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View Full Version : 10 BBL Unitank - Cleaning Volume



tweakingfrog
06-30-2017, 08:53 AM
I have my first 10BBL UniTank. What I am unsure of is how much volume of chemical I should load into the tank before circulating. I dont want to have too little or too much where the cone doesnt get clean. Is there a certain volume that is a good rule of thumb or x gallons per gallon of tank? Any help is appericiate

dick murton
06-30-2017, 11:58 AM
Use a standalone CIP set with separate delivery and scavenge pumps to ensure the cone is clear at all times, or can at least be scavenged dry regularly during the clean. If it is flooded, it soaks but doesn't clean effectively. Its like leaving a burnt pan in a bowl of hot water otherwise. Sure, it softens the dirt after a while, but doesn't remove it. And if there is dirt on the surface, you cannot sterilise it.

tweakingfrog
07-03-2017, 01:27 PM
Use a standalone CIP set with separate delivery and scavenge pumps to ensure the cone is clear at all times, or can at least be scavenged dry regularly during the clean. If it is flooded, it soaks but doesn't clean effectively. Its like leaving a burnt pan in a bowl of hot water otherwise. Sure, it softens the dirt after a while, but doesn't remove it. And if there is dirt on the surface, you cannot sterilise it.

Unfortunately I will not be using a standalone CIP. What would the volume used to circulate in the tank?

grnis
07-03-2017, 01:57 PM
Even if we knew the diameter and length of your hoses, pipes and tank dimensions it would still be difficult to answern that.

Like Dick said, get a CIP scavenge pump at least and if possible use a production pump for CIP supply, if you don't want to get a dedicated CIP supply pump.

Sooner or later you will run into infection problems.

TGTimm
07-03-2017, 03:36 PM
Cleaning a ferm without a stand-alone CIP system is very dependent on the design of your ferm. One thing to consider is how much fluid it takes in the cone to prevent a whirlpool from forming, sucking air into the pump, and causing cavitation. This is easiest to determine by trial-and-error. A cavitating pump will not move liquids at all!