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triplenine
08-22-2006, 11:33 AM
Would it be possible to get a list of journals that regularly deal with fermentation science?
More specifically, has anyone seen much work regarding the interactions of Brettanomyces sp., Pediococcus sp. and Lactobacillus sp. in the souring of beers? PubMed results are mostly in relation to these microbes being seen as unwanted additions to the wine making process.
Hopefuly I will have found some better results by he time there are replies here - thanks for the help.

NZweazel
08-22-2006, 04:06 PM
Try the search engines on the following web sites.

ASBC.net
mbaa.com
ibd.org.uk

They have some very good articles ,especially the Master brewers website.

Good luck

crassbrauer
08-23-2006, 01:20 PM
There's an article that was published in Scientific American back in 1992 (I think) about lambic fermentation. I can't remember anymore how in-depth it went into each microbe's contribution, but the authors did try to chart what sets of microbes were active during what stage of the process. There are so many that I think they just wanted to give an overview of how the seeming free-for-all, which characterizes a lambic fermentation, takes place. I have the article somewhere, but I don't know if I can put my finger on it very quickly...

triplenine
08-25-2006, 01:31 PM
Well, I am finding a few things. Nothing really recent though. I found that SciAm article as well. I guess this might be a good research focus. From a microbial ecology/evolution perspective, I think this needs a better look. I wonder if the lack of information is just due to the overall lack of interest in these types of styles. It seems that these flavors are seeing a resurgence in popularity, so maybe more research will be forthcoming.

crassbrauer
08-25-2006, 04:01 PM
True lambics are so funky and weird (in a good way, if you like them :) ) that there's next to no market for them except for beer geeks and a decreasing number of die-hard locals, and since they can't really be brewed very well outside of the Senne River Valley (although many attempts have been made), it may not matter whether a resurgence in interest occurs or not. The output of Cantillion and the gang, I think, will be doing great just to remain constant. Their output has steadily decreased since the 60's. I'm hopeful yet realistic. It would be wonderful to be able to recreate passable lambic outside of Belgium, but how many brewers are that dedicated (3+ years for good gueuze). Also, working out the microbial goings-on, as stressed in the article, might be a bit pressing due to increasing pollution plus the additional kicker of global warming. Who knows? Soon they may be brewing lambic in Norway... ;)

analabor
09-11-2006, 11:07 PM
I'll post this elsewhere on the Forum because it should prove to be a robust reference place; the ASBC has started a Q&A Forum of its own and can help with professional brewing related inquiries.
A link on the home page (www.asbcnet.org) now has the Craft Brewers Community Page. It was buried, but the navigation has gotten more transparent. Here, you can ask a question and it will be routed through the ASBC by the moderators.
Also, search the Journal Abstracts and then contact the authors directly or get your library to print out a copy for a nominal fee (find a University student to download it for you.) Historically, there has been lots written on your organisms of interest.
Best,
Scott

Hofer
02-22-2007, 06:13 AM
Would it be possible to get a list of journals that regularly deal with fermentation science?
More specifically, has anyone seen much work regarding the interactions of Brettanomyces sp., Pediococcus sp. and Lactobacillus sp. in the souring of beers? PubMed results are mostly in relation to these microbes being seen as unwanted additions to the wine making process.
Hopefuly I will have found some better results by he time there are replies here - thanks for the help.

The closest thing to understanding lambic is a sourdough: the corporate result of "wild yeast" and lactobacilli working. One more common thing with lambic is that it is mostly european, by far rye bread that needs acidification.
Sourdough "wild" starters could have 200 and more types of bacteria: when analyzed these bacteria are index-numbered like B52.
At industry they use pure cultures exactly as in brewing but synthesize working starters with much lesser number of leading cultures.

Valleybrew
02-22-2007, 10:23 AM
Check out the book "Wild Beers" (or maybe its Wild Brews) it has a decent amount of information on Lambic production. It was recently published.

Valleybrew
02-22-2007, 10:24 AM
Whoops, got cut off. In the reference section of the book there are some good sources.
Steve

GarySped
02-23-2007, 06:06 AM
For these specialist articles you also need to consider Serious Science Journal Search engines. Many of these types of papers are published naturally from the Belgian research groups. Try Science direct .com and also your nearest Academic Library. You can often use their search engines for free. It may cost you an arm and a leg to obtain any necessary articles but at least you will know what is out there and the abstracts might answer the questions for you. Also try searching for Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry via the ACS website as I think you will find a wealth of papers there on many brewing and wine related issues. You will only get titles and abstracts again here. It is a start but keeping up with the literature today is not easy.

beertje46
02-23-2007, 07:01 AM
I still have this manual available. Someone make me an offer!

ASBC Methods of Analysis (http://probrewer.com/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=5584&highlight=ASBC)