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Thread: Sieve shaker balls

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lawrence, KS
    Posts
    218

    Sieve shaker balls

    We recently acquired a sieve shaker and a full set of sieves. My recollection is that you are supposed to include some small rubber balls in the sieves when you shake them. Can anyone tell me:

    Size, weight and/or composition of the balls

    How many per sieve

    Do you put them in all the sieves?

    How long does ASBC method suggest shaking for?

    optimal sample size for 8" sieves

    Many thanks,
    Steve Bradt
    Free State Brewing Co.
    Lawrence, KS

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
    Posts
    1,621
    ASBC method uses 8" sieves in #10, 14, 18, 30, 60, & 100 mesh sizes plus the pan. It specifies the use of three 5/8" rubber balls (weight not given) on each of the #30, 60, & 100 for a total of nine balls. Sieves are covered and shaken for 5 minutes. Balls are "Screwballs", obtainable from H.R. Williams Mill Supply, Kansas City, MO. Make sure you get a representative sample with the mill at full load. Acceptable grist samples are between 100-130g. Good luck!
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--
    Worldwide Brewery Installations
    www.GitcheGumeeBreweryServices.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    993
    Quote Originally Posted by gitchegumee
    Make sure you get a representative sample with the mill at full load. Acceptable grist samples are between 100-130g. Good luck!
    Also sample at the point of use i.e. mash-tun after grist handling system.
    Cheers & I'm out!
    David R. Pierce
    NABC & Bank Street Brewhouse
    POB 343
    New Albany, IN 47151

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
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    Actually the method specifies sampling at the mill chute. I can see the use of measuring at the tun, but I think this method targets mill performance. Mills often have built-in triers that make sampling fairly straightforward. It seems difficult to get representative, homogeneous samples from a grist case.
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--
    Worldwide Brewery Installations
    www.GitcheGumeeBreweryServices.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    993
    Quote Originally Posted by gitchegumee
    Actually the method specifies sampling at the mill chute. I can see the use of measuring at the tun, but I think this method targets mill performance. Mills often have built-in triers that make sampling fairly straightforward. It seems difficult to get representative, homogeneous samples from a grist case.
    Yes, sample at the mill chute to judge mill performance. Two roll mills with sampling tiers are the exception, not the rule in most small operations. Isn't the ultimate goal to achieve an ideal grist in the mash tun? Sampling at the point of use i.e. mash tun (not the grist case) will give you an indication of how well your grist handling is treating your perfectly milled malt. In long screw or flex auger systems the likelihood of your malt experiencing further mechanical "milling" is high. You may need to mill a bit coarser to achieve proper grist composition at the point of use. The ASBC method you describe is correct for judging mill performance. I do collect a larger sample, 200-250 grams, and shake longer. Good luck.
    Cheers & I'm out!
    David R. Pierce
    NABC & Bank Street Brewhouse
    POB 343
    New Albany, IN 47151

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