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Thread: WLP500 - having a hard time collecting slurry

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    51

    WLP500 - having a hard time collecting slurry

    First off, I can't top crop this yeast due to my fermenters. But I also can't seem to get much of the slurry at all out of the dump valve. Never get a slug, always a really, really loose slurry, mostly beer. The beer is a Wit. Yeah - I want it to be cloudy but - damn! This is ridiculous! Haven't tried crash cooling yet because I'm trying to get the beer out of the fermenter as quickly as possible.

  2. #2
    youngbuckbrewer Guest

    Belgian Ale yeast

    Some of those Belgian Ale yeasts won't flocc out quickly which is one reason why they are such great bottle conditioning yeasts and more importantly yeasts that stay in suspension long enough to dry out the beer attenuation wise! Just give it time and you will be rewarded with the flavor and the yeast slurry as well that you desire, but you can't rush it!!

    Michael Uhrich
    Carter's Brewing
    Billings, MT

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    30
    Time is obviously the best to let the yeast work its magic, but if your trying to move your beer faster I'd look for another strain - I've had a good luck with the Wyeast 3787 which we use for our Wit. Its been a great work horse strain for us.

    Cheers!

    Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    699
    Are you packaging or going to a serving tank? Also, when do you crash the beer?
    Joel Halbleib
    CBO "Chief Brewing Officer" / Zymurgist
    Bluegrass Brewing Co
    636 East Main St
    Louisville, KY
    www.bluegrassbrewing.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by BrewinLou
    Are you packaging or going to a serving tank? Also, when do you crash the beer?
    Trying to go directly to the keg after fermentation. I probably just need to be more patient, just want to turn these fermenters over as fast as possible. I'm considering just cold crashing in the fermenter for a couple days to see if that helps. I'm a little concerned since I am selecting the most flocculant yeast. Trying not to have to spend several hundred dollars on yeast every time I turn around. When I was homebrewing I remember having the exact same problem with this yeast in carboys. But at least I didn't end up wasting so much beer.

    I was hoping to brew a tripel with the slurry eventually. But I'm just not sure I can collect enough yeast! I may experiment with the Wyeast 3787 and see how that works. Thanks for the advice.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    san diego, ca.
    Posts
    182
    the main factors in getting yeast to drop out for a slurry is Temp, pressure and time. At room temp. you are going to be waiting for a while to get a viscous slurry. Dropping it to 35-40 degrees for a couple of days with a few PSI on the tank will speed things up.

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