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admin
07-27-2009, 03:44 PM
Help us expand this great resource Jamie Martin helped us create for the brewing community. There are no Stupid Questions, and though your tip might seem like common Brewer's sense to you, it could be someone elses epiphany. :D
http://www.probrewer.com/resources/stupidstuff

MikeRoy
07-27-2009, 11:18 PM
From my experiences and my peers (who shall remain nameless)

Personal

* Never dump a bag of rice hulls into an auger
* Always remember to turn your kettle on BEFORE you reach targeted kettle volume
* Never stick your head into a manway of a tank that has recently been purged with CO2
* Always remember to turn off the water inlet valve of a kettle when you walk away from the brewhouse(especially when there is already preheated hot water in it....especially if the brewhouse exhaust fan isn't on... especially if the brewhouse door is wide open...especially if the fire department has installed detectors that light up quick when steam hits them!

Peers

*Always make sure you've turned your heat exchanger on before knock out.....especially if you don't realize that your wort temp in your fermenter is 200 F....and especially if you've already pitched your yeast! (times 4!)
* If you are priming your cask beer with sugar, make sure to add it into the cask before you've hammered the bung in...especially if you've already filled it with beer
*When purging wort through a hose on brewday from your heat exchanger to the fermenter, make sure the wort that is being purged isn't from yesterday's brew

JMBrewer
07-28-2009, 06:17 AM
Mike, those are some awesome tips and it is pretty funny knowing the background stories. One tip you may have forgotten to mention was not to sparge with wort.

Graydon
07-28-2009, 10:20 AM
We should take a tip from the boiler manufactures and put a stipe of paint or tape down the back side of our sight glass to make it easier to read the level in the tank.
Graydon

wildcrafter
07-29-2009, 02:46 PM
How many scale issues are there? A bunch I bet!

A thought- Small scale brewers may have more interest in higher quality ingredients than large scale producers,,,,and they should.:D

Unique ingredients may not always be available in scale to large brewers.

Small can be tasty!:cool:

Small scale folks can corner small markets?;)

Why don't large scale brewers invest more in unique opportunities like small scale brewers?? Are they just comfortable in their success? Change is no longer needed? Really?:confused:

matthendry
07-31-2009, 08:23 AM
Remember to turn the Water tap off at the faucet and dont just leave the water hose nozzle closed before you leave work :o

And make sure you put the labels the right way up in the labeler and keep the crown hopper on the filler toped up at all times .

GlacierBrewing
07-31-2009, 12:22 PM
Never have your CIP pump switch "ON" while you are plugging it in (arc action!).
Never stand in front of a pump "output" while you turn it on.
Slow down and check you malt bill twice, hop bill twice, FINAL GRAVITY three times, and deliberately note the state of your valves BEFORE you turn on the pump.
Learn (teach yourself, get a book, bug a pro) how to fix EVERYTHING in the brewery but know when to call a professional. For me, it's usually electrical and refrigeration.
Learn how to do everything in the brewery. EVERYTHING. From washing kegs to brewing to running the packaging line to running the tasting room to working the books. This takes a lot of time, but it is so worth it.
Don't let a job title go to your head.
Realize it's okay to say to someone (your boss, customer, vendor, employee) "I don't know. But I'll find out for you."
Just because the sight glass says you have one barrel of beer left, don't always believe it. Drain it and refill to be certain.
Keep current on maintenance.
Go around the brewhouse and cellar and retighten all the triclamps. They loosen over time.
Keep great inventory records. Whoever has the most paperwork, wins!
Mop the floor once in awhile. It keeps you humble.

Prost!
dave

Jephro
07-31-2009, 07:35 PM
- I previously worked for a brewer who was a Pharmacist before he started brewing. As a Pharmacist he was trained to triple check everything he did before he did it. I use this in the brewery everyday before I start processes, remove clamps, or open valves, and it has saved me much grief and Iím sure a significant amount of pain.

Some of these are from my own personal experience; others were at my peerís expense:
ē Always make sure the Hot Liquor Tank is NOT open before you start your whirlpool
ē Always ensure that the sample port and racking arm valves are CLOSED, and that the CIP valve is OPEN before you start to knock out
ē If you have a pre-chiller on your heat exchanger donít turn it on too soon before knock out, the sani in your HX will freeze
ē Donít lean over the kettle with stuff in your shirt pocket (has anyone seen my phone?)
ē Beer Stone Sucks!!! Acid is your friend, run regular acid/passivation cycles. If you stay on top of it you will save yourself a lot of grief, time, and expense.
ē Bleach + Stainless = Pitted Stainless - Leave the bleach in the janitors closet where it belongs
ē Stay sober in the brewery!! There are too many ways to hurt yourself. People already think all we do is stand around and drink beer all day, donít fuel the myth.
ē Donít tuck your pants into your boots (or your coat into your waders)
ē Always know where the nearest sample valve is in reference to your head, the scars on my head will prove why.
ē When carbonating beer, tie a string around your finger, set a timer, put a note at the bottom of your pint Ė Just donít forget, I have seen foam 6Ē deep in a cooler from trying to degas a over-carbed beer

-Jeff

mr.jay
07-31-2009, 09:33 PM
Don't vent tank X, then accidentally open the manway of pressurized tank Y.

When you are ready to CIP a fermenter, don't dump your trub only to realize moments later (because you were dumb enough to walk away to the storage closet to get something) you had 10 Bbls of fermenting wort in there.

Don't accidentally pump caustic into your HLT because you didn't close a valve before cleaning.

Don't "work" at the Spring Brewer's Fest on a completely empty stomach, on the hottest day of the year.:o

Herbstoffe
08-01-2009, 09:50 PM
Brewing:

ē Donít transfer 3 ton of a 20 ton ale malt deliverer, then realize you are actually putting it into a pilsner malt silo, even if it is 5am, you are going to look pretty stupid.

ē Donít try to CIP a tank with 200hl of pilsner in it; itís very hard to get a 3 inch tri clover blank and seal back onto a tank full of very, very cold beer.

ē Donít leave the kettle drain valve open, and then transfer in 50hl of wort from the wort holding vessel, its not so cool when you realize that all the foam in the brewery drains, is the wort that is meant to be in the kettle.

ē Donít yeast off a tank and walk away, its very hard to then filter that beer if the cellar hand has dumped 50hl of a 50hl batch down the drain.

ē Donít forget to set the cooling to the right temp after you have finished your brew day, just turning the cooler back on and not checking is asking for trouble, i.e. the next morning the 200hl of wort is at 0 degrees C, or it over the next to days hits 30 degrees C.

ē Do buy a cheapish digital watch with a 20 min count down timer function, its great, you just set it going and because 20 minutes have pasted and have been distracted by 20 other jobs you remember what you where doing 20 minutes ago, saved my bacon a lot of times that $100 watch.




Packaging:

ē Donít put the wrong labels on a bottle, sound pretty obvious, but when you have body, neck and back labels, it can happen, so check them at regular intervals, because itís not much fun putting a few thousand bottle in water to float of the labels, then relabel them.

ē Donít run hot liquor through any lab or portable brewery equipment like a CO2 gehalt meter.



Cheers and Beers

Brett

kai
08-02-2009, 08:05 PM
All very good tips, brettles.

I'll add one to it... if the bottom of a tank is stuck with yeast or trub, be very careful how you unblock it. There's nothing quite like leaving a person-shaped yeast silhouette on the wall behind you.

wildcrafter
08-03-2009, 09:21 AM
Great tip for brewers?

Hop harvest time is right around the corner.

Are you planning to make a Fresh Hop Ale? Better order your hops now! Take your staff to the fields and have an educational day picking hops! Take the time now to learn more about hops!

Get yer hops!!
Get yer hops!!

'Tis the season!!:cool:

lhall
08-03-2009, 03:05 PM
1. Always ask if they will work for beer. You'd never believe how many tradesmen will help you out for just material cost if you run them a bar tab for their labor.
2. Check your yeast viability BEFORE you start the brew.
3. You will need four times as many taphandles as you think you should. When taphandles get to a distributor, every salesperson will grab one just to stash in their car for when they might need one.
4. You can freeze the water in the lines of a jockey box if the ice you used came out of a deep freeze. And it's no fun trying to thaw the lines out when you have a line of people waiting on beer. Run beer through the lines first before putting the ice in.
5. Make sure your glycol percentage is right in your chillers. It needs to be right for the suction temperature of the REFRIGERANT not the temperature you expect to hold the glycol/ water mixture at. If not, you will have ice building up on your heat transfer coils, lowering the cooling capacity of the chiller. Took me three years to realize that.

wildcrafter
08-03-2009, 04:13 PM
Ok, let's try sharing this info here!

You want dry hop magic at the pub?,,listen up! :cool:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cheat it all.

Option 1- 2 large water filters in line to the tap with one packed with whole leaf KILLER FLAVOR hops,,and the second to catch particles. 1/4 # per 5 gallon dispense. Use really good hops! Advertise the special option.


Option cheat big-
You may not like this answer and you can doctor it to perfection.
You can brew your own brews or even dispense even Natural light to win this one.

Here's the big ez magic,,,yet seasonal? (Fresh is the game,,,but dried works ok,,,it's just got flakes and chunks in the glass and a different flavor.)

One fresh cone of really good hops in even 12 oz of Natural light is a whole new animal,,sometimes over the top in hop flavor. Use super good fresh hops,,,maybe from the freezer or fridge or field.

Imagine a fresh hop cone floating uncrushed in your pint of brew at you own pub with your beer as the base.

Do you think folks that like fruit chunks in their fruity bev might want to try a beer with a fresh hop cone in it? I know they do!!!!!!!!!! Want another market share?

Hello out there!

'Tis the season!!

Get yer hops on!!!!

csquared
08-03-2009, 06:20 PM
Dry hopping in a fermenter that was closed off.

Pellets up the nose while you try to reattach a PRV 15 feet above ground always ends up with stitches and ruined clothes.

Oh, if you happen to have a toilet that was piped into the brewery drains, just smash the thing before it becomes a kitchen folks have to number 2 without holding up the restaurant bathrooms. Never had more fun with a sledgehammer.:D

gabewilson50
08-04-2009, 06:45 AM
A couple more off the top of my head.

Dry hopping:
Make sure the beer is done or almost done fermenting, or you can end up with not just pellets up your nose, but a face full of trub.

CIP:
Don't forget to close the CO2 valve on the CIP arm. Nothing's more fun than shooting hot caustic across the brewery when you turn on the pump, especially if you're in the line of fire (did this yesterday, actually).

--Gabe

doverbrewer
08-04-2009, 03:30 PM
Marry a woman who makes Good money. Odds are, you won't!

Element Brewing
08-04-2009, 10:06 PM
CIP:
Don't forget to close the CO2 valve on the CIP arm. Nothing's more fun than shooting hot caustic across the brewery when you turn on the pump, especially if you're in the line of fire (did this yesterday, actually).

Turn on the CIP pump before you add caustic to ensure you have not made any mistakes in your cleaning set-up. Better to be hit with hot water than hot caustic!

Moonlight
08-05-2009, 04:36 AM
I've done far too many dumb things to list them all here. My tip instead would instead be:

Never settle for making pretty good beer.
Strive to make the most delicious beer possible.
Never stop trying to make better beer.
The results of your efforts will become your reputation, and follow you if you ever want to get a more satisfying position, or even just make enough money for a bank loan someday.

Or, instead, if you at least make pretty good beer, you could always find a pretty good job in some beer production facility.
It is your call.
It's not for me to judge.

That and...
Only use NSF buckets in the brewery, because they make clean up so much easier.

Rosie
08-06-2009, 02:17 AM
doverbrewer, you hit the head on the nail (as my wife would say it!)

A tip someone gave me before I made the jump:

Brewing beer is easy, selling it is a bastard. :o

And of course:

Don't stick your head in the fermenter! :eek:

Brew on brothers...

Sulfur
08-06-2009, 05:57 AM
-get a pH meter
-develop good relationships with your suppliers
-develop good relationships with your spent grain guy/gal/group
-always keep plan B in mind
-Use your ears. First thing in the morning, how does the brewery sound? All pumps sound ok, no unusual noises or vibrations? Is there an unexplained hissing sound etc.
-Have backups of critical parts - gaskets, fittings, tubing, valves, etc. A spare pump would be nice....
-There is always something to do...but don't stay at the brewery 24/7
-Instead of dumping your acid/sanitizing cycle immediately down the drain, let it out over the floor (assuming it can take it). Good way to get an extra cleaning done.
-Clean your draught lines (long-draw) every 2 weeks.
-CYA (Cover Your ---)

Jeff Lockhart
08-11-2009, 03:47 PM
Remove the hose from the valve...NOT the valve from the tank/kettle. Good way to get burned or frozen in the cold room.

gabewilson50
08-12-2009, 09:00 AM
Remove the hose from the valve...NOT the valve from the tank/kettle. Good way to get burned or frozen in the cold room.

If you do make this mistake (I've done it once or twice) OPEN THE VALVE before attempting to replace it. You'll think you're just dumping more liquid, but you'll be able to quickly replace the valve and close it.

kai
08-12-2009, 09:20 AM
Or make sure from the start that it's a lot harder to disconnect from the wrong side of the valve. It's always best to assume that everyone is an idiot, including yourself. Nobody's smart at 5 AM or 11 PM or any time when you have seven other things to tend to.

Ted Briggs
08-13-2009, 08:01 AM
Dont Drink 5 pints of IPA and expect to get up early the next morning to brew. :eek: Do say to yourself when the alarm goes off "time to make the donuts!" And then laugh a little bit. Go into work and brew anyway, and get a cheesesteak for lunch.
Buy yourself some good gel inserts for your boots- your feet will thank you.
Polish the tanks and wash the windows. Its PITA, but it makes YOU look good too.
Make sure you have insurance including disability, stuff happens.
Ignore what others say about your beer, good or bad. Be your own critic.
Ill second on marrying a woman who makes good $$. Know where I can find a NEW one??:rolleyes:

CbP Brewing
08-16-2009, 11:12 AM
If you fill kegs with boiling hot wort for priming and propagation later, leave some head space and charge it with 15psi CO2. If you fill it all the way, when the wort cools (and thus contracts in volume), it creates an absolute vacuum, which will suck in dust and everything that is riding on it.

mariposabrewing
09-04-2009, 06:08 PM
Is there some where in the forums where a nube can find out what the abreviations mean?

"I opened the PRV attached to the CRV and burned my ASS"

thanks all keep up the good work

BeerAdmiral
09-14-2009, 02:02 PM
Always double check that you have an available fermenter BEFORE you mash in!

Gregg
09-14-2009, 04:55 PM
"I opened the PRV attached to the CRV and burned my ASS"

PRV = Pressure Relief Valve
CRV = Crew Recovery Vehicle
ASS = Asymptotic Stench Source

Hope this helps.

Geoff Logan
09-24-2009, 12:44 PM
1.) If you use mostly American 2-Row base malt, make sure to adjust your mill gap before using Maris Otter as a base malt to avoid turning it to cement in the Mash Tun. (Damn it! Dealing with this little treasure right now).

2.) Buy a cot. Bad brew days and shitty filter runs do happen.

3.) Set mouse traps (If needed). I just had two baby mice fall from the ceiling! Oops.

4.) Buy Insurance.

5.) Got to pile on the "Marry a money making woman (or man)" thing. How many rich brewers do you know?

Geoff

stfrancois
09-30-2009, 09:02 PM
I got one..make sure you bottle the right beer! Nothing like realizing you bottled beer that isn't carbonated when it is to late.if you do don't try to dump it back in and recarb. Even with co2 in the tank it doesn't end well

DavidS
02-23-2010, 05:41 PM
=Note to self=

Just because the valve fits 1 1/2" pipe, doesnt always mean that the valve opening is 1 1/2".

This can REAALLY slow down your fluid transfer rate

(Said 1" valve is now hidden)

Sulfur
02-24-2010, 07:04 AM
From this very morning. My assistant laid out the day's malt to be mashed in (manual mashing in.) I counted the sacks and discovered one short. A similar thing happened to me a few years ago when I was doing a joint brew. I thought the other guy verified the number, and he thought I did, and walla - we ended up forgetting one sack. Made for a long boil and day. Anyway, the moral is, always verify your malt bill before mashing in!

Rosie
02-24-2010, 07:40 AM
I find that the number of cockups is proportional to the number of people in the brewhouse.

Was doing a training brew a couple months back and half way through the sparge, holy shit we completely forgot the speciality malt. In the end good training in how to think on our feet. Only other major cock up of the previous year was when I was showing someone else around.

beerking1
02-24-2010, 12:19 PM
From this very morning. My assistant laid out the day's malt to be mashed in (manual mashing in.) I counted the sacks and discovered one short. A similar thing happened to me a few years ago when I was doing a joint brew. I thought the other guy verified the number, and he thought I did, and walla - we ended up forgetting one sack. Made for a long boil and day. Anyway, the moral is, always verify your malt bill before mashing in!

I did that homebrewing once. Was brewing a Maibock. My mill (a Valleymill) holds ~5# in the hopper, so I usually add the base malt in 5# batches. Left one out, and brewed the best Vienna I have ever made!

Jephro
02-26-2010, 05:41 PM
I find that the number of cockups is proportional to the number of people in the brewhouse.

Was doing a training brew a couple months back and half way through the sparge, holy shit we completely forgot the speciality malt. In the end good training in how to think on our feet. Only other major cock up of the previous year was when I was showing someone else around.

Funny, i find that to be true as well. I normally work alone in this cramped 7bbl brewery, seems every time i get an assistant in for some cross-training i totally wiff something.

My worst one, left the water on and overfilled my MT with "pre-heat" water for the next days brew and flooded the hopper that i had already milled into. Nothing like starting a brew @ 6PM after already working 10 hours, Loooong day, but i saved the brew!! :D
BTW- have you ever tried to send wet milled grain through an auger designed for dry malt, not fun.

KevinECB
02-27-2010, 08:37 AM
the first two are mine,

Don't start a brewing story with when i was sixteen (or whatever age it is illegal to brew at in your state/Country), even if it was an innocent and Legal story, you just made yourself look bad.

Donít use a new order of opening and closing valves (that might be potentially faster and more effective) until you have it all down pat in your head, and then rehearsed it six times. *9 out of 10 IS bad, especially if number ten is the drain valve on your whirlpool

Do start running water through your HX before you start your cast out, Donít start running Glycal through several mins before you start to cast out, a frozen HX can make you shift run long

Always check ALL redundant valves leading from the HX to the HLT before casting out, CIPing the HLT in the middle of a 24hr a day brew week is time consuming

David Hicks
02-28-2010, 09:27 PM
Don't start a brewing story with when i was sixteen, even if it was an innocent and Legal story, you just made yourself look bad.


I don't see how having a passion for beer in youth makes you look bad.

Im 19, age is a tender subject...

David Hicks
03-05-2010, 08:08 PM
In SC you cant even be the employee of a brewer until you are 21.

The point is that brewing is a craft, passion for a craft from an early age is a good thing. Our country just has an annoying attitude about alcohol.

Sulfur
03-11-2010, 12:21 PM
Avoid disaster when labeling, make sure your labels are oriented the right way.

bennybrew
03-29-2010, 05:52 AM
Avoid disaster when labeling, make sure your labels are oriented the right way.

make sure you have the right label: ie the 12oz vs 22oz.

turns out people notice this...

BrewerMel
10-29-2010, 07:03 PM
Always remember to replace the plates in the mash tun before putting in 400 pounds of grain. It will save you having to dig out 400 pounds of wet grain, setting the plates and shoveling it all back in.

mmussen
11-01-2010, 02:40 PM
A couple I've done...

When Sparging - make sure to open the valve into the kettle, otherwise the grant overflows very quickly.

Close the valve to drain the sight glass on your SV's when CIPing. Your pumps will thank you.

When dry hopping into a FV I recommend using a cut keg. You add hops to the keg, then let some beer from the FV into the keg - allow the hops to get wet, then shoot the whole mess into the FV using CO2. It works great and you don't have to climb a ladder every time you need to dry hop.

ParishBrewingCo
11-08-2010, 11:24 AM
Wear boots. 210 deg liquid on your toes hurts like hell:eek: . I know they're uncomfortable. Believe me, its worth it.

South County
11-08-2010, 12:49 PM
Wear boots. 210 deg liquid on your toes hurts like hell:eek: . I know they're uncomfortable. Believe me, its worth it.
With the right boots a 14 hr day is nothing w/ a mid-day sock change. Boots are paramount IMO.

Roger Greene
11-08-2010, 03:14 PM
Always close the manifold drain before sparging. Loosing all hot water half-way through is no good.

GlacierBrewing
11-08-2010, 03:28 PM
Always ensure the various plugs are DRY before making the connection!

While brewing, filtering, cleaning, etc. stay at least one or two steps ahead of your process so you don't have to play catch-up.

Don't forget to sing once in awhile as you are scrubbing out the inside of the mash tun. These tanks have GREAT acoustics!:D

Prost!
Dave

kai
11-09-2010, 02:03 AM
Don't forget to sing once in awhile as you are scrubbing out the inside of the mash tun. These tanks have GREAT acoustics!:D

Have to agree with that one, though our spent grain chute points right at the hospitality area and I'm still not entirely sure how much sound carries through it.

chaser
11-09-2010, 01:49 PM
always have your brewery keys on you. nothing like accidentally locking yourself out of the brewery at 5am on a sub-zero temp February morning while the hlt is being topped off.

fa50driver
11-16-2010, 09:43 AM
Do: "Double valve" any hoses that will contain hot liquid that will need to be disconnected such as CIP, HX outlet to HLT, etc. It will save both product and your hands.

Do: Get a gym membership. Starting a brewery will lead to elevated consumption of Beer.

youngbuckbrewer
11-18-2010, 01:46 PM
Make sure you have empty spent grain bins before starting the brew. It is a realy pain in the ass to scramble to empty bins when you are the only one at the brewery so you can refill them. Just happened to me this morning, my farmer neglected to bring me empties.


Michael Uhrich
Carter's Brewing

Eric Brewer
02-05-2011, 11:36 PM
1) A banana a day will keep the cramps at bay.

2) Rubber boots require long socks. Really long. Compression socks are good.

3) Keep a complete change of clothes in a sealed plastic bag at the brewery, along with a new disposable razor, a toothbrush and toothpaste.

4) A sleeping bag and two short stacks of pallets makes decent bedding on hell-nights.

5) When brewing for an audience, don't brew your trickiest 9.2% abv RIS or IIPA. I got reamed on this one today. If I ever do this again, I'm brewing my weizen -- light grain bill, rice hulls, complex enough to make me look like a wizard. (Today -- stuck mash, bad sparge, didn't hit target gravity, had to use a bucket of syrup, and then my heat exchanger clogged solid. Thankfully everyone left before vorlauf.)

6) Doesn't matter how long the day was, get the worst of the mess off the floor and into the drain. Coming back to a sticky mess the morning after a 16-hour day just isn't fun.

7) Gold Bond Medicated Powder.

Jephro
02-15-2011, 11:51 PM
Pretty sure I have already mentioned this, but its worth mentioning again.

Before you open/close valves, discinnect hoses, turn on pumps, stick your bare hands in liquid... etc.

Look at everything and ask yourself 3 times what action you are performing and if everything is, at the present time, the way you think it is and should be.

SAVE: yesterdays brew (post boil-WP) had my hand on the kettle bottom out to the maifold when I stopped, looked and saw 2 valves on the manifold open. One was 8" to my left at eye level.

FAIL: Using brewhouse pump to CIP FV's (CIP pump in shop). Left the kettle CIP valve open after draining manifold and blew caustic into tomorrows brew water... DOH!! .. it was already hot too. Such a waste.

liammckenna
02-16-2011, 12:11 PM
In no particular order:

1/ Spell your name in the snow at least once a year.
2/ Walk in green grass with naked feet. Remember how it feels.
3/ Learn to sing louder than your CIP pump.
4/ Have regular sex with your significant other.
5/ Yeast like music. Give it to them.
6/ Give a brewery tour to children (no samples of course).

Pax.

Liam

Larry Doyle
02-16-2011, 12:51 PM
If, perchance, you CIP a tank with hot liquid, consider leaving the manhole door open. If you don't, you and your tank might collapse.

If you like to live dangerously, try the following: Use your potable water system as a chemical highway where chemicals are mixed in a water stream and then dispensed. And by all means rely on those checkvalves that never work when you need them. For some day when you least expect it you'll find soap and chemicals in all the wrong places.

And don't stop there. Make sure your plumbing systems are very complicated and interconnected. If you try hard enough you can have beer coming out of your drinking fountains and "other venues."

froptus
02-16-2011, 02:23 PM
Heating a cool/cold tank causes pressure. Cooling a warm/hot tank causes a vacuum. Either way leave the manway open or at least a large valve or your tank will explode/collapse. I've never seen an exploded tank but I did see a collapsed, brand new 100 bbl fermentor. What a shame that was and very embarassing for the brewery.

BrewinLou
02-17-2011, 09:05 AM
Keep your fingers away from the bottom manway hinge on the Mash tun when it is first opened. Getting your digit stuck in there while the spent grain is coming out is darn painful and hard to remove.

Pompeiisneaks
02-17-2011, 09:13 AM
Keep your fingers away from the bottom manway hinge on the Mash tun when it is first opened. Getting your digit stuck in there while the spent grain is coming out is darn painful and hard to remove.
The only thing I can say is OW... I cringed at this one.

HinduKush
02-17-2011, 09:55 AM
In no particular order:
5/ Yeast like music. Give it to them.
Pax.

Liam
My yeast is a fan of Primus/anything Claypool, but is doing quite nice with Janis, Zappa, and Jane's Addiction today. Peace.

beejay
02-17-2011, 10:00 AM
In no particular order:

1/ Spell your name in the snow at least once a year.
2/ Walk in green grass with naked feet. Remember how it feels.
3/ Learn to sing louder than your CIP pump.
4/ Have regular sex with your significant other.
5/ Yeast like music. Give it to them.
6/ Give a brewery tour to children (no samples of course).

Pax.

Liam


Sound advice.

Laughing Dog
03-03-2011, 04:10 PM
here is a wonderful tip :eek:
if helping someone else that was running the DE Filter clean the DE filter make sure all the pressure is off the dome before pulling the safety pin then clamp latch!
I did not !! result quick trip to ER and emergency surgery on my left hand 4 inch ripped gash to the bone and shattered my wrist maybe one more surgery
The lesson from this? Write out all procedures and make sure everyone does everything the same way EVERY TIME ALL THE TIME DONíT GET IN A HURRY TO GO HOME AND SHORTCUT ANYTHING EVER

Fred
Laughing Dog Brewing

GlacierBrewing
03-03-2011, 05:31 PM
here is a wonderful tip :eek:
if helping someone else that was running the DE Filter clean the DE filter make sure all the pressure is off the dome before pulling the safety pin then clamp latch!
I did not !! result quick trip to ER and emergency surgery on my left hand 4 inch ripped gash to the bone and shattered my wrist maybe one more surgery
The lesson from this? Write out all procedures and make sure everyone does everything the same way EVERY TIME ALL THE TIME DONíT GET IN A HURRY TO GO HOME AND SHORTCUT ANYTHING EVER

Fred
Laughing Dog Brewing

Damn Fred! Hope you are doing a little better. Good tip though.
Prost!
Dave

Jephro
10-07-2011, 10:59 PM
Keeping your coffee warm with your Mash Tun

:cool:
..yes, thats a 16oz quad soy vanilla :eek:

7142

Jephro
10-31-2011, 05:43 PM
Just wanted to share with all you a pre-Halloween scare i had yesterday.

I had the CIP pump running a caustic cycle on a FV and just as i stepped around the corner into the office i heard a pop and a loud hissing sound. When i poked my head around the corner i saw a shower of caustic spraying from the outlet of the pump. Obviously i took shelter in the office until it finished spraying hot caustic all over the brewery but it scared the holy hell out of me. I will spare you my theories of how it may have happened but in my 11 years of professional brewing in 5 breweries with many brewers i have never seen a hose break free from what i was sure to be a properly seated clamp in that way. Fortunately i had just stepped out of range of the spray but from now on i will be double checking my clamps and pointing the elbow from the outlet of the pump towards a wall, or at least not in the direction i will be walking/working.

Anyway just wanted to share that in hopes it may prevent someone else from something similar, or worse, in the future. I know how easy it is to become over confident of your equipment and procedures.

Be safe out there ;)
Cheers

~jeff

GlacierBrewing
11-01-2011, 07:21 AM
Just wanted to share with all you a pre-Halloween scare i had yesterday.

I had the CIP pump running a caustic cycle on a FV and just as i stepped around the corner into the office i heard a pop and a loud hissing sound. When i poked my head around the corner i saw a shower of caustic spraying from the outlet of the pump. Obviously i took shelter in the office until it finished spraying hot caustic all over the brewery but it scared the holy hell out of me. I will spare you my theories of how it may have happened but in my 11 years of professional brewing in 5 breweries with many brewers i have never seen a hose break free from what i was sure to be a properly seated clamp in that way. Fortunately i had just stepped out of range of the spray but from now on i will be double checking my clamps and pointing the elbow from the outlet of the pump towards a wall, or at least not in the direction i will be walking/working.

Anyway just wanted to share that in hopes it may prevent someone else from something similar, or worse, in the future. I know how easy it is to become over confident of your equipment and procedures.

Be safe out there ;)
Cheers

~jeff

YIKES!
Funny, but this past year I have gotten in the habit of consciously NOT standing in front of my CIP pump's outlet when I switch it on. I have this vision of the hose popping off and hot acid jetting all over my legs!

Prost!
Dave

Jephro
11-01-2011, 05:29 PM
YIKES!
Funny, but this past year I have gotten in the habit of consciously NOT standing in front of my CIP pump's outlet when I switch it on. I have this vision of the hose popping off and hot acid jetting all over my legs!

Prost!
Dave

Yes sir, it has always been a thought in the back of my mind but has now moved to the front. If any of you have an outlet w/ a clamp and elbow on your CIP pump as most i have seen do, point that sucker away from your work area!! I also went through my manifold between the MT and BK and tightened all of the clamps, something i already do somewhat regurarly but will make it a point to so more often. The vibrations of a pump running will loosen anything threaded like clamps, screws, nuts and bolts over time.

A few weeks ago I also put a cap on the valve on the utility outlet on the manifold as i have always had a fear of being left open or failing when i start up a whirlpool. Just ask Teri Fahrendorf about how dangerous hot wort, or chems for that matter can be.

DFoster
11-02-2011, 06:54 AM
Don't talk or have your mouth open when squeegeeing the bottling room floor after a long run...especially when you're around the leak bucket area. I was talking yesterday and had a particularly large drop splash into my mouth. I've had a lot of nasty things happen to me at the brewery, but this one was particularly foul.

MikeRoy
11-02-2011, 07:48 AM
This reminds me of that fact that I have in the past turned on my pump briefly to check flow and verify solid connections without leaks before I added any chemical into the mix.

Just a thought as it might be a good procedure for some brewers out there.

Jephro
11-02-2011, 07:56 AM
This reminds me of that fact that I have in the past turned on my pump briefly to check flow and verify solid connections without leaks before I added any chemical into the mix.

Not to take anything away from your procedure Mike but... The thing about my mishap is that I had already run a 25 min acid cycle w/ no leaks and then switched over to caustic which ran for maybe 2 min before the fail.

Roger Greene
05-07-2012, 01:33 PM
i think we can all take a lesson from Klaus when it comes to safely operating a forklift.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-oB6DN5dYWo

fastricky
05-11-2012, 08:32 PM
i think we can all take a lesson from Klaus when it comes to safely operating a forklift.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-oB6DN5dYWo

Hahahaha!!!

gitchegumee
05-12-2012, 12:29 AM
For a real instructional video, they missed a very important first step to driving any forklift. What should Klaus have done before driving off in the beginning? Anyone?



That's right! He forgot to secure his safety belt.

kererubrewing
01-05-2013, 11:40 AM
High-visibility lock-outs on switches and valves along with a sign hanging at the access hatch to indicate there is a worker in a confined space that no one can easily see.

gitchegumee
01-05-2013, 06:59 PM
In the US, confined spaces require much more than this. Like a Scott Pack and a buddy outside the confined space with you on a harness and life line. Oxygen meter is also required. Unless you have a regular confined space entry program consistent with OSHA (that's lots of work), then forget about it. I am a firm believer that there is NO REASON to enter any confined space in a brewery. Everything should be proceduralized to avoid confined space entry. Just my 0.02.

TGTimm
02-20-2013, 03:53 PM
Know what and where the lock-outs are. Know how and when to use them. USE THEM.

Use GFCI breakers for everything that's near water, whenever possible. Have a talk with your electrician.

Think about what will happen if--when--Murphy strikes. I haven't seen a caustic shower from a dis-connected hose (yet), but I have seen one from a hose that lost its king nipple.

Be sure that the top fitting you're removing is on the fermenter you're cleaning--not the one beside it you just carbonated. Thank goodness we found that top fitting! Too bad about Verne's head....

Trust your senses. Use your eyes, of course, but also tune you ears and nose. Become intimately familiar with the sounds and smells of the facility when everything is going right, and be on the alert for any change. One employee pre-heating the mash tun reported to me that the HL "smelled funny". Yep, it smelled like refrigeration compressor oil. We had a 1-in-1,000,000 failure that resulted in compressor oil in the HL, and HL in the compressor. Dead compressor, but Verne saved us 10s of K$ in potentially ruined product. Too bad about that top fitting incident, Verne. We really do miss you.

Look out for the brewery cat when driving anything. Oh, well, there are lots of cats....

Climateboy
01-17-2014, 09:31 AM
A couple I've done...

When Sparging - make sure to open the valve into the kettle, otherwise the grant overflows very quickly.

Close the valve to drain the sight glass on your SV's when CIPing. Your pumps will thank you.

When dry hopping into a FV I recommend using a cut keg. You add hops to the keg, then let some beer from the FV into the keg - allow the hops to get wet, then shoot the whole mess into the FV using CO2. It works great and you don't have to climb a ladder every time you need to dry hop.

Can you elaborate on this please? Sounds like a great idea. How do you use CO2 to push the hop/wort mix into the FV?

Thanks,

James

OurMutualBrewer
01-21-2014, 11:36 AM
Take off your brewery's gear, put on a hat, and sit at the bar a couple nights a week. Go down the line and drink your beers in the setting your customers do, and eavesdrop on the people around you.

When you have had enough of that, strike up a conversation with the rando's that are drinking your beers and paying your bills.

Gotta keep stuff in perspective, the whole "Ive seen how the sausage is made" thing can really start to make you forget why you make beer in the first place!

MakeBeerNotWar
02-08-2014, 07:11 PM
For any triclamps that could cause injury if accidentally removed (ie on the tank side of HLT or caustic tank valves), especially those which are virtually permanent, replace the wingnuts with a stack of two hex nuts.

Do it now.

is_wiz
06-18-2014, 12:56 PM
- Learn how to do anything, and being willing to.

- Clean as you go,, hey they clean some more

- Don't listen to head phones

- If using heat exchanger inline while boiling ( to sanitize it ) don't be cooling it at the same time. Unless you want to see which is stronger your chiller or your heater. makes me think of a xmen movie clip

- Develop a check list, follow it, check it all the time.

BrewMage22
06-18-2014, 04:00 PM
-When operating keg washers and bottling lines, wear ear plugs! I've been brewing for 8 years and CO2 release/compressed air, and machine noise have DEFINITELY damaged my hearing

-Wear frickin eye protection when packaging and anytime you deal with hot liquids, chemicals or contents under pressure. I've seen tiny droplets of PAA and caustic on my specs and you best believe thats a medical emergency if you take a direct hit. And don't clean the things off with your sweaty shirt, invest in some optical wipes/cloth and keep them at your handy, highly visible, centrally located first aid station. Number 1 reason I see employees reluctant to wear them is cause they are scratched.

-NEVER open a valve without knowing what's behind it.

-NEVER run caustic cleaning on a tank filled with CO2, the caustic pulls CO2 into solution so fast it can create a vacuum and collapse the tank

Think about what can hurt you, other people, equipment, and product in that order.

Be safe!

Be proactive!

Its fun until someone gets hurt.

Cheers

roc-craven
06-19-2014, 07:57 AM
Never stick your fingers any place you wouldn't stick your wiener. Works in many different aspects of life.