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Thread: Wlp500

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    25

    Wlp500

    Hi Everyone,

    I'm hoping some of the brewers with experience using this strain can chime in. I know its a poorly flocculating yeast, so I imagine others have experimented with methods of getting WLP500 to drop faster. Has anyone had any luck using gelatin/biofine/isinglass or anything of the sort?

    I know that ultimately it's a function of time and temperature, but just looking to speed up the process without having to filter.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24

    Used biofine

    I just brewed a tripel a month ago using the WLP500 in which I used biofine and the beer came out with a slight chill haze. We let the beer sit at 34 F for two weeks after it hit terminal, transferred it over using 1000ml of biofine clear for 11.5 BBL batch and carbonated, and then let it sit for another week at 35F. Before racking, we shot out a few gallons to clear up the bottom. The first 2 kegs were a bit more yeasty than I would like, but once we got through them the rest were perfect. Doing the same with our dubbel, with similar results. Don't know if that time frame works for you, but hopefully it helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    25

    Thanks so much

    Yea- I was trying to turn my vessels over faster than that, but it might just be the case where I need to commit an extra week to cold conditioning when using WLP500. I wonder how it would turn out with just a week at 34 then a week on Biofine. I guess I could always filter afterwards if I wasn't content with the results.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24

    Try using a bit more biofine

    Well, you could try using a bit more biofine clear. I've had to use up to 1500ml for 14.5 BBLs for our blonde ale to make sure that we could kick it out fairly fast. I've also had to keg some beer from our sample valve just to get beer on tap (since our sample valve is at our 2 BBL mark on our 15 BBL BT and around 5 BBL on our 30 BBL BT, we could pull clearer beer at the valve than if we pulled from the bottom). Then you can let the rest of the tank cold until it cleared up to where you like. Again, just a thought.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    154
    Patience is the only thing I've found that works. Dropping the yeast out of it everyday (sometimes twice a day), with the tank set at 31, for a good ten days or so. Then a coarse filtration. I've tried fining it but it still didn't work all that great for me and took the same time but with added effort, materials, and chance for infection. I found that as long as I could get the yeast to settle out enough to not cause problems for the filter, and then used the coarsest DE available with the filter running slightly faster than normal, that you could achieve a unfiltered look and not strip out much flavor but with more consistency than an unfiltered beer. That being said I personally would rather not touch a Belgian (or most beers) with the filter if possible, but that yeast is troublesome.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24
    I agree with chaser and forgot to note that we did pull from the tanks several times during cold conditioning. We use to DE filter our beers and have switched to fining. When I did filter our beer, for that unfiltered look, we would filter a portion of the batch depending on how we wanted the beer to look. We would pump a 1-3 bbls in from the fermenter and then filter the rest on top.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    25

    Interesting

    Diggity- That's a very interesting concept- filtering part of the batch and leaving part unfiltered. I'm going to try a good dose of Biofine next brew and if that should fail, I'd like to try mixing like you say.

    After about a week at 34 the beer had an orange juice like opacity to it. Is that similar to the look your unfiltered beer has that you mix in with your fitlered stuff? I'd just like to understand the ratio of non-filtered to filtered in order to get a good non-filtered look. Also having a little yeast in the bottle wouldn't be terrible.

    I'm on a 20BBL system if that helps.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    24
    That is fairly cloudy compared to our tripel when it was sitting at a week at 34 F. Maybe you should drop your tank down further as chaser does to 31 F. As for the blending, I wish I can tell you an exact science to the method, but with my experience it was all done by eye balling the clarity of the pre-filtered beer. Iím guessing that if it is as cloudy as you say, I would probably look to do around .5-1 BBL to your 20 BBL batch to create a slight haze. Then again, that is only my suggestion as it has worked for me a few times. I guess if you do end up trying it and it ends up still too cloudy, you could always add a fining agent and mix with CO2.

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