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View Full Version : Polyurethane/Epoxy Recommendation Please



fastricky
08-22-2012, 09:24 AM
We've laid down concrete, it's cured and are ready to polyurethane the brew area. Is there a specific brand/product anyone can recommend?

For non brew areas, we'll put down epoxy. Any reco's on that appreciated too.

Danke!

almalkin
08-22-2012, 07:33 PM
We just had Poly-Crete installed, after doing a bunch of research regarding different flooring options. I can't say anything about the longevity of the material as it is so new, but it looks great and seems pretty tough so far.

I will say that getting the surface prep done properly and having an experienced installer will make a world of difference. This material can be tough to work with if you don't know what you are doing.

Feel free to PM me if you want more info or to see some pics.

-Steve

fastricky
08-23-2012, 02:52 PM
We just had Poly-Crete installed, after doing a bunch of research regarding different flooring options. I can't say anything about the longevity of the material as it is so new, but it looks great and seems pretty tough so far.

I will say that getting the surface prep done properly and having an experienced installer will make a world of difference. This material can be tough to work with if you don't know what you are doing.

Feel free to PM me if you want more info or to see some pics.

-Steve

PM'd, thanks Steve - Rich

Natrat
08-24-2012, 01:19 PM
Pro Chem makes a good 3 part system. Looks good, lasts for *evar.*

dick murton
08-27-2012, 09:46 AM
I'm not going to suggest names as I don't know who is available in your area. However, a couple of points

Make sure that you check exactly what the material will stand up to, in terms of temperatures, chemical types, strength and concentrations. There are cheapo systems out there that will not handle hot caustic for instance.

Make sure the person who lays it is a recognised / licensed contrator for the material otherwise the guarantees will be worthless from both the supplier and the installation contractor.

Even if you get what is supposed to cope, don't allow hot liquids (e.g. CIP fluids, steam, condensate, hot sterilising water) to run directly onto the material. Make sure this stuff runs into stainless or suitable plastic drains.

The material is not shock proof. If you are dropping kegs, you must use a cushion bag or similar. Simply fixing a plate over the resin to spread the shock doesn't work.

Once laid, never to drill through the stuff to fix anything down. No matter haow well you / they try to seal it, it won't, and once damp gets below the resin, it will lift eventually.

Oh yes, make sure there is a good fall to the drains as the laid resin is never completely flat, so you probably need a higher than expected fall.

But I still prefer it to tiles.

fastricky
08-29-2012, 09:07 AM
I'm still having a devil of a time knowing what to source specifically.

I did research this from Pro Chem:

http://www.procheminc.com/product_details.php?id=111&catid=3

Can anyone vouch for it or another product please? Thanks!

Fullcourt
08-29-2012, 08:14 PM
I'm still having a devil of a time knowing what to source specifically.

I did research this from Pro Chem:

http://www.procheminc.com/product_details.php?id=111&catid=3

Can anyone vouch for it or another product please? Thanks!

The description mentions "glossy'' twice. sound slippery to me. Also new concrete has to cure for 90 days before application. so after 90 days you have to clean and etch back to new condition, or the solvent will not stick.

I would find a surface at a local brewery that they and you like.

fastricky
08-30-2012, 10:29 AM
Success! This is the stuff I've been looking for:

http://www.surfacesolutionsusa.com/ucrete/ucrete-hp-hpq/

(Although the exact product is HS, not HP)