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Thread: Brewpub Kitchen Sizing And Cost

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Brewpub Kitchen Sizing And Cost

    Would appreciate any expertise on how much cost and sq. ft. for the kitchen in the Brewpub. Brewery 2000 sq. ft. with bbl system, pub side 5000 sq. ft.
    Steve
    Wolfgang's Brauhaus
    Midlothian, Va
    Last edited by Wolfgang; 11-25-2010 at 03:51 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Ex-Germany / California
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    I think you need to expand on your question. There are a lot of factors involved in this question, including seating and what you plan on doing in the kitchen. Also, you should probably ask any chef/cook about this rather than brewers.

    Prost!

  3. #3
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    Jan 2009
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    Florence, Oregon, USA
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    I would say if you plan a gormet kitchen, at least 2,400 square feet. If you're just doing pizza and salads, 80 sq feet or less. Costs could run 1 million on the high end to $2500 on the low end.

    Seriously, what are you serving or do you intend to serve? Are you going to use paper or china? How many do you expect to employ for kitchen staff? How many customers have you calculated it will take to make a profit? What kind of patron turn over do you expect? Specifics would help us determine where your costs would fall and what size kitchen you might need.

    Good Luck!
    Last edited by Scott M; 11-28-2010 at 01:30 PM.
    Scott Maurer
    Brewer, making the best beer I can
    Just Off North Jetty Road, (in my Barn)
    Florence, Oregon

  4. #4
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    Aug 2010
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    I also agree with needing more info. If you can give me a rough menu I can help with your plan. Also do you have a covers per day estimate, and also are you willing to buy used or do you have to have all new stuff?

  5. #5
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    Aug 2010
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    22

    More Details On Kitchen Sizing

    Sorry for the poor information upfront, brain not active when I posted that day.
    The menu should be pretty straight forward grilled items, with some saute recipes.
    First line of menu items will be homemade sausages, nurnberger bratwurst, wiesswurst, knockwurst, smoked hungarian, polish, etc. Accompanying sides american or german potato salad, sauerkraut, red cabbage, coleslaw.
    Burgers with Fries
    Some pan fried items like Wiener Schnitzel or braised pork.
    I would be looking at a restaurant barbecue type grill for the sausages, a fryer for fries.
    Oven, prep tables, dishwasher, sinks, storage etc.
    Going to use standard china and not paper as was hilariously indicated.

    I have 4500 sq. ft. for the bar and kitchen side of the equation, looking at aproximately 900 to 1000 sq. ft. for the kitchen, does this sound ballpark possible? That would leave me with about 100 seats including the bar seating when calculating each seat at about 34 sq. ft. per seat.

    I appreciate the candor, no one can help without enough info.

  6. #6
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    Aug 2010
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    Your numbers sound ballpark right. I will get you some more solid number of what I have dealt with in the past and present, but I am run 94 seats with fill bar and kitchen/dish room in a little under 3000 ft2 so 4500ft seems roomy to me.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    McCall, Idaho
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    337
    Ballpark square footage estimates can be tricky. Each business model dictates specific needs.
    One of your largest expense category's to determine first is your grease trap requirements and your fire suppression hood. Potentially lots of $$$. Each city/county will have different fees associated.

    As an example we avoided $10,000 for a grease trap the city would require us to install if we added french fries (put simply). Our solution, bagged high quality kettle chips.
    Doing this (and cooking on a bbq) we were able to install the $600 variety grease trap. I have been impressed with the lack of irritated requests for french fries. We do have a little fry daddy for happy hour fried pickles and a crab ball or other random food specials.

    The State requires a full fire suppression hood for the items we offer for food. Estimated costs $30,000. Our solution, we cook all of our BBQ and Mongolian bowls in a covered out door kitchen. (There is 2 feet of snow here already and will remain that way until April. )
    We can squeeze 250 people at our pub in the summer inside and outside in our beer garden. In the winter we can squeeze 35 people seated. 75 super packed.
    Our inside pub space is 500 square feet. (with two covered decks and a barrel fire pit. Our part indoor mostly outdoor kitchen is 300 square feet. For what we have we move an amazing amount of food efficiently! In this space we have sold 750 bbls of our beer and thousands of brats and burgers in about a year and a half.

    weeeeeeeeeeeeeee!!!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Ex-Germany / California
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    Good advice here. I knew about the grease traps and many publicans with kitchens have complained about building improvements in real estate that was something other than a restaurant beforehand. Many have said to stay away from such efforts, as costs spiral quickly.

    My $.02 is simply KEEP IT SIMPLE with the menu, especially if you are doing a German kitchen. I applaud the concept of the Wurstkueche in Los Angeles (not a brewpub, but they sell A LOT of beer) which has proven that it works, even in remote and, maybe at first glance, undesirable locations. You do not need to do everything to please everybody.

    Best of luck - alles Gute fuer den Neuanfang!

    Servus!

  9. #9
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    Aug 2010
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    37
    Another series of questions. Are you the general contractor for the project? Can you and/or will you buy used? How many food deliveries per week can you get? What are your yearly sales projections? Are you willing to do some work on your own or can you with local regulations? Can you work out trade-out deals?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Florence, Oregon, USA
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    350
    I agree with keep it simple, utilize all the work arounds to avoid additional costs, along with simple think about functional.

    Other than that, it is now up to you and what you want that will determine cost. You can search for used equipment or purchase new, you can opt to do some of the work yourself, the list goes on.

    Good luck with the project!!
    Scott Maurer
    Brewer, making the best beer I can
    Just Off North Jetty Road, (in my Barn)
    Florence, Oregon

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    37
    Kitchen ideas for you, sorry if they are not the best organized. Sorry in advance for the long post but this is a huge topic on which I could ramble on for hours at a time about, so here it goes.

    Equipment:
    For new pricing get a Rapids Wholesale or Central Restaurant Products catalog to familiarize your self with some of the new prices. Remember that if you do buy all new and from one source that you can work out some package deals and work the price down, but that is still not as good as if you can find good used stuff. Try to find a used equipment dealer around your area or even better a commercial equipment auction house. Through an auction house you can buy some used equipment that looks and work like new for half price or better.

    If you will be making your own sausages you will probably want some kind of smoker set up. With that you have a ton of options. Also you might want to take in to consideration the meat and sausage prep area. You will need extra room for cutting, mixing, grinding, and stuffing.


    Kitchen, Storage, and Dish area:
    Something to think about in kitchen design is the chef/s that will be cooking in your kitchen. If he/she is skilled and organized that person can work a ton of food out of a very small kitchen, if they are not you might need 2 people instead of 1, or 3-4-5 instead of 2, you get the point. The complexity of the menu and the amount of people you plan on serving each meal will also determine the number of cooks that will need to be staffed at one time and also how much space each of them need to do their job.

    I currently work out of a 10x13 kitchen, with a 14x17 dish room/prep room and have another cooler/freezer/storage area of 18x24, so we have about 800 ft2 of total work area. We are limited to 8 and 9 foot ceilings so vertical storage is nonexistent, but if you have higher ceilings you can put a ton more stuff in a much smaller footprint as long as you are willing to climb up high to get your seldom used items. Another spot that is often forgotten for storage is under booths. If you have the right style you can fit Rubbermaid totes under the seats for seasonal stuff like holiday decorations that you would never need to get to during business hours.

    Cost of guessed equipment needs:
    Here are some quick numbers I threw together.
    1 fryer 18w x 30d new$500-1000, used 200-1000

    char broiler 24-36w x 30d new $1500-$3000, used starting at 200-1000

    6-8 burner cook top with stoves under & small flattop 3-6 ft w x 30d most likely to be new. Hard to find used but can be found if you look hard enough.

    Large coolers & freezers for bulk storage new $7-10k each or more depending on size, used $1500-8k

    Exhaust hood 8-12 feet used about $100-200 per foot

    Small coolers and freezers new $2400-3400 each, used $500-2000 each

    Sandwich line or prep line new ~$2500, used ~$1000

    Stainless steel prep tables can be bought for about $100-200 each used

    Dishwashers can be leased for under $100 a month or bought new for $3-11k depending on the style

    Ansul system (fire suppression) Here is where you can save big. A new system can cost well over $3k, but you can easily pick up the same system for $500 or less. It will cost you about $1500 to have the new or used system installed either way by a professional, but it is worth it.

    You also can't forget the little things like scoops, spatulas, plates, glasses and all the like. You can get some numbers for those from the catalogs that I mentioned earlier, but in my experience it is easier and cheaper to get those things from your food supplier. They are usually more than happy to cut you a really good deal on small wares when they know they are going to be getting thousands of dollars in food sales from you every week.

    I almost forget, installation of equipment. See if you can do some of it depending on local codes, or see if the installer will let you be one of his helpers. Being the go-fer guy and spare set of hands during my restaurant build saved me thousands of dollars in labor.

    So if I forget anything or you have any other questions just feel free to ask and I will answer them as best as I can.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    22

    Sehr gut danke fuer alles

    I greatly appreciate the responses very helpful in my planning, the grease trap would have been a real trap literally, did not think of that.

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