Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Light Beer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    Smile Light Beer

    Hi
    Just a question for all the Brewer-Lawyers out there, or here on the Forum.

    I'm wondering if their are any legal issues with the name use
    "LIGHT, or LITE BEER"?

    If a Brewer uses enzymes in the process, do they have to be on the label?

    Just wondering.......................

    Txs

    Fred

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    672
    Or are you asking if Miller will come knocking on your door if you use Lite. I think you would be home free with light but you may run into an issue using Lite.
    Joel Halbleib
    CBO "Chief Brewing Officer" / Zymurgist
    Bluegrass Brewing Co
    636 East Main St
    Louisville, KY
    www.bluegrassbrewing.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Chandler, AZ
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by BrewinLou
    Or are you asking if Miller will come knocking on your door if you use Lite. I think you would be home free with light but you may run into an issue using Lite.
    I was just looking that up myself, even though I don't think that's what he meant. I found (and I seemed to remember hearing) that Miller lost their fight to preserve trademark of the spelling of "Lite" in an appellate decision. I don't think you'd have to worry about SAB Miller knocking on your door any time soon if you use that spelling.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Copenhagen
    Posts
    269

    light

    I always though it's a caloric issue. That is, if you call something "Light" you have to be able to prove it has less calories....that is just my initial thought. I could be wrong and it's just a description with nothing to it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    St. Louis, mo
    Posts
    59
    I guess it depends if you are packaging it. If you are, you'll have to meet the TTB's standards for the label.

    Here's a link to the TTB's FAQ(http://www.ttb.gov/rulings/2004-1_faq.shtml).

    Basically, if you use the phrase "Light" and it refers to caloric content you can print it as long as you provide a statement of average analysis on the label. They also refer to "Light" and "Lite" interchangeably in another pamphlet, so I assume there is no particular restriction there.

    You could also use a variation of the phrase "lower" or "reduced" carbs if you are referring to it as being lower than one of your other specific products, and as long as you print a statement of average analysis on the label as well. If you use "low carbohydrate" however, there you must be less than 7 grams per 12 oz or you're in violation. That one's got a legal definition behind it.

    If it's just going across the bar, I would assume that you wouldn't have to be as exact. But in the interest of customer education, you could offer them the best info you can.

    Also, I don't think the disclosure of the use of enzymes is required. The production of "light" beer on the macro level often includes the addition of enzymes (syntheticly and naturally derived) and they don't declare their usage as far as I can tell.
    Last edited by MJMurphy; 08-24-2009 at 09:55 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    802
    The production of many, many beers on an Industrial scale involves enzymes of one sort or another (not from the yeast or malt). Obviously no need to declare them.

    Would love to see all brewers list all of their ingredients on their labels. Would also love to see nutritional labelling on beer. Alas, it will never happen.

    Liam

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Chandler, AZ
    Posts
    209
    Quote Originally Posted by liammckenna
    The production of many, many beers on an Industrial scale involves enzymes of one sort or another (not from the yeast or malt). Obviously no need to declare them.

    Would love to see all brewers list all of their ingredients on their labels. Would also love to see nutritional labelling on beer. Alas, it will never happen.

    Liam
    To what extent, though? Do we include all brewing salts, acid additions (for those who acidify their liquor), kettle clarifiers, etc.? Commercial enzymes aren't listed because it's assumed that they are denatured and precipitated in the boil.

    Now, nutritional labeling is fine as long as you can legally make some assumptive calculations, but if you need analysis equipment to accurately calculate the info, that could be quite cost prohibitive for a small brewery. In the case of a large brewery, though, who already has the labs, equipment, & information for their beers I say yes, they should print that information. Then people will finally compare for themselves the actual difference between a regular and light beer.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    802
    See this link for my feelings on labelling.

    Pax.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Chandler, AZ
    Posts
    209
    Liam,

    I agree with you that breweries should list more of their ingredients. Here in Costa Rica, if a colorant is used, for example, it has to be listed in the ingredients. It's a shame that it's not more common (or more mandated) in North America, and I always appreciate breweries that list their ingredients on their labels, even when they over-emphasize certain aspects (like how "virgin" or "clean" their water source is, OK, I get it, there's clean water in Colorado or in the middle of Oregon, can we drop it already?). I still think that there should be a line drawn as to how much information to list, though. Some of the things you listed are completely reasonable, but some I don't necessarily agree.

    BTW, I totally agree with you regarding the Reinheisgebot. I've always felt that was merely handcuffs to creativity, much like the wine appellations of France.

    Cheers!

    --Gabe

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •