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Thread: bitter condensation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    6

    bitter condensation

    Is it a big deal to keep the condensation from falling back into the boiling wort?

    Pedro

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada!
    Posts
    281
    yes,
    the condensate carries all the volatiles you're trying to boil off. All you need to do is smell (or worse, taste) the condensate from the first few minutes of a boil to understand why you need to get rid of it. It stinks like cigarettes, and more!

    I had a homebrewer once ask me why his beer was so damn bitter, and astringent - turns out he was boiling with a lid on, and all the condensate dropped back into the boil.

    Homebrewers usually realize an evaporation rate of 10-15% where as breweries usually run in the 5% + range depending on the stack design. What are you achieving with your design?


    Dave

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Santa Rosa CA USA
    Posts
    962
    Simply taste the condensate at different times during boil and see if you want those flavors in your beer. It is also very enlightening to taste what hop notes are volatizing at which times.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Black Mountain
    Posts
    74
    What about all those pictures I see of breweries and otherwise that have the stacks seemingly shooting straight up out of the tank into space.

    check out this link

    http://www.sierra-nevada.com/tour/brewhouse.html

    it looks like the stack goes straight up.



    Dave

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    37
    Kettle stacks like that will generally have a drip ring on the bottom of the stack that will catch the condensate and send it down the drain.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    25
    Kettles usually have a drip ring at the base of the stack to catch condensate and pipe it to the drain. A drip ring is just a lip that extends out a short distance from inside the stack that has a drain that runs outside the kettle. Sometimes the drain lines are piped outside the kettle and sometimes they are hidden inside the cladding.

    MoreBeer

    Sorry about the repost, was typing at the same time.
    Last edited by MoreBeer; 11-09-2004 at 03:35 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    6
    Thanks a lot for your support!
    I didn´t think about that when designing my system. I use a mash/kettle vessel that has a flat lid which holds the agitator. I now have to figure out a way to get that condensation out. Maybe designing a second lid in form of a cone with a drip ring where the large end of the cone meets the kettle side wall.
    Any suggestions?
    As a response for Dave: I did not calculate my evaporation rate yet. Too many things to do!!

    Thanks in advance. Brew for passion!!!

    Pedro

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