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Thread: Brewery Layout

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    18

    Brewery Layout

    Looking for some advise. I have the ability to build a new building to house a brewery. The building footprint is 36' x 70'. How large of a brewhouse can this building accommodate as a production facility, no tasting room at this time. Can anyone help with a sketch of a layout showing, trench drains, overhead door, cold room, brewhouse etc. The building sits lengthwise east to west and a bathroom must go in the northeast corner. Thank you in advance. Chris

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    189
    The answer depends on a bunch of other factors. Will you have a bottling line in the same facility? Will you store raw materials, bottles, kegs, etc in the same facility? Do you need your offices to be in the same location? If it is just a brewhouse you want in that area then you can accomodate a very large brewhouse but if you need all those other things as well then the equation changes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Chestertown, Maryland
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    376
    Quote Originally Posted by newbrewery
    Looking for some advise. I have the ability to build a new building to house a brewery. The building footprint is 36' x 70'. How large of a brewhouse can this building accommodate as a production facility, no tasting room at this time. Can anyone help with a sketch of a layout showing, trench drains, overhead door, cold room, brewhouse etc. The building sits lengthwise east to west and a bathroom must go in the northeast corner. Thank you in advance. Chris
    Plan to pay somebody to do this for you.

    It's an insult to me and every registered Architect out there (yes, I'm an Architect) to expect to do this for free.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Roseville, ca Placer
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    15

    sketch hmmm

    I am thinking that he was asking for a general sketch so he as an idea what to hand over to a architect since one will be needed anyways for all official construction and working drawings for the contractors, city and permitting, I get your point which as a past paid drafter i understand. but obviously he was asking for advise, so there is no insult. I have drawn many building options and concepts with no straight edges on 8 by 11 and said if you want more you got to pay for straight edges, measurements and the time and money and experience. So if you dont have any positive or constructive input and advice like a napkin drawing for someone starting out, so they get it right and dont become another footnote in brewing, post somewhere else. be a salesman architect and process engineer explain why you should be hired to show how to do it right and save him money and time on costly errors.

    as far as advice... really you need to figure out what your budget is and therefore the size of the brewery ie 7bbl, 10bbl, 15bbl, bigger that will define the fermenters, process equipment, cip equipment, dry and cold storage, milling situation space allocations, 36 x77 sounds like a 10, 15bbl with 6 fermenters. sudwerk's davis operation is pretty tight on space but puts out a lot. size of the brewery and where its components are going to made as well as numbers of beers fermenting and conditioning at any given time, bottling vs kegging, will determine the layout as well as the actual processing layout. where does the utilities come in, what kind of utilities? size of ng lines ?, three phase etc etc...... there is a lot of information you need to figure out... if you don't want too, hire someone to figure it out and they will have code architects for that state or area on contract or on staff.... newlands is pretty good from what i have seen and heard when asked about customer service.. i have been to some of their installations to look at their designs and process concepts for work on my own concept designs.

    critical part is do your homework visits some small breweries in the size you decide and take some of the processing side of the classes at siebel. all of these will give you a idea. until you visit a lot as i have and figure out their trials and tribulations and that what works for one brewery might not work for yours.

    peace and good luck

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Chestertown, Maryland
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    376
    iscorice, you're right, my original reply was a little too harsh (bad day.)

    But, I do think your thoughtful reply demonstrates there's way too many variables in this equation for a "right" answer to be gleaned via an Internet forum... they're best off contacting a brewery planning professional to help make sense of all this. It will save them a lot of time and energy.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Florence, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    350
    Besides, where is the fun in someone else planning and designing your unique workspace? How many brewers get a chance to lay out and design their own brewery?

    Consult with an architect and work closely with them to insure your needs are being addressed. Remember to consider the flow of product through your brewery from materials delivery to brewing, fermenting, filtering or cold conditioning through bottling, kegging and shipping.

    You get one chance to get it right, the rest of the time you're trying to make what you have, work.
    Last edited by Scott M; 07-09-2012 at 06:31 PM.
    Scott Maurer
    Brewer, making the best beer I can
    Just Off North Jetty Road, (in my Barn)
    Florence, Oregon

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    474
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott M
    You get one chance to get it right, the rest of the time you're trying to make what you have, work.
    This is so true.

    One of the things that escape many first time PRO brewers is the idea of designing your workflow. It's really easy to design a good looking brewery, but two years down the line when your filter operation is always getting in the way of kegging, and you've just wrecked your third packaging brewhose because the dang forklift pinches it out of sight, and you wish the grain dust didn't settle just THERE, because....you get the picture.

    And another thing is the opportunity to put all your infrastructure in the FLOOR when you're building a new building just for brewing! If you plan it right, it could save you a TON of money and make your brewery so much safer.

    At any rate, my advice is to talk to an experienced commercial brewer, ask him or her what they HATE about their current setup, and take notes. A process engineer is even better!

    Good luck!

    Nat

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Salisbury, MD
    Posts
    19
    Our brewery that we just moved out of was that size. (40x80) We did about 4000 barrels (10bbl bh with 6-40 bbl fvs, 4-10 bbl fvs)and had completely maxed out the space. All I can say is build it as tall as you can if your goal is to expand capacity. You will run out of space for packaging(mother cases/bottles)around 2000-2500 barrels. At the end we had 4 containers in the parking lot holding all of the stuff we couldn't fit in the building. We did have really good flow around the brewery and awesome sloped tile floors which made it nice. You may be able to find some pics of our layout if you google our brewery. Good luck!
    Tommy-evolution craft brewing

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    154

    Layout

    Hire an experienced brewery consultant that can demonstrate the ability to do layouts. Call their ref and see how the brewery is still functioning 1 - 3 years later. This is the most cost effective way to go (if you disagree now just wait a few years). Engineers and others are great at what they do what they don't do is produce beer in a production setting. You need an eng/arch/brewer for layout. I mean someone that really has brewed.

    Graydon
    live2brew@yahoo.com

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