Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Belgian IPA

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Somersworth, NH
    Posts
    133

    Belgian IPA

    Two school of thoughts on this new and growing style.
    1) An IPA made with Belgian Yeast vs.
    2) A beglian like Bel. Pale with increased hop charecter.

    Opinions on how people have approached this in the past is all Im looking for.

    Thanks.
    "Uncle" Frank
    Frank Fermino
    Brewer I, Redhook, Portsmouth, NH
    Writer, Yankee Brew News, New England
    Wise-ass, Everywhere, Always

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Hyattsville,MD
    Posts
    281
    Approach it going forward with extreme caution. If you come across any resistance treat it with extreme prejudice.


    Just like you've mentioned there are two schools of thought....more perhaps if you get technical.

    1. Belgian-style IPA, hopped with common hops found in the region ( Belgian that is) and a yeast strain of Belgian origin.

    2. Belgian-American IPA, hopped with Pacific Northwest hops( hopefully citrus ones) and a yeast strain of Belgian origin.

    I like both, so I say do both at some time. If you've had fresh Orval in Belgium then you know what I mean.
    Cheers,
    Mike Roy
    Brewer
    Franklin's Restaurant,Brewery & General Store
    Hyattsville,MD

    Franklinsbrewery.com
    @franklinsbrwry
    facebook.com/franklinsbrewery
    Franklinsbrewery.blogspot.com

  3. #3
    youngbuckbrewer Guest

    "Belgian Style IPA"

    "Belgian Style" IPA

    First of all IPA is not a Belgian style beer historically so I believe you should make an American base beer ( AMerican hops and maybe even malts) with a Belgian yeast strain. I have made them with European hops and also with NWest hops and have found that the American hops combined with the Belgian Yeast characters sold the best. But that is just one brewers take on this rapidly growing style.



    Michael Uhrich
    Carter's Brewing
    Billings, Montana

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Amherst, MA USA
    Posts
    298

    I thought at the time I was bring an original

    When I first brewed Hop Goddess at Offshore Ale, I knew it would be first time anyone on Martha's Vineyard would ever have a hop forward belgian inspired ale. There really isn't alot of super fresh orval coming on the ferry.

    My thought was and still is... lots of belgian pils malt, NO caramel malts!!!, both amer. and european hops mostly flavor, aroma, and even more for dry hopping. plus.. I added a brett slurry i had going for the first few batches I brewed. those first batches were stellar, IMO. This beer was super dry and floral and fruity. I think I let the ferment temp hit 85. tasty goddess she was.

    Matthew
    ________________
    Matthew Steinberg

    Brewer
    High Horse
    Amherst, MA

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Holly Springs, NC
    Posts
    31
    I know I am a homebrewer right now but I have brewed three variations of Belgian IPA and according to what others have told me they have each been a huge hit. I was pleased with each rendition as well. I comprised the grain bill with Franco Belges Pils, Munich, Aromatic for each time. I hopped two versions with Mags then Saaz/Amarillo combination. I also did a Chinook Willamette/Cascade combination too. I fermented each beer with the Belgian Ardennes yeast 3522 and they were outstanding. I just served the Chinook Will/Casc rendition at a homebrew festival on Saturday and it was one of the top two beers. Hope this helps. Its a great style that I really love as well.

    Cheers

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    142
    Wow. My first thought is what the hell for? But, now that I think about it if you got the right yeast flavor with a balance! of spicy hops it could really. Im wondering, Lachouffe yeast warm fermentand 75+ with northern brewers and simcoes. Dry hop with t he later. Spice city. I would be apprehensive to go over 50 - 55 IBU. Orval is nice but IPA it ain't. Let us know about this. Thanks JS

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Somersworth, NH
    Posts
    133

    the result

    well, I needed an IPA and I have some belgian yeast on hand, AND an open fermenter (a rare thing). So I did a 14 bbl batch and split it putting 7 bbls in one fermenter with my house yeast fermenting at 68 and the other 7 bbls with the belgian yeast fermenting at 74. Hops used were Spalt, Chinook, E. Kent Golding, Willamette, Cascade, and Simcoe. Six additions for 80 IBU's. I will dry hop with Saaz. Results in about 2 weeks. Thanks for the feedback. Cheers!
    "Uncle" Frank
    Frank Fermino
    Brewer I, Redhook, Portsmouth, NH
    Writer, Yankee Brew News, New England
    Wise-ass, Everywhere, Always

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    387
    I've done both ways as well. Personally I liked the version with European hops quite a bit more. I think I used saaz and magnum. The hops seemed to compliment the yeast's spiciness and phenolics better than when I used American style columbus/centennial.The American style seemed like a fight between the Belgian yeast and the agressive hops. Im sure different yeast strains would make a big difference to.
    Big Willey
    "You are what you is." FZ

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    208

    Question Belgian IPA

    I'm trying to decide on a yeast strain. Obvious choice I guess would be
    WLP550 Belgian Ale Yeast from Whitelabs. Any thoughts or suggestions ?

    Tariq
    Tariq Khan (Brewer/Distiller)

    Yaletown Brewing and Distilling Co.
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Canada

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Holly Springs, NC
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by tariq khan
    I'm trying to decide on a yeast strain. Obvious choice I guess would be
    WLP550 Belgian Ale Yeast from Whitelabs. Any thoughts or suggestions ?

    Tariq
    I have to give a vote for Wyeast 3522 Belgian Ardennes. Great attenuation with great Belgian flavor that meshes well with hop flavors and aroma.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Vancouver, B.C. Canada
    Posts
    208

    Question Belgian IPA

    Quote Originally Posted by nchomebrewer
    I have to give a vote for Wyeast 3522 Belgian Ardennes. Great attenuation with great Belgian flavor that meshes well with hop flavors and aroma.

    I've never used it before but heard from other brewers that it can be a bit on the sweet side. thoughts ?

    T
    Tariq Khan (Brewer/Distiller)

    Yaletown Brewing and Distilling Co.
    Vancouver, B.C.
    Canada

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    49
    Quote Originally Posted by tariq khan
    I've never used it before but heard from other brewers that it can be a bit on the sweet side. thoughts ?

    T
    I've never had it end sweet. That yeast is a monster and likes to tear through beers. I would recommend converting pretty high, i.e. 158-160 if you're looking for a beer with body. It's very attenuative.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Holly Springs, NC
    Posts
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by theburden
    I've never had it end sweet. That yeast is a monster and likes to tear through beers. I would recommend converting pretty high, i.e. 158-160 if you're looking for a beer with body. It's very attenuative.
    Yes this yeast is very attenuative. I have mashed all of my IPA's at around 148-150 and gotten an FG of around 1.010-.012 but thats what I intended. I did just brew a Dark Strong that I mashed at 154 but its fermenting now so we will see how low the FG gets and the fermentation since friday has been plenty violent as well. I would agree to mash high if you want a sweeter beer since I have never seen this yeast finish high as well.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    London, United Kingdom
    Posts
    181
    Hi,

    I was lucky enough to get a tour of Westmalle a few years back. The Production Director furnished our group with a few bottles of the "monks beer" which was made from the 2nd runnings of the tripel I believe....

    Very pale (assume they use only pale malt in the tripel), very dry, very highly carbonated (bottle conditioned of course), and very very bitter and hoppy - probably somewhere in the 40 something... and about 5%ABV I think. Maybe not the level of bitterness some of you might be after, but that attenuation + bitterness = one fantastic beer!

    Anyway, theres a thought for you..... belgian yeast, high attenuation, high carbonation, (relatively) high bitterness.....

    Cheers,

    Alex

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    6
    Every american-made belgian-style ipa ive had seemed to be: Belgian-style Tripel + high level myrcene hops late in boil. Though, i would encourage any deviation, most notably the addition of spices, herbs, orange peel, etc.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •