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Thread: Can rinsing prior to filling...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
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    1,602

    Can rinsing prior to filling...

    What sanitizer works well for rinsing cans before filling? I'm using Iodophor, but this seems to leave a faint taste in our Light beer. Medicine/metallic. Might be the plastic liner preferentially soaking up iodine, might be the tiny bubbles that cling and won't drain, might be many things but it doesn't really matter if the taste is there and not in our kegs made on the same run. Any suggestions?
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--
    Worldwide Brewery Installations
    www.GitcheGumeeBreweryServices.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    71
    You may want to look into Chlorine Dioxide. I did extensive testing with rinsing bottles with Chlorine Dioxide and then we did taste tests on the products to see if there was any change in flavor or taste. There was no change.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    814
    Ozonated water.

    Ozone generator may raise some health and safety issues depending on your local authorities.

    Pax.

    Liam
    Liam McKenna
    www.yellowbellybrewery.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    176
    I worked for a major beer company. We used a chlorine bleach /water mixture. The bleach came in at about 10%.The target Cl level of the mixed solution was around 20 ppm.

    Regardless of the sanitizer used or even if its just water, the cans or bottles must have adequate drain time so you don't have excess residual left in the container. If memory serves me correctly, you want no more than 1 ml (same as 1 gram) of liquid remaining for a 12 oz. container.

    You need to get rid of the iodofor.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Palau
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    1,602
    Agreed that Iodophor is not the way to go. Another related thread on keg sanitizing being discussed now as well. I'm looking at PAA or maybe chlorine dioxide. I don't like the preparation and exacting measurements that chlorine dioxide requires. In the mean time, I've got some Star-san that I'll use. Thanks for the help!
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--
    Worldwide Brewery Installations
    www.GitcheGumeeBreweryServices.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Estacada, OR.
    Posts
    42

    peracetic acid

    We've been canning now for 8 months. We used Peracetic acid on 2 batches early on, then switched to Iodophor. The Io batches did not have near the shelf life of the PA batches. A can sterilized with PA will live for 5 months and show very little wear. The Io batches live about 3 months.

    Full strength, use an ounce per gallon. Bottom line, you want to shoot for 3.5 ph. This has worked very well for us. Welcome to the wonderful world of canning!

    Drink more beer,

    Ken Johnson
    Fearless Brewing Company

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
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    71
    Chlorine Dioxide is made and generated on site and is dispensed at the titrations that are needed. Here is some information I have on the subject. I encourage you investigate this. There are several suppliers of Chlorine Dioxide"

    "Food & Beverage Processing - Chlorine dioxide provides excellent microbiological control for the food & beverage processing sectors in areas including brewing and bottling, fruit and vegetables (FDA approved application), poultry and other meats, fish, and dairy processes. ClO2 also provides excellent microbiological control in flume waters, packaging operations and process disinfection.

    CIO2 does not react with most "organics" in flume water; this makes it a very effective disinfectant. It also neutralizes foul smelling odors including secondary and tertiary amines formed in the meat packing industry.
    Some specific applications for CIO2 are:
    Cleaning in place (CIP) and sanitizing operations CIO2 can be very effective when used as the final sanitizing rinse in CIP systems, including filler rooms. Typically applied at between 2 and 5 ppm (where its kill-rate is in the order of 60 to 90 seconds) it leaves no toxic residues to interfere with other chemical/biochemical processes. CIO2 works quickly and breaks down into inert compounds. The unique chemistry produces no toxic organo-chlorine by-products (such as THM's) and is therefore an environmentally friendly alternative. CIO2 is a proven virucide and fungicide and is effective in destroying detrimental wild yeast strains.
    Cleaning pasteurizers, bottle/can warmers and coolersCIO2 effectively controls both free floating (planktonic) and attached (sessile) microorganisms. Sessile bacteria flourish in biofilms that build up due to ideal environmental conditions (temperature, nutrients, etc.). Biofilm build-up occurs on heat exchange surfaces, in pipes, lines, orifices and pumps. The resulting inefficiencies cost money on wasted energy, down time and repairs. CIO2 is the best available technology for controlling biofilms in these systems.
    Additionally, the longer these waters can be retained in a sanitary condition, the more money is saved in water costs, water discharge, and energy to heat replacement water. CIO2 can be periodically batch loaded into the water system or metered on a timed basis. This can extend pasteurizer waters 4 to 6 times their previous discharge cycle.
    Chain and conveyor line lube injectionCIO2 can be injected into lubrication streams for effective slime control on conveyor lines. This allows for significantly longer run times between shut downs for cleaning, resulting in dramatic cost reductions. By attacking the biofilms attached to the conveyors and the underlying rails, various soils are loosened and the natural cleaning action of the lube is enhanced. Chains and conveyors run more smoothly, with less wear on chains and motors. Also, even small levels of CIO2 will help deodorize the line.
    Filler head assembliesCIO2 solutions can be sprayed on filler head assemblies in 10-second bursts during breaks and lunch. The spray coats all surfaces attacking biofilms, inhibiting bacterial growth and deodorizing the surrounding environment.
    Water filtration and distribution system disinfectionCIO2 effectively controls both planktonic and sessile microorganisms. Because planktonic cells are much easier to destroy, a disinfection procedure often produces excellent results initially, but within 7 to 10 days the counts return. CIO2 is able to penetrate, disrupt and destroy the biofilm where chlorine is completely ineffective.
    Mould and odor controlMisting of CIO2 solutions into air streams prevents the spread of mould and wild yeast. This controls "off-tastes" in the product.
    Sanitation of tanker trucks, wagons and transportation vessels
    CIO2 solutions are effective for sanitizing and removing biofilms from the insides of tanker trucks, wagons and transportation vessels. A thorough sanitizing rinse of CIO2 with close attention to overhead surfaces can improve the quality of product, and significantly extend its shelf
    life."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
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    1,602
    I've used chlorine dioxide as long ago as 1995. Used a brand called "Oxine". We used it as a spray in our bottle twist rinser, and as a crown disinfectant as the crowns went down the chute. Definitely got rid of our bugs. I also know that it must be treated with respect and mixed very appropriately. One of our employees got quite ill from fumes when he didn't follow proper mixing protocol. And there are concerns with residual O2 and shelf life when used as a rinse. I'm thinking those same concerns might also hold for PAA as well. Anybody on disinfecting rinsing and shelf life?
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--
    Worldwide Brewery Installations
    www.GitcheGumeeBreweryServices.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    3

    can rinsing prior to filling

    Ozone (O3) in water is fast easy, economical and safe.

    Food and beverage operators are finding it better that hazardious chemicals. No storage issues, generated as required.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Fawn Grove, PA, USA
    Posts
    546
    I just watched last night that Coca-Cola uses Ionized air in their twist rinsers, mind you this is in a HEPA positive pressure room, but I was surprised they didn't use a "wet" sanitizing medium.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Williamsburg, Va
    Posts
    136

    Paa

    We use 50ppm Peracetic Acid as recommended by our supplier to no ill effect. Hope that helps.

    Geoff

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    47
    Does the same go for bottles?

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