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OGBrewer76
08-16-2017, 05:02 PM
I could use some advice here folks.
We filled out kegs thinking we were at 2.9 Volumes CO2, come to realize we filled at 113.5PSI and our kegs are super over-carbonated. Not quite sure how to de-pressurize these kegs. Thoughts? We have the proline keg fillers from GW Kent, if that helps at all. And yes, the Zham Negel has been ordered.
Thanks
John

mswebb
08-16-2017, 06:38 PM
your kegs are at 113psi?

You should have keg couplers with a pressure relief valve on had or coupler sized ball valves.

If you don't have these items, borrow them from another brewery and get the pressure down. Don't know what the ratings on your keg are but I'd be surprised if it's that high and you may have reduced the integrity of the keg.

UnFermentable
08-16-2017, 10:03 PM
your kegs are at 113psi?

You should have keg couplers with a pressure relief valve on had or coupler sized ball valves.

If you don't have these items, borrow them from another brewery and get the pressure down. Don't know what the ratings on your keg are but I'd be surprised if it's that high and you may have reduced the integrity of the keg.

Yea, if they are at 113psi you have some bombs out there. You would be best off degassing these IMMEDIATELY!

The stainless kegs are only rated to 60psi, and they have no relief valves. If you drop one of those suckers, look out, that's very dangerous. You shouldn't have a need for any regulators set that high.

New stainless kegs from Franke and similar have laser cut burst disks in the bottom area, but I think those will rupture well below 113 psi.

I'm hoping this is a typo and you meant 13.5psi. No problem, do like mswebb says.

You know a guy at Redhook dies from an exploding plastic keg? I'd hate to see how many would be effected by stainless. Always check your regulator pressure, it could cost more than your time.

OGBrewer76
08-17-2017, 08:38 AM
So sorry. That was a typo on my behalf. There was an extra "1" in that number. it should have been 13.5, not 113.5. I think there would have been bodily damage at that point, either by the brite tank exploding or the keg itself.

In any case, the solution I will be implementing today once I gt the barb fittings is to extend the draft line by 6" using 3/8" ID tubing to increase pressure by 3#. That should offset the extra carbonation in the kegs.
Thanks!
John

UnFermentable
08-17-2017, 10:54 PM
OGBrewer76,
Glad to hear that was just a typo! But since I had already composed a long-ish reply based on your original post, asking numerous questions and in order to clarify a few things in the posts above, Iíll at least present a shortened version of my reply here:

Regarding some of the comments made already:

Typically, wash/fill couplers are not equipped with relief valves like dispensing couplers are. The reason for this is: relief valves are in a part of the coupler (gas inlet) that is not intended to see product and when used in a situation like keg filling or washing, where they are constantly exposed to beer or chemicals, the non stainless parts can be degraded, and they also are difficult to clean and sanitize, creating a risk for microbial contamination.

Stainless steel kegs do have a maximum working pressure of 60 psig (I have seen some which list 45). That working pressure should never be exceeded. However, it should be noted that stainless steel kegs, depending on standards of construction typically have a test pressure that is many times higher. You should check with your manufacturer to find out the test pressure on your kegs. It is my understanding that the burst disks found on some newer kegs have a design burst pressure of 35 bar +/- 5 bar. Again, you should confirm with your manufacturer. The only way to reach these sorts of pressures in a keg in normal operations is by exposure to freezing or fire.

Were your kegs filled to overflow (overfilled)? This further exacerbates a bad situation by removing any cushioning head space in your kegs. Kegs that are completely filled with liquid are not as dangerous as when they are partially or completely filled with compressed gas; however, if the beer is warmed post-packaging in a keg filled 100% full of beer it will result in hydraulic pressure on the keg and valves that can cause damage.

I hope this info is meaningful and/or helpful to readers of this thread.

Cheers,


Steve Bradt
Sales Associate, Packaging Division
Micro Matic LLC
sbradt@micro-matic.com

Nicely said Steve!

It has been my experience in other industries that high pressure cylinders and tanks are generally tested to 5/3 rds working pressure as a standard. That is to say if a manufacturer does not specify. Used to do lots of hydrostatic testing in other fields.

I appreciate the well written and detailed info!