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Thread: WANTED: Beer Chemist to help solve the mystery of a non-alcoholic malt beverage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    1

    WANTED: Beer Chemist to help solve the mystery of a non-alcoholic malt beverage

    I'm looking for a brewer or beer chemist to help us reverse engineer a non-alcoholic malt beverage. The particular beverage is produced and primarily sold overseas, and we are hoping to find a similar or improved recipe for production in the US. Problem is we are not professionals . . . .well at least professional brewers. We are pretty good at drinking the malt beverage though

    We know the ingredients (but not he proportions). We know that the beverage requires malted hops and is eventually carbonated, but they find a way to make the thing non-alcoholic.

    Anyway, if you'd like the challenge send me an email to flippydoodle@yahoo.com

    We're happy to provide samples of the product we are trying to reverse engineer and will pay a small fee ($500) to a pro that can crack the mystery . . . which in all likelihood you'll be able to do in a few days.

    Thanks for the consideration.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ex-Germany / California
    Posts
    601
    Is this in reference to Bionade?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    14
    I hear those malted hops are really hard to find.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    3
    google can give you the answer for free.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    4
    Malted hops?!?! WTF is that?!?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    27
    Quote Originally Posted by brauer
    Malted hops?!?! WTF is that?!?
    Where did you think "crystal" hops came from.
    Brewers enjoy working to make beer as much as drinking beer instead of working. -Harold Rudolph

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Florence, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    350
    Makes a person scratch their head.

    Just a thought, but wouldn't you produce an unhopped wort, ferment it, then boil off the alcohol and rehop during the boil off process?

    Somehow, beer without alcohol is hop soda!
    Scott Maurer
    Brewer, making the best beer I can
    Just Off North Jetty Road, (in my Barn)
    Florence, Oregon

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    4
    This is Malta. Very popular in the Caribbean.

    I don't think it's practical on a very small scale to bottle it, but kegging it, even in corny kegs would be doable.

    Make a standard wort as if home-brewing, using your desired hops and malts. The Malta I've had seems to taste most like a brown ale or porter wort.

    Stir in some caramel during the boil, then cool... get it into a fermenter and pitch yeast--just like homebrewing. At some point, when the taste seems right to you (usually when the alcohol is <=2%), rack out into a kettle and boil out the alcohol. This also serves to kill the yeast.

    Then cool it into a cleaned, sanitized keg, and force carbonate.

    The reason bottling is not feasible is that, in small scale operations, force carbonating bottles is impractical. If you were to skip the final, yeast killing boil, then bottles would invariably explode. Hell, even a keg at that point would probably not be able to withstand the pressure, and even if it did, pouring a glass would be like dealing with a shaken bottle of champagne, except with much greater head retention.

    Anyways... you really don't need a beer-chemist for this. Malta is essentially a near-beer. If you're trying to figure out the specific ingredients used in a certain product, then maybe you're best off asking a qualified beer taster who may be able to diagnose the specific hops and maybe even the malts but at that point, getting proportions right is going to be a complete act of trial and error.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Hardy, VA
    Posts
    163
    Quote Originally Posted by gardenofsound

    Anyways... you really don't need a beer-chemist for this. Malta is essentially a near-beer. If you're trying to figure out the specific ingredients used in a certain product, then maybe you're best off asking a qualified beer taster who may be able to diagnose the specific hops and maybe even the malts but at that point, getting proportions right is going to be a complete act of trial and error.
    You forgot to tell them where to send the check.

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