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David Hicks
08-30-2009, 10:35 AM
Im In the market for some brewer's boots, ive never owned a pair before and am wondering what I should look for. What kind of height? Steel Toes? Is there any material that is better than the rest?

BrewinLou
08-30-2009, 11:04 AM
Boots are just a big bucket to hold lots of hot water. I have a pair of all rubber Birkies. They go on and off in seconds, and do not slip much at all.

tarmadilo
08-30-2009, 05:42 PM
After using big rubber boots for years, I wised up and got something like these LL Bean style boots:

http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/blogs/themoment/posts/duckboot.jpg

Worked great for me!

Tim

JMBrewer
08-30-2009, 06:42 PM
For general everyday wear, I use Timberland Pro 6" Waterproof boots.

http://s7.sears.com/is/image/Sears/067B0044000


For heavy cleaning and such, I use just some standard rubber boots.

http://images.asia.ru/img/alibaba/photo/51649314/Safety_Rubber_Boots.jpg

brewingnewbie
08-30-2009, 07:29 PM
if you work in slippery than normal conditions (slick floors, walking through kitchens, etc.) i like the shoes for crews brand guardian 3 boots. non-slip!, knee / shin high black rubber, steel toe, pretty decent support - $40

gitchegumee
08-31-2009, 02:14 AM
See also this thread:
http://www.probrewer.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=5748&highlight=boots

J.M.Martin
08-31-2009, 07:29 AM
Anyone who works with kegs (delivering, cleaning or filling) or is moving heavy equipment should wear steel toed boots. You can easily lose a toe by dropping a full keg on it and even dropping a empty one on your foot sucks.

jamie

Ted Briggs
08-31-2009, 08:59 AM
Muckboots.com
I use the Hoser 14", choose the chore-boot for steel toes; 12 or 14"
"I have a pair of all rubber Birkies." Wearing flipflops, Berkenstocks, Krocks or anythig like that is unsafe and should not be allowed in a brewery.

S.Brewer
08-31-2009, 09:53 AM
If you do go with rubber boots, it's also important to keep your feet dry and comfortable. With my first PPE issuing I got these blue booties called Bama Sokkettes that fit over your normal socks, and almost 10 years later I still wear them (not the same ones, they do wear out). They pad pretty comfortably (more so than regular sole inserts, IMHO) and help pull moisture away from your sweating feet. I'm not sure how widely distributed they are, but Sanderson Safety Supply (http://www.sandersonsafety.com/product_detail.cfm?pID=4814) in Portland, OR carries them. If you try them, just be sure to have boots that are 1/2 or 1 size larger than you'd normally wear to insure your feet aren't all scrunched up.
Good luck with finding the best foot coverings!

TL Services
09-02-2009, 01:02 AM
If you're using glass, eg. bottling, then it's a good idea to look for a pair with a steel mid-sole. That way you don't risk broken glass piercing the sole.

Just as an historical note, it was common to find boots with copper nails in breweries up until quite recently (I can remember them being used in yeast-handling areas when I joined the industry in the 1980's...).

The reason was that copper has a bactericidal effect, so prevented the spread of spoilage organisms from one area to another.

Copper or brass fittings have much the same effect :)

jrbeck
09-02-2009, 11:32 AM
I second the Muck Boots, safety toe version. Pretty comfortable, a little hot and sweaty if your brewery is in a warm climate, but tolerable with the right socks. They are tight around your calf to help prevent them getting filled with anything you spill. Lots of places sell them online. Every other shoe or boot I have worn has been worn down to nothing in about 6-9 months. Don't overlook the importance of socks as well. Good socks may seem overpriced at $10-15 a pair, but your feet will thank you for splurging.

Cheers,
Jason

Jephro
09-02-2009, 12:28 PM
I have to give a big second on the Timberland Pro series work boots, waterproof, non-slip, shank, and steel toe.
The ones i have have an abrasion resistant cover on the toe and back of the heel which also prevents cracking of the leather, and most of all they are Very Comfortable!!

Lex
09-02-2009, 02:23 PM
If you are blessed with extremely large & wide feet, rubber boots are damn near impossible to source. After many years of soggy hiking boots, I acquired a pair of Thorogood fireman boots in extra wide; they fit my Clydesdale hooves remarkably well, & are built to withstand hellish conditions. The downside is they weigh allot & are expensive, however I don't have the foot binding toe crushing sensation of medium width boots.

jrbeck
10-29-2009, 01:46 PM
Anyone ever worn these?
http://www.labsafety.com/search/Onguard+Industries/24544696/?type=brand

Insulated, PVC, steel toe, so could be good winter brewery boots.

Cheers,
Jason

Lex
10-29-2009, 02:27 PM
I had a pair of these for shoveling out a Pugsley mash tun; the double insulation kept the walking on hot coals sensation to a minimum. The only problem (aside from weight), is that they aren’t very tall so care must be taken while trudging around in the mash tun.

http://www.nexternal.com/useg/images/BlackMickyBoots2.jpg

bone yard
04-14-2010, 06:10 PM
I know a brewer that wears flip-flops.... idiot.

My 2c worth: I started off wearing gumboots, but it's hard to run from a deranged, psychopathic, gun-toting brewery owner in gummies. Plus I dropped a full keg on my big toe and it's gnarly and arthritic now.

So I moved to steel capped boots, and thought lace-ups were a good idea until I got boiling water and hot caustic down then in the same week. Couldn't get the bloody things off fast enough and now have an ugly scar on the same foot as my gnarly toe.

So, on to elastic sided, steel capped boots. Tried a lot of different brands (Oliver, Rossi, Red Back, T-Boots and Blundstones), but my favourite, and the only ones I buy these days, are Steel Blue 'Hobart'. Black of course; only winemakers and truck drivers wear brown boots.

http://www.steelblue.com.au/default.aspx?MenuID=64

http://www.buyboots.com.au/webshots/steel_blue_3121_01_hobart_with_toe_scuff_guard_saf ety_boots_106_480.jpg

Jephro
04-14-2010, 06:26 PM
So I moved to steel capped boots, and thought lace-ups were a good idea until I got boiling water and hot caustic down then in the same week. Couldn't get the bloody things off fast enough and now have an ugly scar on the same foot as my gnarly toe.

How did you manage to get Hot Water/Caustic in lace up boots? Were you wearing shorts?

After a 1.5 years I just bought my second pair of Timberland Pro (Totally waterproof, steel toe, nylon shank, oil/slip resistant soles, and as comfortable as my Birkenstock Clogs i'm wearing now). Wearing double front Cartharts and my Timberlands boiling wort can hit my shin and run down my leg and not burn me or get in my boots.

My old pair had a spot where the leather was starting to pull away from the sole, but they still did not leak. They just got too smelly for me after a year and a half of sweat, spent grain, and other funk.

bone yard
04-14-2010, 06:43 PM
Were you wearing shorts?

Yes. I might have a photo somewhere.

Jephro
04-14-2010, 06:55 PM
Yes. I might have a photo somewhere.
yeoouch! Sorry to hear man. I know a brewer with a Calvin Klein scar on his ankle from filling-up his rubber boots while brewing in shorts. The socks were made from natural fibers but the embroderied logo may as well have been a hot glue tatoo.

My worst enemy is the damn perlik zwickles, i cant count how many scars i have on my head- i should wear a hardhat.

bone yard
04-14-2010, 08:43 PM
Not so bad. Worst burn was from a hot liquor tank that overflowed whilst I was under it. Had to go to hospital for that one. Got my hand caught in a labeller too between a label cassette and a glue pallet. Had to wind the machine backwards to get my hand out (another trip to the hospital). Dangerous places breweries!

wildcrafter
04-15-2010, 08:47 AM
Custom Pink Boots for Mother's Day brewing? Swarovski crystals and all. Doc Martin boots. What's the Pink Boot Society wearing these days?:p

beerking1
04-19-2010, 11:04 AM
only winemakers and truck drivers wear brown boots.

And Naval Aviators!

Jephro
04-19-2010, 01:05 PM
only winemakers and truck drivers wear brown boots.



And Naval Aviators!

Well for me it either these or Chacos, and they won't let me wear chacos in the brewery. Ironically when i did wear sandals, birks actually for 3 years, in the brewery i never got burned by liquid or chems. Makes you much more aware fo your surroundings and it's easy to kick them off and spray off your foot. Not so smart if you deal with kegs, so i will stick with my Steel Toe "Brown Boots'.

Go NAVY!!- wait, What?:confused:

brewingnewbie
04-20-2010, 06:08 PM
shoes for crews guardian 3!

3 important qualities...steel toe, non slip, good support

http://www.shoesforcrews.com/sfc3/index.cfm?changeWebsite=US_en&route=c_store.viewDetailsOfProduct&partnumber=2061

ninedart
08-24-2013, 02:29 PM
I didn't know until a fellow brewing friend told me, that xtra tuffs are now made in china. I had a pair that made it two years and were over 100 bucks then but the brewery I am at currently gets them at cost practically and they only made it 4 months before getting a tear on the back and toe. The other boots they offer for free are total crap and I looked into a pair of lacrosse instead. I am also going to try the Bama Sokkets now. DO NOT WEAR BOOTS that are damp or uncomfortable. My current brewery took away our boot dryers and even with rotating between two pairs they were damp and gave a lot of us foot problems. They gave us a new boot dryer set up but it was too late for many of us to get foot problems.

ale boy
08-31-2013, 07:14 PM
Boots suck. Get waterproof running or hiking shoes

siebeer22
09-01-2013, 12:34 PM
Muck Boot Chore Cool is my boot of choice. Temp rating 0-90F really keep feet cool and dry.(I swear my feet sweat more in a pair of Vans) and has a nice beefy Vibram Sole on them.

I have had these babies for about 6 months now and I still loving them! Try them out
Cheers

thejiro
09-03-2013, 11:57 AM
I am using a pair of steel toed Red Wing Pecos boot. They are great non slip boots very breathebale they also fit in my pant legs so that gives an added layer of protection from liquid filling your boot. They are also mighty comfortable, I have low arches so I got an arch support insole to help out with that. They are still made in America and if you have a Red Wings retail location close to you they will oil and care for your leather free of charge.

eohanlan84
10-24-2013, 12:49 PM
The first thing I bought when I started brewing was a pair of red wing waterproof work boots, it took 9 months to completely demolish them.

Now I work with a combination of gortex marine boots I inherited and safety toe muck boots. They haven't let me down yet.

Starcat
10-24-2013, 02:45 PM
I have never fallen on my ass faster than when I had Mucks on. Possibly they make different soles for different purposes. They are typically a farm boot.

BH Tavern
11-17-2013, 08:50 PM
I have a high instep (difficult to pull boots on) and an extremely wide food (Redwings H), not too long (10-10.5). I wanted rubber / chemical resistant boots that were comfortable and came in widths. I had a revelation: Fireman's boots. Steel toe and shin, reinforced bottom (step on a nail? no prob) chemical resistant and water tight, while remaining extremely comfortable over the course of a day. They accept an orthodic footbed too. I cannot imagine a more comfortable and accident resistant boot than my Thorogood Hellfire boots. They also happen to look rad.

St Rippy
11-22-2013, 12:37 PM
I looked high and low for the correct boots. We are all very concerned about comfort, dryness, and most of all functionality. I found these and have never looked back. They will hold up to water, hot acid, hot caustic, hot wort, full keg of beer dropped on your toe, you get the point. They are extremely comfortable!! A little on the pricey side, but will likely be the last pair you buy for a long time.

http://www.rogansshoes.com/61830/i824552/574098/Safety-Toes/Georgia-Boot-6-Inch-EH-Waterproof-Steel-Toe-Work-Boot-G6633.html?infield=Brand:Georgia%20Boot#.Uo-vV-ItqCg

touchemandgetem
01-14-2014, 02:29 PM
Shoes for Crews are my favorite. Knee high, Very anti slip and comfortable.i have had a pair for 3 years now and they are just starting to go.

http://www.shoesforcrews.com/sfc3/index.cfm?changeWebsite=US_en&route=c_store.viewDetailsOfProduct&partnumber=2060

leotkowns
01-15-2014, 08:22 PM
In our brewery we all wear rubber steel toe boots. Its a small one so we rotate every job and swapping between lace up boots and rubber boots would be every 30 minutes. Plus scrubbing the kettle in 6" of PBW is a quick way to a boot full if not in high rubber boots. We all wore Xtratuf but have found they aren't even lasting 4 months without holes in them. We branched out this week and all bought a different brand. We are trying out the BOGS food pro extreme, MUCK chore, and the LaCrosse. So far my BOGS are comfy and the bottom has supper soft squishy tread like a snow tire. Its not very fitting around the calf or as flexible as the Xtratuf but im pleased with them so far. I did remove the insoles immediately and put in my Redback boots insoles. Time will tell.

wailingguitar
02-05-2014, 05:34 PM
I got a pair of these and am really happy with them. The only thing I don't like is that I wish they were higher. I have really wide feet… 9EEEE…. yes that's 4E… and waterproof boots are a pain in the ass to find. I ended up actually getting these in a 10 1/2 Wide. Strangely the length doesn't feel over long and the width is perfect. It's been really cold here lately (some days not reaching past 25F) and my feet have stayed warm and dry. The things are as comfortable as my New Balance walking shoes.

http://www.511tactical.com/atac-storm-boot.html

MP-Greg
07-12-2016, 09:29 PM
Just ordered a pair of the shoes for crews guardian IV the III's are limited in sizes so guess we will see how they hold up and do. Any advice on the best socks to keep the feet happy and not to hot in the summer time?

fihbkyle
07-13-2016, 08:44 AM
Just ordered a pair of the shoes for crews guardian IV the III's are limited in sizes so guess we will see how they hold up and do. Any advice on the best socks to keep the feet happy and not to hot in the summer time?

The best socks are never the cheapest socks. Hi quality performance wool will keep you nice and dry, but finding the ones thin enough to keep you cool is tough. There's wool socks out there designed for more athletic applications; I've heard SmartWool is a winner, maybe pick up a pair of those to try out?

MP-Greg
07-13-2016, 01:50 PM
The best socks are never the cheapest socks. Hi quality performance wool will keep you nice and dry, but finding the ones thin enough to keep you cool is tough. There's wool socks out there designed for more athletic applications; I've heard SmartWool is a winner, maybe pick up a pair of those to try out?

Sweet I'll check them out and give them a try thanks

hokus
07-13-2016, 02:02 PM
Check out these socks. I've using them for about a year. Thin so they keep you pretty cool and dry.

http://darntough.com/men/mens-lifestyle/silid-basic-crew-light

MP-Greg
07-13-2016, 06:46 PM
I will check out the darn toughs too maybe give them both a try thanks guys

MP-Greg
07-18-2016, 04:04 PM
No wool socks yet but my cottons in the guardian IV's worked out pretty well today and got to say they are no slip even while changing our glycol lines to a trunk system, my other leather boots stood no chance on the slick floors the guardians are comfy as hell too no foot fatigue all day great pair of boots for the price