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Thread: Krausening, kegging and yeast count

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal, QC
    Posts
    160

    Krausening, kegging and yeast count

    I want to referment my beer in kegs by adding a fresh yeast starter and some source of sugar. Will I obtain similar results by adding dextrose rather than gyle?

    Should I use the required amount of yeast to ferment that sugar, or should I slightly overpitch since it'll be an alcoholic environment?

    I plan to mix everything in a in a tank, then quickly keg everything.

    Nay other things I should take into consideration

    PS: why am I doing this? Answer: In an attempt to reabsorb diacetyl. See this thread if interested

    Zb
    Last edited by Zucker Bee; 02-16-2009 at 11:44 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    Kräusening

    HI:
    BALLING used empirical measurements to determine the amount of CO2 formed from Glucose
    2.0665 g of Glucose è 1 g of Ethanol + 0.9565 of CO2 + 0.11 g of losses
    2.16 g of Glucose è 1.0455 g of Ethanol + 1 g of CO2 + 0.12 g of losses
    This shows us that for every gram of CO2 we want in our Beer, we will need 2.16 grams of Glucose

    WHAT IS THE OBJECTIVE?
    We know what beer style we Bottle conditioning; we know the CO2 level required of that particular style – now, how to we get there?
    4 grams of Sucrose/L will give us 1 Vol CO2
    4 grams per Liter = 1/3 oz / US gal
    Example:
    Let’s say we want 2.4 Vol CO2 for our Beer
    Innitial CO2 level 0.9, which means we need 1.5 VOL CO2
    1.5 X 4 = 6 grams /Liter (0.8 oz/US gal) priming sugar is needed
    1.We know how much CO2 we got in our beer to be used.
    2.We know that 2.16 g of Glucose per Litre will give one gram of CO2.
    3.Our Beer has 2.0 g/L of CO2
    We want 4.0 g/L of CO2
    we have to add 2.0 g/L of CO2
    We need 2.16 g X 2.0 = 4.32 grams of Glucose/L of Beer to get an extra 2 g/L of CO2 into the Beer.
    NOW, that’s per Liter!

    If we have a 5 gallon batch (18.9 Liter)
    We need 18.9 X 4.32 = 81.6 g Glucose in that batch

    Cheers

    Fred Scheer

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal, QC
    Posts
    160
    Thanks Fred

    The tough part was to estimate what amout of C02 is actually still in my filtered beer. I figured 0,8, since it was filtered yesterday.

    I've decided to go with krausening technique rather than with dextrose.

    I've taken in account the calculation you've demonstrate and introduced a attenuation % since I now my wort is not pure glucose and won't attenuate much more more than 75-77% I also considered the actual gravity of my krausen wich is not made from the same wort... some calculations!

    So, I pushed 45 litres @ 16,5P West Coast IPA in my Belgian Blonde... Should be quite interesting or should I say funny!

    2,8 - 3,0 CO2 volume is what I'm shooting for for a total of 550 liters

    Cheers!

    Zb

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    krausening

    Hey, 2.8 - 3 Vol Co2 sounds a bit high.
    Are you going to bottle?? =====> I recommend 2.3 - 2.5 Vol CO2
    Are you kegging =======> 2.2 CO2 Vol
    Are you serving "in House" =======> 2.4 Vol CO2

    Fred

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal, QC
    Posts
    160
    We do serve our Belgian ales at 2,6 and Saisons at 2,8 - 3,0 on tap

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