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Thread: cleaning

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    Wink cleaning

    HI Forumer:

    I recently obserd a white stone deposits in my Bright beer tanks. I'm using PBW. The same product performance in my Fermenters does not has that problem.
    Also, after rinsing I see a gel like substance coming out of the line (rinsing with water PBW out).
    After looking for variables that could have changed, I don't find any:

    * no change in minerals of water
    * cleaning temp. is the same (~155 -160*F)
    * pH of water is the same.
    I called FiveStar and they looking into the problem.
    Just wanted to see if any of you observed the same.

    Thanks,

    Fred

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    15
    Hi Fred,

    We use PBW followed by acid #6 when cleaning. We have a build up of what looks like white beer stone on the side of the tank but only in the tanks (brite and fermenter) that have top manways. The tanks with side manways are clean. Talk to Five Star as well and they could not figure it out. I think the PBW is reacting with the co2 that is left in the tank and causing the white precipitate. The side manways allow the co2 to escape so there is no problem. So far the white stone is impossible to get off.


    just a thought Tim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Redmond (Seattle), Wa
    Posts
    362
    make sure to evacuate your vessel of CO2, I would run the pump (CIP) with side manyways open or in the case of top ones, any open ports wide open for 5-10 minutes to purge the tank of CO2, then pour in your caustic. Also, make sure your caustic is completely disolved before your pour it in (powdered form). I mix it in hot water before and then pour it in.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    cleaning

    Quote Originally Posted by beerkeep
    Hi Fred,

    We use PBW followed by acid #6 when cleaning. We have a build up of what looks like white beer stone on the side of the tank but only in the tanks (brite and fermenter) that have top manways. The tanks with side manways are clean. Talk to Five Star as well and they could not figure it out. I think the PBW is reacting with the co2 that is left in the tank and causing the white precipitate. The side manways allow the co2 to escape so there is no problem. So far the white stone is impossible to get off.


    just a thought Tim
    That's a possibility. Even I run water to get ride of CO2, it looks like some is still in. I will try some other stuff and let you know.

    Thanks
    Fred

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    cleaning

    Quote Originally Posted by beauxman
    make sure to evacuate your vessel of CO2, I would run the pump (CIP) with side manyways open or in the case of top ones, any open ports wide open for 5-10 minutes to purge the tank of CO2, then pour in your caustic. Also, make sure your caustic is completely disolved before your pour it in (powdered form). I mix it in hot water before and then pour it in.
    I did not mention that my Bright beer tanks have top manways.
    I run enough water to eliminate CO2, maybe not enough......
    The PBW is completely dissolved; we dissolve in a bucket, mix well and than pour into the tank with hot water.

    Thanks,

    Fred

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    23
    Fred,
    From my experience, not following a "caustic" with acid can and will result in this build up. Especially the abrasive powders. Even if dissolved they seem to need acid to act as a ?stone? remover. I realize you are not talking about to same white residue left as from spillage/splash that appears on the outside. You are refering to the smaller, stone looking material on the rim of your manways and such. All I know to say is I have worked in breweries that are commited to following with acid and those that are not... Those that are following, do not ever seem to experience this. Those that do not, fight this every two months or so. Welcome to opinions and processes within.

    As far as how to get rid of it... be very very careful and try some nitric acid with gloves, mask and whatever else you feel needed and scrub. I works easier than phos. but more dangerous. Good luck!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    cleaning

    ...............From my experience, not following a "caustic" with acid can and will result in this build up

    Some suppliers recommend first "acid" cleaning, followed by "caustic".
    What are your thoughts on that?

    Fred

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    23
    Yea, I have heard of acid before caustic also. I have never done it nor have I worked with anyone who does. I guess my opinion is... as you know caustic is nasty stuff. And tough to rinse. So using the caustic with heat will no doubt break lose and pretty much "clean" most anything. After the caustic you triple rinse... is that enough? Sometimes yes sometimes no. So by following with acid, not only do I feel better considering the tank closer to brite, but at least better rinsed. I also believe when following with a no rinse sani, I would prefer the acid to be previous, opposed to the caustic. Ideally the the caustic and acid should neutralize each other. Leaving the sani to do its job.

    Back to the white residue... my opinion is it is build up. In other words residue, from those slight areas that never get properly rinsed. By the time it becomes noticable, you are scrubbing layer after layer.

    I realize time and cost are issues when adding another chemical and 20 min. cycle. To that I say pick your battles and jerry rig that scedule. You may be able to do acid every other cleaning cycle. And/or 15 min. caustic - 15 min. acid. I know we all do enough tedious scrubbing and surely do not like to add to it. I am not saying if you start following with acid, your problems will be solved overnight. However, I have seen a noticable difference when conforming to brewery to brewery's cleaning procedures. Try it for about three months, if it helps, adjust accordingly. If not let us know. Hopefully this provides some food for thought. Good luck and keep us informed!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Redmond (Seattle), Wa
    Posts
    362
    I agree with the acid schedule every few cycles. Once you remove your stone, this routine should keep it from coming back. We do this very routine and have good success. You spend a little more on chems but your tanks are tight!

    -Beaux

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    258

    cleaning

    Thanks for all the responses...................
    Will keep you posted.............................

    Fred

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    2
    the acid wash should remove it. The white buildup is probably a result of the caustic reacting with the oils in the tanks. the acid will react with any left over caustic just be careful espacially using nitric.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lansing, MI
    Posts
    144
    I tought PBW is non-caustic.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    186
    It is my understanding that "caustic" referes to NaOH or KOH, and because most sodium based cleaners are highly corrosive, caustic has become somewhat of a misnomer. PBW is made up of sodium meta-silicate, and is marketed as a "safe alternative to caustic." I find it is great for cleaning casks. Pour some in, and fill the cask with 150-154 degree water, and I can actually see particulate matter bubbling to the surface. As far as using it in CIP cycles, I find it to be more of a nucience. It always leaves a film, and I wind up having to reach in to the manway to scrub out the krausen ring, which kind of defeats the purpose of a cleaning cycle in the first place. I was told that it is a wonderful product to use in conjunction with caustic, but I've run CIP cycles having blended the 2, and I notice no difference in it's effectivness. Sorry to wander off the subject a bit, but I thought I would give my $.02. I used to swear by powdered brewery wash, now I just keep it around to clean my casks, and the occasional Corny keg for personal use.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Las Vegas
    Posts
    387
    A couple of things I have noticed about PBW. It works much better with soft water at low concentrations, like 1/2 -3/4 oz per gallon. It actually is not as effective at too high a concentration in soft water. I do use acid then PBW on the Kettle and Mash tun. And if I have a really filthy unitank that has had beer in it for a long time. So if you have soft water use less PBW and check the results. Also if you are cleaning bright tanks that have held filtered beer you should be able to use Acid #6 or an equivelant as a stand alone cleaner with no caustic/PBW. You can also clean under pressure if only using acid and this saves time and CO2. I will clean under pressure once then open the tank on the next round to visually check and i have had no problems when doing this. Occasionally I will use PBW just to be safe. Birko printed some articles about the logic behind acid then caustic. Rather than try to remember what was said I would refer you to Dana at Birko I'm sure he would answer your questions and forward this article.
    Big Willey
    "You are what you is." FZ

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Posts
    393
    What's your program for cleaning under pressure? How are you getting chemicals in...and rinse water out?

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