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Thread: International Aromatic Unit

  1. #1
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    International Aromatic Unit

    How come there is not one? The equipment is there to do it. It changes drastically over time, so does bitterness. With the popularity of APA, IPA, DIPA, and the IIPAs there should be.
    Joel Halbleib
    CBO "Chief Brewing Officer" / Zymurgist
    Bluegrass Brewing Co
    636 East Main St
    Louisville, KY
    www.bluegrassbrewing.com

  2. #2
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    Jul 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrewinLou
    How come there is not one? The equipment is there to do it. It changes drastically over time, so does bitterness. With the popularity of APA, IPA, DIPA, and the IIPAs there should be.
    Go ahead and invent one. You have a gas chromagraph at BBC don't you?
    Shouldn't you be brewing beer?
    HK

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by HinduKush
    Go ahead and invent one. You have a gas chromagraph at BBC don't you?
    No, but there are several friendly distillers a 20 minute drive away that do, and they like beer too. Hmmm
    Joel Halbleib
    CBO "Chief Brewing Officer" / Zymurgist
    Bluegrass Brewing Co
    636 East Main St
    Louisville, KY
    www.bluegrassbrewing.com

  4. #4
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    Jul 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrewinLou
    No, but there are several friendly distillers a 20 minute drive away that do, and they like beer too. Hmmm
    Big as you guys are and you don't have one in your lab? What do you use for ibu, color, abv, etc?
    Shouldn't you be brewing beer?
    HK

  5. #5
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    Dallas, TX
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    Opb

    Here's a little blog post I wrote about using Ounces Per Barrel and a ratio of OsPB to IBUs in order to describe the relative hoppiness of one beer versus another similar beer.
    It isn't perfect, but can be useful.
    http://mattinglybrewing.blogspot.com...-with-opb.html
    Fighting ignorance and apathy since 2004.

  6. #6
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    Thats pretty cool Drews. I was thinking something like that. Maybe with a little analysis one could factor in the aroma differences between say a Simcoe and Fuggle. The shear stinkiness factor, some hops seem to have a lot more aroma then others.
    Joel Halbleib
    CBO "Chief Brewing Officer" / Zymurgist
    Bluegrass Brewing Co
    636 East Main St
    Louisville, KY
    www.bluegrassbrewing.com

  7. #7
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    May 2005
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    Tacoma, WA
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    I typically create a "hop bill" by defining a lbs/bbl for each flavor/aroma hop, calculating their bitterness contributions in IBUs and then adding enough bittering hops to make up the difference between my target bitterness and what's already in there. I think it would eventually be cool to use oil content(s) instead of weight per barrel, though, because it would automatically compensate for hop variety (my assumption is that oil profiles are what differentiate varieties from each other).

    I started a database of common hop varieties and their typical oil levels. I believe my numbers are from a HopUnion Directory of Hop Data. Anyway, you can download it at http://sites.google.com/site/republicbrewpub/ - the file is called "Hop Compounds.xls". It's not very thorough... yet!

    Joe

  8. #8
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    Jun 2007
    Location
    Solon, IA
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    Oil stats

    Many stat sheets for hop lots come with a total oil content (as ml/100g, I believe). Many are fractionated beyond that point as well. It seems to be that you could plug the info into a spreadsheet and correlate the data with qualitative tasting.

    I designed a recipe designer to do this, but I haven't had the opportunity to either use the program or check it against sensory analysis. I'd like to know if there are any formulae that describe the utilization and destruction of the aroma oils during the boil, fermentation, aging, and packaging.

    Bill

  9. #9
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    I have not found one yet. Don't forget filtration. Time seems to be the biggest offender to destroying aromas, at least per my taste buds.
    Joel Halbleib
    CBO "Chief Brewing Officer" / Zymurgist
    Bluegrass Brewing Co
    636 East Main St
    Louisville, KY
    www.bluegrassbrewing.com

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