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Thread: Ventilation requirements for fermentation room

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    14

    Ventilation requirements for fermentation room

    Hello all,
    I am currently working on ventilation requirements for my new brewery. One area I'm unsure of is ventilation for my fermentation room. The basic setup is something like this: 4 - 8 bbl plastic conicals and 2 - 3.5 bbl plastic conicals in a temperature controlled room, approximately 12'x20'. I'll ferment around 68 degrees and rack to a jacketed brite tank (outside the room) for clearing and carbonating.
    There weren't and red flags for any HVAC guys I've talked to about doing this with a basic A/C setup. Unfortunately, I hadn't considered the requirements for venting CO2 safely while maintaining temps. Should this be a simple vent at the floor? How much volume would I need to push? Can I vent the CO2 from the fv's directly out of the room? Am I even asking the right questions!? What have you guys seen/done that would be applicable to my situation?

    Thanks,
    Matt
    -Matt Geary

    Things about me you didn't know? Well, English is my second language. Growing up in my house, we spoke Sarcasm. Fluently.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Odessa, FL USA
    Posts
    159
    Haven't been to a brewery or brew-pub that specifically vents their co2 from their tank farm. My place is pretty small (1200 sf) with three 18bbl fv's and two 7 bbl rolling most of the time. I just make sure the overhead door is open shortly after entering. If your local building dept. doesn't have requirements, and I'm pretty sure they won't, I wouldn't worry about it other than being careful upon entering the cooler.That's a can of worms better left un-opened. The co2 is more dense than normal air, so it will fall out and be displaced with outside air every time you open the walk-in door.
    Bob
    Saint Somewhere Brewing
    Tarpon Springs FL

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    14
    So, barring any requirements from the city, I should just have one or two CO2 alarms in there, and proceed with caution? Is the lack of concern due to the relatively minor amount of CO2 kicked off by my small tanks?
    -Matt Geary

    Things about me you didn't know? Well, English is my second language. Growing up in my house, we spoke Sarcasm. Fluently.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    15
    We are planning on doing the same thing and are planning on never letting our CO2 enter the room. Our blowoff will go into a bucket with a lid that is filled with sanitizer. This tube will be sealed until below the liquid level. Another port on the lid will have a hose that vents to the outside. This way, we have a suitable airlock for keeping nasty stuff from getting in, but the co2 is sequestered in the bucket and exits through the hose.

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