taste beer along all stages from fermentation to bright tank albeit in small quantities. I find this helps refine the palate to identify tastes and proper carbonation levels.

I am in complete agreement with this thought!

hophead82
04-01-2011, 11:33 AM
I am in complete agreement with this thought!

You must be the gentleman that came all the way to Wisconsin for a wastewater seminar?

Lagergnome
12-02-2011, 12:44 PM
Bingo. I'm a brewer, not a social worker. That said, I would sack anyone who can't handle their drink in a heartbeat. There are, obviously, people who are unsuited for work in an alcohol-related business. Blow 'em out and don't give it a second thought.

There is real value in keeping the "liquor cabinet" open. The ability to enjoy a product that you helped to make is an opportunity to take pride in your work, and to evaluate & critique, and so contribute toward improving the overall process.

If you've got drunks lazing about, you need a better staff, not more regulations.

Well stated!

barleywhiner
12-10-2011, 10:08 AM
I used to have a beer at lunch. Did not take long to realize that was a bad idea. Not immediately after, but once I got to brewhouse CIP, man was I ready to go home.

So, I instated a policy for myself and everyone that works for me that once the beer is in the fermenter, the glycol temps are set, the CIPs are over...Your putting away clamps, gaskets and hoses and a squeegy is in your hands, then you can have a beer.

Brewers are allowed 2x 5 gallon kegs/month to take home with them. They, along with ALL of my staff, are allowed no more than 2 beers/day at our bar or at ANY other local brewery or affiliated establishment. We are professionals and I expect my staff to behave as such.

The brewers respect this policy, abide by and agree with it. The beer at the end of the day is one we almost always have together. Sometimes one of our own sometimes not. We enjoy our jobs and part of that enjoyment is the end of the day beer and enjoying the fruits of our labor. Let's not forget that we're still brewers.

chaser
12-11-2011, 03:46 PM
I used to have a beer at lunch. Did not take long to realize that was a bad idea. Not immediately after, but once I got to brewhouse CIP, man was I ready to go home.

So, I instated a policy for myself and everyone that works for me that once the beer is in the fermenter, the glycol temps are set, the CIPs are over...Your putting away clamps, gaskets and hoses and a squeegy is in your hands, then you can have a beer.

Brewers are allowed 2x 5 gallon kegs/month to take home with them. They, along with ALL of my staff, are allowed no more than 2 beers/day at our bar or at ANY other local brewery or affiliated establishment. We are professionals and I expect my staff to behave as such.

The brewers respect this policy, abide by and agree with it. The beer at the end of the day is one we almost always have together. Sometimes one of our own sometimes not. We enjoy our jobs and part of that enjoyment is the end of the day beer and enjoying the fruits of our labor. Let's not forget that we're still brewers.

Imposing regulations on drinking outside of your own establishment seems a bit draconian don't you think....

barleywhiner
01-04-2012, 12:47 PM
Imposing regulations on drinking outside of your own establishment seems a bit draconian don't you think....


Ours is a very public position and one that garners respect and adoration. I don't want to find out that a brewer or any employee went over to another brewery and poorly represented themselves and my brewery.

This is not the industry for drunks/problem alcoholics. I won't have them working for me and representing my business.

Besides, breweries all across the country have rules around drug use. I'm not saying they can't drink. I'm saying if their doing it at one of our accounts, or another brewery, that they conduct themselves with professionalism. If they want to get drunk, do it at home, and don't show up hungover.

Believe it or not, this has yet to be a problem.

vincent
02-26-2012, 07:30 AM
As a rule of thumb, our bodies can process roughly a beer an hour...if a brewer is drinking more than a beer an hour he/she will be over the limit for my brewery. I dont discourage drinking, this is what i say, drink as much as you feel but if you get drunk, while working, you are fired....a beer with lunch is fine...if a brewer is drinking before 2 pm then there might be issues...filtering can be an issue with drinking, one must show constraint when filtering...but generally i screen candidates and treat them as adults, if a brewer gets drunk while working then they have to deal with consequences

Lex
02-26-2012, 10:42 AM
http://bloodalcoholcalculator.org/

Hire fat brewers

Thirsty_Monk
02-26-2012, 06:05 PM
http://bloodalcoholcalculator.org/

Hire fat brewers
I thought nobody trusted skiny brewers anyway :)

LuskusDelph
02-27-2012, 10:38 AM
http://bloodalcoholcalculator.org/

Hire fat brewers

LOL. maybe that's one answer..but whatever the case may be, having drunk brewers on board (even mildly "buzzed") is certainly not a good idea for all the sensible reasons already covered.

Quite frankly, hiring anyone who can't not drink during the course of the day (despite the fact that they are surrounded by beer) would be asking for trouble. I think the limits mentioned by others in the thread regarding on-the-job tippling and end-of-shift limits before leaving the workplace are sound and sensible...especially in the litigious society we live in.

As far as tasting for QC purposes as mentioned further up this thread, yes...that's vital. Save it for the very end of the day. If that's not practical for some reason, QC tasting/evaluation can certainly be done without having to down a whole pint of the stuff. If a brewer can't evaluate a beer based on a couple of ounces, then perhaps they should brush up on on their sensory skills.:D

BigChoice
02-27-2012, 04:32 PM
I thought nobody trusted skiny brewers anyway :)
At least that's what I tell my wife when she goes to the gym and asks me if I want to come...:rolleyes:

kai
02-28-2012, 03:27 AM
As far as tasting for QC purposes as mentioned further up this thread, yes...that's vital. Save it for the very end of the day. If that's not practical for some reason, QC tasting/evaluation can certainly be done without having to down a whole pint of the stuff.

Yes, it sure can. But your palate is much sharper at the start of the day, so in my opinion it's much better to do tasting sessions in the morning.

Just save it till the toothpaste taste is out of your mouth.

kai
02-28-2012, 03:28 AM
http://bloodalcoholcalculator.org/

Hire fat brewers

Fat doesn't help with blood alcohol content, so hire brawny brewers.

This still excludes me, unfortunately :(

callmetim
02-28-2012, 08:08 AM
if the fattest brewers wins then I get first prize. In my real job we had to fill out a health questionnaire thing which I didn't want to do but whatever. anyways the results came back that based on cholesterol, triglycerides, BP, height and weight that by and large I am healthy but too short for my weight.:p

GoldenArm
05-08-2012, 02:46 PM
Does anyone here who has a drinking policy allowing necessary sampling for QC/QA provide a specific definition of "necessary sampling"?
Or do you just use that language and trust your employees' discretion?

JDrum
10-10-2012, 06:07 PM
I learned early on as a helper (unpaid at the time) in a brewpub that any beer at all during the day was not going to work at all for me. Not only the confusion while trying to learn, but the fatigue that can accompany alcohol consumption was what made that perfectly clear!

A very famous man in the brewing field by the name of Lewis (some of you may know him) once told me (paraphrased):

"As a professional brewer, you have committed to a life of relative sobriety... there is nothing more detrimental and harmful to the art of brewing than the drunken brewer. I know it may not be what you want to hear, but it's the truth. It's true."

(He wasn't reprimanding me for anything specific at the time... LOL)

Aside from the obvious safety issues while working, we as professionals have an obligation to act in such a way that preserves respect for what we do.

I, like most, would never want to give up enjoying the fruits of my (and others) labor; great beer is one of the best things in life IMO.

But, I think it is important to remember that if one allows it to turn into a drinking job, nothing good can come of it.

DBrewer
10-14-2012, 08:47 PM
Does anyone here who has a drinking policy allowing necessary sampling for QC/QA provide a specific definition of "necessary sampling"?
Or do you just use that language and trust your employees' discretion?

It is understood at our brewery that drinking in excess is not acceptable. We do a taste panel for QA/QC 5 days a week with 4-6 beers (3 oz each). generally these samples are not completely finished...

Before any beer goes to packaging we pull QA taste samples to sign off as it is actually REQUIRED. Generally this happens towards the end of a shift so there is no issues however sometimes it does fall in the middle. There is no written policy, moreso trust as you said with employee discretion. Tasting is necessary and can't be avoided. All our employees have the ability to pull samples directly from process as well to check status of bright tanks, filter, centrifuge and fermenters at any time for any reason....We do this to help maintain our quality standards and it works very well...

That is a great quote from Lewis as well....It is very true.

kai
10-15-2012, 06:02 AM
It is understood at our brewery that drinking in excess is not acceptable. We do a taste panel for QA/QC 5 days a week with 4-6 beers (3 oz each). generally these samples are not completely finished...

Before any beer goes to packaging we pull QA taste samples to sign off as it is actually REQUIRED. Generally this happens towards the end of a shift so there is no issues however sometimes it does fall in the middle. There is no written policy, moreso trust as you said with employee discretion..

A serious question, if you don't mind me inadvertently prying into your brewery's procedures:

the first part, do you have standards for what constitutes a 'pass' or a 'fail' for the QA taste sample before release to packaging?

and secondly, what happens if a batch 'fails' the QA sensory check?

LuskusDelph
10-15-2012, 04:50 PM
Yes, it sure can. But your palate is much sharper at the start of the day, so in my opinion it's much better to do tasting sessions in the morning.

Just save it till the toothpaste taste is out of your mouth.


On one level, I understand that since it's very true that the tastebuds are sharper in the morning.

On the other hand though, morning isn't really the time that most people drink beer. So it seems to me that a tasting session later in the day would give a clearer indication what customers will actually be tasting in the afternoon/evening, the more typical consumption scenario.

Depends on how you look at it, I suppose...

vejadude
01-26-2013, 09:23 AM
I do electrical control work for a manfacturer and came to the biz from construction and industrial electric work and even though I'm around amazing beer and great folks I always have to remind folks that the workplace we make this amazing beer in is rife with opportunities to hurt or kill when not acting carefully. I never drink on task until I have stopped work for the day. I am not as concerned with harming myself(which I am pretty concerned about) as much as I am concerned for others who could be affected by an accident due to my negligence. Any person who has a concience would rue the day they caused somebody harm due to being buzzed and inattentive
Tasting aint drinking and work safety MUST come first
Besides , I want to be able to relax when I drink

kererubrewing
02-11-2013, 02:48 AM
Is QC sampling the same as drinking? I'm quite happy to evaluate my beers and generally only ever pour 2 ounces (50ml) to get a good sensory perception of what's going on. Using decent tasting glasses that trap aroma also help.

BrewerRev
03-13-2013, 10:59 AM
What happened at Harpoon?

AnthonyB
03-13-2013, 11:22 AM
A plastic keg was mixed into their returns and the keg failed when subjected to their cleaning regimen which included a high pressure purge. It killed the cleaning operator in the process. The operator wasn't inebriated but their cleaning program had several missing safe guards and they were fined by OSHA as a result.

Bainbridge
03-13-2013, 12:19 PM
That wasn't Harpoon, that was Redhook's Portsmouth plant. And no drinking was involved; their keg washer was using air pressures that were fine for steel (engineered to hold 10 times its max working capacity, 60 psi, so about 600psi as I remember) but not fine for plastic PKA kegs (which are rated for 60 working, but pop at 90, or so I heard).

That said, yep. No drinking while dealing with dangerous anything.

a10t2
03-13-2013, 01:01 PM
their keg washer was using air pressures that were fine for steel (engineered to hold 10 times its max working capacity, 60 psi, so about 600psi as I remember)

I think the problem was that they had no pressure regulation on the air compressor, and that the keg's pressure relief also failed. I've had a PKA keg fail at the center seam under normal working pressure (10-12 psi), but my hypothesis is that it had been weakened by multiple freeze-thaw cycles after a bar left it outside.

http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20121021/GJNEWS_01/121029899
http://www.saferproducts.gov/ViewIncident/1266302

ChesterBrew
02-28-2016, 08:44 AM
I'm reviving this thread to chime in on the subject... I recently had an incident where an employee became very intoxicated while filling kegs and then attempted to act as though they were not impaired even though I could tell that they were within 30 seconds of our conversation. We're also still learning our system losses, so we're getting less kegs out of our 3bbl system than it can do, so of course I now have in the back of my mind how much of those losses may be due to imbibing.

I had thought it was clear before, but it's crystal clear for me now: beer consumption is limited to QA work while you're on the clock. Period.

I really hate playing the heavy, but this is too damn dangerous of an industry to let people drink on the job. I need to be able to trust the people I've hired, and do, but incidents like I just encountered really affect that. Just my two cents.

Hoodbridge Brew
03-29-2016, 03:00 PM
We've experienced a few incidents of folks from other breweries making asses out of themselves after hours. In the first incident, since we're still in the build out phase and were working some potential accounts, we were asking about the things that the restaurant liked and disliked about dealing with the local breweries, trying to improve our customer service. The manager told us he wouldn't be carrying beer from one local brewery because one of the guys from the brewery had come in after work, got shit faced, started spouting all sorts of nonsense, and generally making an ass out of himself, while still in his work clothes and representing himself as an employee. Second incident, this young guy who is an assistant brewer at a different local place shows up to the anniversary party for another brewery, and does essentially the same thing, only this time at me. I wasn't sober, but I wasn't being a dick. Not that I ratted the kid out, but he's definitely not super welcome at my place. The head brewer we have hired and the other owner and I have agreed that drinking at another brewery or at a customer's place is just like drinking at our brewery. We're not anti-fun by any stretch, but one incident like the above, and you're done.

As for working hours, no drinking except for required QA/QC until everything scheduled that day is done. If I came to the brewery and found staff having beers while there was still work in the brewery not done, I would likely loose my cool. It's a brewery, but it's still a job, with lots of hazards and all it takes is one incident where someone gets hurt, even if the drinking wasn't the cause. It's just not worth it. I have lots of other ways to be a cool boss, like our pimp employee lounge and keezer with R&D batches that they can take all they want of, with the above rules always being in play. Our motto is, "Work Hard. Have fun. Don't be an asshole."

jgladfel
08-14-2017, 10:47 PM
Hey all,

We are having a dialogue on this topic during GABF week in Denver as part of our Great American Brewers Dialogue series.
Basically, the set up is this:
Brewery respresentatives (brewers, staff, owners) will gather at Bierstadt Lagerhaus.
They will be willing to discuss this subject with each other.
We will provide facilitators to keep things on topic, engaging and respectful.
We want ideas to be shared, concerns addressed and the subject analyzed.
We are working on recruiting some speakers from other industries associated with brewing (e.g. workplace insurance)
This is a FREE event.
Oct. 5th 1-3pm

Please contact me for more info, or if you're interested.

www.ovaloptions.com/GABD

beerlawcenter
08-21-2017, 08:03 AM
Jason -

Sorry I'm gonna miss this, sounds like a great topic. One little thing that i hope someone mentions or talks about... at least while on shift, many state's ABCs specifically define who can have what and how much during their work shift.

For example, NC limits the amount that a person can "taste" on shift to no more than 2oz samples totally only 8oz in any one shift AND that's only if your job includes quality control or the purchasing of beer for the business. AND (this is where NC gets weird too), if you want to drink *after* your shift, you have to "de-brand" (i.e. remove your work uniform or t-shirt advertising the brewery/business you work at). So, "shift beers" are a bit more of a regulatory "gotcha" if you're not careful.

Anyway, just wanted to bring up that you may have state laws that specifically define the limits or ability of employee drinking.

Cheers!
John

Todd Hicks
08-21-2017, 08:50 AM
Here is my recent revision of "Rules".

+++

Brew Crew Guidelines and Etiquette

The privilege of being a brewer comes with the obligation to behave in a professional manner at all times that you are on site at the brewery, or are serving in any field representation for the brewery. Brewers work in a highly visible position since our customers can watch us many of the times we are working. For this reason, whether on or off the clock, you will still be recognized as a brewer, and therefore, a representative of the Company. That being said, the benefits are also numerous and require a strong level of personal restraint, and adhesion to a few very simple and reasonable guidelines. The foundation of these rules is to remain innocuous, clean, safe, and a true model of efficiency and professional work habits. In other words, the brewery must look perfect in every respect and not cause problems for anyone. This means, to a certain extent, taking care of yourself; eat healthy, get adequate sleep, and try not to drink too much beer or partake excessively in other vices as to routinely affect your work and safety. When this is understood and you have accomplished this basic tenant of responsibility, the rest is easy. The guidelines of etiquette and benefits of working in the brewery are detailed together and listed below because the rules and benefits are basically two sides of the same coin when it comes to the honorable tradition of Sternewirth Privilege.

I. THE BREW CREW MUST MAKE EVERY EFFORT TO ACCOMMODATE THE NEEDS AND OPERATIONS OF THE PUB. The fact rests that the brewery operations function separately from the hospitality venue of the pub and grounds. Every once in a while, operations and schedules will clash and a mild conflict of interest will develop. Be courteous to pub employees, management, customers, and official regulators so that a friendly and proper solution will resolve any operational issue.

II. ONLY BARTENDERS AND MANAGERS MAY DRAW BEER FOR YOUR CONSUMPTION FROM THE PUB TAPS. This is self-explanatory, but is important for the following reasons:

The Bartenders or Managers are ultimately responsible for beer served in the Pub.
All beer dispensed from the Pub must be accounted for.
Bartenders have the sole Right to Refuse Service To Anyone, including Customers, Employees, Brewers, Managers, and Partners.
Enjoying beer that you made is a Privilege, NOT a Right.

Brewers may draw beer from the following sources during the course of normal work duties for Tasting, Quality Evaluation, Measurements, Volume Readings, and Analytical Sampling:

From a Fermenter, Bright Beer, or Serving Tank using proper sanitary procedures.
From a Filter in the course of filtration.
During the course of kegging, racking, or transferring beer.
In the processes of packaging beer into bottles and cans.
While cleaning draft beer lines in the pub.
While setting up a remote draft beer system or jockey box for events.
When putting a new keg of beer of draft or while troubleshooting draft beer issues.
Or, as approved by a manager to accommodate the needs and operations of the Pub.

III. BREWERS ARE ENTITLED TO SHIFT BEERS AT THE END OF THEIR SHIFT AT THE SOLE DISCRETION OF MANAGEMENT. These must be poured by a Bartender or by Management and properly accounted for. Brewers must know their limitations and self-regulate their consumption. Excessive intoxication or unruliness will not be tolerated and may result in restriction of Sternewirth Privilege, Punitive Action, or Termination.


IV. POLICY FOR BREWERS WHEN OFF SHIFT.
Brewers that are off shift must stay out of and away from production areas when not working unless authorized by a Head Brewer or Management.
Brewers must NEVER remain on the premises when excessively intoxicated. Excessive intoxication or unruliness will not be tolerated and may result in restriction of Sternewirth Privilege, Punitive Action, or Termination.
Brewers may enjoy their shift beer at the bar or in the Pub provided they wear clean, dry clothing. A change of clothing is always recommended.
Brewers that wish to patronize the Pub as a customer must act appropriately as a customer and as a representative of the Company following good etiquette and self-moderation. Brewers are entitled to any employee discounts as appropriate. Bartenders have the sole Right to Refuse Service To Anyone, including Customers, Employees, Brewers, Managers, and Partners.
At all costs, avoid getting excessively intoxicated or unruly in any off shift function where you may be perceived as a representative of the Company.
Avoid visiting the Pub or interfere with brewery operations if you are intoxicated.
It is expected that brewers are happy to make room for customers when the Pub is busy in order to accommodate the needs and operations of the Pub.

V. BREWERS ARE ENTITLED TO EMPLOYEE BREAKS AS REQUIRED BY LAW. BREWERS ARE ENTITLED TO A MEAL BREAK DURING EVERY SHIFT. Taking a meal break off premises must be approved by a Head Brewer or Manager and you must clock out. If a brewer is closely monitoring a process, clocking out for a quick meal break is not necessary at the Head Brewer’s discretion, otherwise you must clock out for your meal break and resume work afterwords. Eating is not allowed in production areas. Smoking is not allowed in any production areas, in the Pub, or anywhere indoors.

VI. IF YOU WANT TO DRINK EXCESSIVELY, THE BEST POLICY IS TO GO SOMEWHERE ELSE! BEHAVE, DO NOT DRIVE WHILE INTOXICATED, AND DO NOT INTENTIONALLY OR UNINTENTIONALLY MAKE THE BREWERY LOOK BAD BY NOT FOLLOWING THE PROPER ETIQUETTE AND DECORUM THAT IS EXPECTED OF A PROFESSIONAL BREWER. BE SAFE AND RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR ACTIONS.

jgladfel
08-30-2017, 02:49 PM
Thanks, John, for the insight. I have spoken with a few people in "associated" industries and they have relayed something similar.
Will you be in Denver that week?


Jason -

Sorry I'm gonna miss this, sounds like a great topic. One little thing that i hope someone mentions or talks about... at least while on shift, many state's ABCs specifically define who can have what and how much during their work shift.

For example, NC limits the amount that a person can "taste" on shift to no more than 2oz samples totally only 8oz in any one shift AND that's only if your job includes quality control or the purchasing of beer for the business. AND (this is where NC gets weird too), if you want to drink *after* your shift, you have to "de-brand" (i.e. remove your work uniform or t-shirt advertising the brewery/business you work at). So, "shift beers" are a bit more of a regulatory "gotcha" if you're not careful.

Anyway, just wanted to bring up that you may have state laws that specifically define the limits or ability of employee drinking.

Cheers!
John

jgladfel
09-07-2017, 12:46 PM
Just a note: we have added three presenters to the Dialogue:

Morgan Mahoney from CCIG Insurance and Benefits.
Joel Peach from Geeks Who Drink
Jay Stolkin from Dinsmore & Shohl (attorney)

UPDATE: Allison Goico will also present. She is also with Dinsmore & Shohl, focusing on employment and labor law.

jgladfel
09-29-2017, 09:21 AM
For the Dialogue during GABF Week, we've added another speaker/presenter:
Linda Rae Holcomb from Gluek Beer out of Minneapolis is scheduled to join! She is an internationally touring Certified Yoga & Nutrition teacher, teaching and lecturing at festivals and conferences all over the world.

More info: www.ovaloptions.com/gabd

jgladfel
10-18-2017, 04:32 PM
Hey all,

Our Great American Brewers Dialogue went very well and I have completed a summary of our notes. It's available to anyone who wants it.
To be sure, it's a summary of notes and not a set of guidelines or academic term paper. But it does contain some good information and tips.

Please let me know if you would like a free copy.

Cheers and Beers!

Jason

STBC!
10-18-2017, 06:02 PM
Hey all,

Our Great American Brewers Dialogue went very well and I have completed a summary of our notes. It's available to anyone who wants it.
To be sure, it's a summary of notes and not a set of guidelines or academic term paper. But it does contain some good information and tips.

Please let me know if you would like a free copy.

Cheers and Beers!

Jason

I would like one! dcallender89@gmail.com Thanks!

Todd Hicks
10-19-2017, 06:12 AM
Add Todd@serdabrewing.com to the request list.

Maybe just post an attachment or link.

Patrickbhavana
10-23-2017, 04:07 PM
Hey all,

Our Great American Brewers Dialogue went very well and I have completed a summary of our notes. It's available to anyone who wants it.
To be sure, it's a summary of notes and not a set of guidelines or academic term paper. But it does contain some good information and tips.

Please let me know if you would like a free copy.

Cheers and Beers!

Jason

I'd love the notes as well!

patrick@brewerybhavana.com

jgladfel
10-24-2017, 10:17 AM
Add Todd@serdabrewing.com to the request list.

Maybe just post an attachment or link.

I'm not sure if I'm allowed to post a link to my own website :eek:
But I sent you one just as well.

Cheers!