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Thread: size matters :)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Cortland
    Posts
    56

    size matters :)

    What is the limitations on a 15bbl system with 3 - 5 fermenters per year? just loking for a rough estimate.

    Thanks & Cheers
    Dan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Florence, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    350
    First, what are you brewing? Ales generally ferment in 15 - 17 days. Given that and the minimum of 3 fermentation tanks, another question arises. How many different styles are you going to brew and what storage do you have available? Are you kegging or racking to serving vessels?

    Assuming:

    15bbl brewhouse, 3 - 15 bbl fermentation tanks

    You brew one batch of Ale every 8 days. You will always have one fermentation tank ready to fill, however you will be brewing, cleaning and racking to storage on the same day....long brew days. You will have produced about 675 bbl at years end, not taking into consideration spoiled batches that are dumped.

    Cheers!!

    Scott M

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    sizing

    HI:

    David Pierce posted the text below some time ago.
    I'm sure it will be helpfull to you.

    Cheers,

    Fred



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    System Sizing from the Specific Mechanical website. I'm sure most reputable manfacturers websites use a similar version:



    Calculation of Annual Production

    System Size (Brewhouse Size) x Number of brews per week x 50 weeks per year = Annual Production

    Example :10 Barrels (bbls) x 3 brews/week x 50 weeks/year = 1500 bbls/year

    Calculation of No. of Fermenters Required

    Desired Annual Production = No. of Fermenters (to meet desired annual production)
    (Brewhouse Size x Vessel Cycles/year)

    Sizing for a Brewpub - Example

    Parameters:
    "1000 barrels per year; 75% Ales, 25% Lagers"
    50 brewing weeks / year
    14 Day Ales / 28 Day Lagers with full fermentation in fermenters
    Ales - 25 cycles / fermenter / year (50 brewing weeks / 2 week fermentation)
    Lagers - 12.5 cycles / fermenter / year (50 brewing weeks / 4 week fermentation)
    6 beers on tap

    Calculate system size and number of fermenters

    For example
    3.5 barrel system 1000 barrels / year / 3.5 barrel system / 50 brewing weeks/year = 5.8 brews per week
    7 barrel system 1000 barrels / year / 7 barrel system / 50 brewing weeks/year = 2.9 brews per week
    10 barrel system 1000 barrels / year / 10 barrel system / 50 brewing weeks/year = 2 brews per week
    15 barrel system 1000 barrels / year / 15 barrel system / 50 brewing weeks/year = 1.3 brews per week

    Comment - One must look at the labor component in selecting a system size.
    Most properly sized brewpubs brew 2 - 3 times per week in their first couple of years of operation.
    "Brewing less than twice a week, the system may have been oversized to start with."
    "Brewing more than 3 times a week, the system may have been initially undersized."
    "For this example, either the 7 or 10 barrel system is recommended."

    Number of fermenters required
    Projected: 750 bbls Ales (75%) & 250 bbls Lagers (25%)

    For 7 barrel system
    Ales ------> 750 bbls / year / (7 bbls x 25 cycles/year) = 4.2 = 5 Fermenters
    Lagers ----> 250 bbls / year / (7 bbls x 12.5 cycles/year) = 2.8 = 3 Fermenters
    Total -----> 7 - 8 Fermenters to produce 750 bbls Ales and 250 bbls Lagers

    For 10 barrel system
    Ales ------> 750 bbls / year / (10 bbls x 25 cycles/year) = 3 Fermenters
    Lagers ----> 250 bbls / year / (10 bbls x 12.5 cycles/year) = 2 Fermenters
    Total -----> 5 Fermenters to produce 750 bbls Ales and 250 bbls Lagers

    Number of Serving Vessels ; Equals number of desired beer styles one wishes to serve via tank to tap.
    Note number of beer styles may increase through kegging and/or bottling.

    System Recommendation : 10 barrel system with 5 x 10 barrel fermenters and 6 x 10 barrel serving tanks.
    Selecting the 10 barrel system over the 7 barrel system has the following benefits:
    -good utilization of manpower (2 brews per week)
    -reduced floor space (5 fermenters vs. 8 fermenter)
    -better priced / more economical (fewer fermenters)
    -better expansion capabilities
    -meets all system requirements

    **Note: Double sized fermenters (and conditioning tanks) may half the number of vessels required to meet annual production.
    **Note: All calculations assume 50 brewing weeks per year**
    __________________
    Proost,
    David R. Pierce
    Director of Brewing Operations
    Bluegrass Brewing Co.
    BBC Beer Co.
    Louisville, KY

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    993
    For a down and dirty calculation of capacity:
    Take total fermentation capacity: 3 x 15 bbl. = 45 bbl. times 365 days in a year divided by cycle time.

    Three Unitanks: (45 x 365)/14 day cycle = 1173 bbl. max. annual production
    Five Unitanks: (75 x 365)/14 = 1955 bbl. max. annual production

    or an average of 391 bbl/year per 15 bbl. unitank maximum.

    These estimates are max. production. To hit these #'s you need to have a proper amount of serving tanks/cooperage/packaging to turn the tanks every 14 days.
    Cheers & I'm out!
    David R. Pierce
    NABC & Bank Street Brewhouse
    POB 343
    New Albany, IN 47151

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Helena, Montana
    Posts
    292
    Dan,

    Without going through the math of the more specific methods mentioned above, I'll relate our personal experience to you.

    We have spent the last 4 years with a 15 bbl brewhouse, 4x 15 bbl fermenters and 5x 15bbl conditioning tanks. We would spend about 7-10 days in fermentation, and about the same in conditioning. We brew primarily ales and don't filter. 2,000 bbls was about the most we could do in a year.

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