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Thread: Mill right on the floor next to the MT

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Astoria, NY
    Posts
    156

    Mill right on the floor next to the MT

    My understanding that an enclosed mill room to keep dust away from everything else is important - yet I've been to a few well-respected breweries where the mill is out on the floor right next to the MT.

    Is this OK? To be avoided? What say y'all?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    11
    My understanding, from talking with the QC director at Karl Strauss is that the number 1 cause of lacto in the brewhouse is mill dust. He absolutely recommends isolating it, although many don't.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Polson, Montana, USA
    Posts
    1,092
    I agree.
    Put in a different room. Too big of a bacterial risk! It doesn't matter if other breweries don't do it. They may have other reasons why. Don't do it!

    Prost!
    Dave
    Glacier Brewing Company
    406-883-2595
    glacierbrewing@bresnan.net

    "who said what now?"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    182
    I'd say the biggest reason why a brewery might not do it is due to money and space restrictions.

    If I could afford to do it, I would. If I couldn't afford the enclosed room, then I'd at least try to keep mill dust under control. If I couldn't keep it under control, I'd at least try to keep it away from the brewhouse and the cellar...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    189
    Isn't keeping it away from the cellar the main consideration? I don't think the dust getting on the brewhouse (other than maybe the heat exchanger) would be that much of an issue?

    Quote Originally Posted by kai
    I'd say the biggest reason why a brewery might not do it is due to money and space restrictions.

    If I could afford to do it, I would. If I couldn't afford the enclosed room, then I'd at least try to keep mill dust under control. If I couldn't keep it under control, I'd at least try to keep it away from the brewhouse and the cellar...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    182
    Well, yeah. I nearly edited to say that

    dust in the mash tun - no biggie
    dust in the kettle - also probably no biggie
    in the whirlpool or the hopback - I'd avoid
    in the fermenter - probably not a good idea
    in the filler - sour ale, yes please?

    I guess what I was trying to say that if you want to play the odds, then containing the dust is probably a good idea. We don't have a contained room for our mill, but we do for our fermenters.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Redmond (Seattle), Wa
    Posts
    362
    We have a mill in the brewhouse area and have never had an issue. We send a sample from every batch produced to a third party lab and have never had any funky results (knock on wood). Of course, objects shift during flight and one size never fits all.

    Beaux Bowman
    Black Raven Brewing

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Astoria, NY
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    156
    Thanks gents. I too think it's best to play it safe and keep the mill contained.

    Is there a link or can anyone outline what the specs should be for a proper mill room (apparently it should adhere to some sort of explosion code?) I did a search and didn't find any info...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Polson, Montana, USA
    Posts
    1,092
    Quote Originally Posted by fastricky
    Thanks gents. I too think it's best to play it safe and keep the mill contained.

    Is there a link or can anyone outline what the specs should be for a proper mill room (apparently it should adhere to some sort of explosion code?) I did a search and didn't find any info...
    I built a small (7'x12) room with 2x10 walls and ceiling. It has an "explosion proof" light fixture with the switch on the exterior of the room. The switch turns on the light and turns on the make-up air fan. We have an industrial fan that pulls air out of the room and fresh air is sucked in passively through another vent thereby venting the grain dust out. These were all requirements from the State of Montana for controlling grain dust. At least they were when we got started.

    Prost!
    Dave
    Glacier Brewing Company
    406-883-2595
    glacierbrewing@bresnan.net

    "who said what now?"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Astoria, NY
    Posts
    156
    Thanks Dave! - Rich

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    5

    Different Strokes

    We use bagged grain and we built an enclosed mill room for our little brewpub (5 barrel system), then ran our grain auger through one of the walls and up to the mash tun. We had powered ventilation, etc. For our environment, it was a total wast of space and money.... unless the person feeding the mill just likes to create dust by overzealous handling, you simply don't need all that jazz. All you need to do is place the open end of the bag into the mill hopper and slip the bag off the grain, letting it flow right into the hopper. This eliminates 98% of the dust and adds no time to the process.

    Handling bulk grain would be very different, and I would think having a mill room would be more appropriate.

    I just wanted to save folks from having to spend time and money solving a problem that may not need to be solved if they are using bagged grain. It's a matter of solving the problem by establishing a process and training employees, or spending money so you can hire monkeys ;-)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Moorpark Ca, USA
    Posts
    146
    We have our grain mounted to a workbench with casters. We roll in outside and close the garage door.

    http://enegrenbrewing.com/blog/brewe...unching-unit-2

    After milling, I take an air compressor to it and blow everything down and wipe it off before it comes back in. That kind of dust in a damp brewery would be a nightmare.
    Chris Enegren
    www.enegrenbrewing.com

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    6
    Chris,

    How quickly can this Roppi 250 mill a 50 lb bag?

    Brian

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    474
    Roppi 250 is about 4 minutes a bag. Depending on how close your rollers are, natch.

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