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toddbrew
07-11-2005, 02:26 PM
:rolleyes:
Ok, so I want to work in the brewing industry but here is the catch...I want to use my Japanese language skills too.
In October I will finish school with a bachelors in business and I will pass my Japanese exam for 2kyu (sorry, it is just a fluency grade)

Should I also get a brewing education??
I home brew now (who doesnt?) and I would like to get a cert. from american brewers guild or similar place anyway...

So i guess my question would be, what the hell could I do with brewing and Japanese?? suggestions??

toddbrew
07-13-2005, 08:41 AM
yeah, I am working on the Sake thing. I am going to brew some this winter and I am in corespondance with some brewers in Japan. The problem is no one here knows anything about making Sake and in Japan, there arent a lot of books on making Sake...it is all taught by doing. That is a tough scene to crack.
My initial plan would be to work in the brewing industry and do business with japan, and while I am there do as much research on Sake making as I can (i.e. brewery tours, meet with brewers etc.)
I guess it might take a while to perfect some product...Sake is hard to make well and consistent.

BTW, Go HERE (http://www.bairdbeer.com) for the best beer in japan.

tarmadilo
07-13-2005, 09:00 PM
I believe this is the largest sake brewery in the USA, a joint venture between a Japanese company and Coors, if I'm not mistaken...

Hakushika Sake USA
4414 Table Mountain Dr, Golden, CO
(303) 279-7253

Cheers, Tim

zbrew2k
07-14-2005, 07:25 AM
Making sake isnt too hard. Keeping it free of lactics is though. The hardest part is polishing the rice, and making the koji. Koji is a fungus grown on steamed rice. This is the part where it is hard to keep lactics out. The koji conatins all the enzymes for amylolysis so its the equivalent of malt in the brewin process. Each brewery has their own process and strain for making koji. Also their own process for conversion.

Making sake is fun, but my question is why? The market for it is miniscule!! Plus by the time you got the stuff bottled you couldnt make any money on it. There would be no margin. No market and no margin does not a successful business make.

Its not like you could make a Sake brewpub out of it either. Try drinking a pint of sake let alone several....18-20% alcohol. Not feasible.

So its a great idea, but I see it falling short on returns.

Now, about your idea for a career. If you like living in poverty ($10/hr) for the next 5-7 years learning to be a brewer, and then moving to Japan to possibly obtain "maybe" "one" job open...wow I call that a longshot. You would be much better off keeping brewing as a hobby, and using your language skills to find a real job in a business that would help you in the long run. Look in sales (import Japanese beer?) or something along that line.

It is difficult to get a long term work permit for Japan as well.

Good luck,
B