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Thread: Maple Syrup in beer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Athens, NY
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    429

    Maple Syrup in beer

    I'm planning on brewing a maple brown ale and am looking for suggestions on how to handle the maple syrup. Specifically I'm wondering about type of syrup to use, amount to add and when to add it. I don't want the maple flavor to be overpowering, but definitely noticeable and complimentary to the malt flavors.

    any help would be great!
    Hutch Kugeman
    Head Beer Guy
    Crossroads Brewing
    Athens, NY

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
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    99
    Charlie Papazian talks about this in his book and recommends 1 gallon (3.8L) per 5 gallons (19L) beer. I guess you can scale up from there to start. Sounds expensive...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Palau
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    I make a mape wine and a maple mead for my own use. Delicious! From my own maple trees and reduced on an outdoor maple wood fired evaporator. Gives a faint smokey touch as well. But to BUY real maple syrup for a noticeable taste would indeed be expensive. Especially for something like a brown (as opposed to a wheat, for example). Have you considered flavorings? Virginia Dare has always been able to help me with flavorings and with dosages when asked. For what it is worth, I've found maple syrup nearly 100% fermentable. And the taste of maple wine is NOT like maple syrup, but instead a light nut (maybe hazelnut) taste. Good luck--wish I could stop by to give the final product a try!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    21

    maple syrup

    I've done a few beers with maple syrup. Best one I ever did was a maple porter. The maple mixed wonderfully with the robust malt character. I used 5 gallons in a 14 bbl batch. Best time to add it is at whirlpool because you get the both flavor and aroma. I bought the maple syrup through a food co-op which was much cheaper than any other source. If you have something like that in your area, I recommend that or going directly to a local syrup maker.

    Doug

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Vancouver
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    I agree with the last post. Using a maple flavouring is the best way to go. If however you are determined to use real maple syrup keep in mind that it has a relatively high content of calcium and other metals (especially the dark grades) and does not store well because of the low brix ( once a drum is opened you have to refrigerate it or you will get some significant mold growth within a couple of days).
    jonofdc

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
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    Sugar Daddy

    If you are a pub brewer I suggest adding it directly to the server. Sani your server and add the hot boiled syrup to the tank, and give it time to cool. This will ensure its sanitary. Then top off with the filtered beer. The low temp and low yeast count will keep it from fermenting. (Assuming its ale yeast) You can have the same problem with honey, but adding it to the server adds sweetness and honey character without fermenting.
    If you bottle try experimenting w/ syrup for priming sugar?
    Operations Director, Tin Roof BC
    ted@tinroofbeer.com
    "Your results may vary"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Athens, NY
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    Ted,
    Thanks for the advice, I was leaning towards adding the syrup to the serving tank. It's just nice to hear it works from someone who's done it before. What concentration have you used in the past?
    Hutch Kugeman
    Head Beer Guy
    Crossroads Brewing
    Athens, NY

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Michigan
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    2
    I used 5 lbs in a one barrel batch. This lent a moderate flavor and some aroma. I added it in the last minute of boil to sanitize.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Athens, NY
    Posts
    429
    Thanks for all the advice everyone. Just to let you know, I added 2.25 gallons of Extra Dark Syrup from a local producer into my serving tank (boiled the syrup and allowed it to cool in the sanitized tank). Then I filtered my 7bbl batch of Brown Ale directly into the tank. The result was a light maple aroma mixing with the malt and a noticeable but light sweentness in the flavor and a hint of maple in the finish. All in all, a successfull endeavor. Thanks again for the help.
    Hutch Kugeman
    Head Beer Guy
    Crossroads Brewing
    Athens, NY

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