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Thread: Location of solenoid valves

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    4

    Location of solenoid valves

    I've studied the diagram for a basic brewery chilling system on Pro Refrigeration's site (very useful site, by the way) and I have a question about the solenoid valves.

    It seems to me that they would be better on the return leg from the fermenters and brites, thus making sure that the jackets were somewhat pressurized and consequently always full. Maybe we don't want constant pressure on our jackets? But with the throttle on the input side, isn't there the possibility that the glycol could conceivably be drawn out of the jackets leaving them not full? I know that would take some suction, but maybe from a small leak somewhere? Maybe this is picking at nits, but inquiring minds want to know.

    Thanks in advance.





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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Woodland Park, CO.
    Posts
    332
    I wouldn't do that. most fermenters are no pressure rated. It could cause pressure to build up in the jacket, making it rupture putting glycol the beer. always have it on the in leg of the fermenter.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    674
    Quote Originally Posted by brewmaster 2011 View Post
    I wouldn't do that. most fermenters are no pressure rated. It could cause pressure to build up in the jacket, making it rupture putting glycol the beer. always have it on the in leg of the fermenter.
    Put it on the inlet, and put A valve before it and on the return so you can isolate the tank. That way you can pressure test your coolant loop before filling it without pressurizing the tank jackets.
    Linus Hall
    Yazoo Brewing
    Nashville, TN
    [url]www.yazoobrew.com[/url]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
    Posts
    1,583
    Your jackets are a closed system. You will not fill nor empty them by valve location. Nor with pump suction or leaks. Or for that matter, pressure. You fill only by pushing the trapped air out of the jackets with glycol. That's why you put the glycol IN on the bottom! Conversely you empty by allowing air inside the jackets. Put the solenoid valve on the inlet. NOT ON THE OUTLET. Put a separate isolation valve and union for EACH supply and return glycol between the header and the fermenter piping/components/valve train. Your solenoid and/or isolation valves are not throttling (modulating) valves. They are either fully on or fully off. You will need to install an air eliminator on the highest point of your glycol supply and return lines/header. Might be best to have a professional install according to the principles outlined in the diagram you referred to. Best of luck.
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--
    Worldwide Brewery Installations
    www.GitcheGumeeBreweryServices.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    233
    On the inlet to fermenter. When you heat them up to clean them, the glycol will expand and needs to have way out.
    Paul Thomas
    Brewer
    Sockeye Brewing
    www.sockeyebrew.com

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