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Thread: SMS Vs DIN practical use by Brewers?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Victoria, B.C.
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    SMS Vs DIN practical use by Brewers?

    Hi there,

    I'm researching adapting our fittings from TC to a faster fittings which i've used in previous Breweries. I was wondering if anyone had any opinion on SMS compared to DIN. I've used DIN before and found extremely easier and faster to connect which makes everything quicker and much more sanitary. Being they look almost the the same other than on paper (SMS 87 PSI Vs DIN 580 PSI) I was wondering if anyone had any feedback from brewery use and if anyone can justify the extra cost of DIN or will SMS do same the job (and for for less cost) but a heck of a lot faster than TC..?

    Cheers,

    Dave Woodward

    Tofino Brewing Co.
    Last edited by juliobrewer; 02-23-2012 at 11:01 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    137
    I too am very curious here, I've been told that the reason TC is so commonplace is because it is far and above easier to keep sanitary, no threads or nooks and crannies to hide bugs. I know it was hard for me to connect TC connections but I only did it for a week. My buddy that worked there did them so fast it wasn't funny, due to using them daily for so long. If you think they're that hard to deal with, I've seen more expensive spring loaded TC connectors so that putting on the clamp part is easy and then you just tighten with both hands. I have, though, read a decent amount of people here talking about using DIN (I'm unfamiliar with SMS) but those are threaded right? Therefore have a higher chance for critters to build a colony in the dark dreaded places?

    I'm very curious to understand more here for sure!
    ~Phil

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Victoria, B.C.
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    TC's got indentations on them also. I personally never found any problem with the threads on DIN hiding any grime or other things or had any problems with sanitation. Just give each end a quick spray with sani and your good to go! If anything i've got a problem with TC and the dropping of fitting and gaskets when in a hurry making connections.

    But I haven't grown that third hand and a tail yet so maybe that's whats missing...

    Dave.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
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    69
    Having used both DIN and TC, I would have to go with DIN. While it is threaded, because it is one package, I can sanitize with EtOH and flame. I also find that using TC all the time can do a number on my hands (carpal tunnel). Just my two hundredths of a dollar.
    Roger Greene

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Victoria, B.C.
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    I do agree that DIN is more practical but I original question was if there was any real difference in usage with DIN vs SMS as they both have the gasket in the male end and are both threaded on and tightened with a wrench.

    So far all I can find out is that DIN just seems to be more money than SMS but basically functions the same.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
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    Other threads cover the topic of DIN vs. triclamp. I've used both and prefer triclamp. DIN and SMS are nearly the same. Threads on either are NOT the same thing you normally worry about in a brewery. They are external to the joint, rounded, broad clearances, and easy to keep sanitary. They are made to be clean and sanitary. The only real difference between DIN and SMS is that DIN has a tapered plug and SMS is a flat face. DIN is metric tubing, SMS is in inches. One of my big complaints with either is that the gasket stays in the fitting and is not removed for sanitation like triclamps are. Other big complaint is male/female issues with hoses and any other connections I need to make. Try to join two hoses. Need special adapters. And carpal tunnel? I have much higher incidence of wrist fatigue with screwed joints than with triclamp. And hoses & fittings are heavier with DIN/SMS. And I don't like to be required to use tools to do my job. Big, heavy DIN wrench never where you want it. I shouldn't have to use special tools to do my job as a brewer. So anyway for the difference in price, I'd go with SMS.
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--
    Worldwide Brewery Installations
    www.GitcheGumeeBreweryServices.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    807
    Got to agree with Philip on the tendency of brewers to neglect the gasket on these fittings. Nasty bug haven.

    One huge advantage of TC is the absence of male and female, ie. all hose ends are the same, vales don't have to be double male, double female, male/female, etc.

    Pax.

    Liam
    Liam McKenna
    www.yellowbellybrewery.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Torrance, CA, US
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    173

    I second that!

    I too have used DIN and TC and the fact that there is no male vs female is the HUGEST benefit of using TC.

    The longer you work with TC, the faster and more accurate you get- even in awkward positions. For me, it's all about muscle memory.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
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    Victoria, B.C.
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    I will say although I do I respect your opinion as fellow brewers though I do respectfully disagree on some points.

    As for both ends of TC being the same that is nice but trying to connect two hoses together with a external clamp can be a nightmare when your in a hurry with trying to line them up perfectly. As for DIN wrenches being big and heavy and hoses heavier I never found that at all. In fact the ones in my previous job were quite light and easy to handle. The adapters for joining hoses were quite easy to handle and I found I could get things set up much faster and be able to change things up on the fly which was a great advantage to having fitting with the gasket already.

    Unfortunately as this company gets bigger with more vessels, equipment and whatnot I can see already bulging drawer of TC clamps & gaskets turning into garbage pails full of hundreds of heavy SS clamps & gaskets which could prove extremely cumbersome.

    I guess it come down to personal preference of the Brewer and what type of plant you were trained up on but I feel there are better alternatives to TC in a Brewery.

    Just my opinion anyhow..

    Dave Woodward
    Head Brewer
    Tofino Brewing Co.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Palau
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    Dave, points taken. I guess the buckets of triclamps & gaskets was my point. They are sanitized in the buckets versus the alternative of being installed and not necessarily sanitized. Everyone has a system, and there's more than one way to do most anything. I can assemble triclamps quickly. It does take practice. I find that my wrists take a beating on a long day twisting DIN screws. Not so much with triclamps. There are fittings called RJT & IDF that have a screwed union with a removable gasket that offer yet other options. I've not used them except as odd pieces that I don't disassemble frequently. If there were a clear and obvious winner in this debate, then I guess we'd all be using it and we wouldn't have this discussion. I'm happy we have choices.
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--
    Worldwide Brewery Installations
    www.GitcheGumeeBreweryServices.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada!
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    281
    I must be the luckiest brewer in the world.

    I've got all three styles of fittings in my brewery!

    I prefer the DIN though since the fittings are easy to loosen off to prime the lines for pumping (unlike the tc fitting), the wrench is one size fits all (unlike the bevel seat fittings), and I don't have to putz around under a tank with a seal/clamp/flat faced connection (like with the t/c's).

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