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Thread: conventional vent stack

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    42

    conventional vent stack

    Hi All,
    We are starting to put together the venting for our 7bbl brewhouse and we can't find a local duct company for our vent stack. I did some research and it looks like we need to use stainless steel and I was wondering who everyone else has used. Thanks
    Duffy Mahoney
    MickDuff's Brewing Co.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
    Posts
    304
    For the steam stack, we just used your average Home Depot galvanized duct. At both our sites, the kettles have condensate drainage methods that prevent the condensate from draining back into the kettle. We taped the lengthwise and joint seams with metallic seal tape, also available at Home Depot. The duct joints are held together with small, stainless screws.
    Our 7 bbl system stack is 11 years old and still great.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hastings, MI, USA
    Posts
    263
    Brian,
    what drainage methodology did you use on your stack vents? I have a 3 story run to put together....

    Thanks,

    Rob
    "By man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world" -- St. Arnold of Metz

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
    Posts
    304
    Hey, Rob.

    Teh top of our Specific Mechanical 15 Bbl kettle is an "onion" dome with an 8" Dia bolt flange at the top. It has an 8" Dia 90 Degree Elbow attached. attached to that is an 8" Tee with the in-line portion going up and down. The bottom of this in-line leg has a plate with a drain in it. The top of this in-line leg is where the vent duct attaches to and runs out the building.

    Basically, because there's an Elbow with this Tee, condensate can never run back into the wort, and instead goes out the drain at the bottom of the in-line leg of the Tee. It's pretty slick and simple.........probably why I've seen it used so often.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Helena, Montana
    Posts
    292
    When we were looking for extra stainless vent pipe material in our small town, the only place that had any was the specialty fire place/wood stove supply store. They had both 6" and 8" single wall stainless pipe, I guess its fairly commonly used in both wood and pellet stoves. Maybe worth a try...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
    Posts
    1,620
    If your town has any kind of fabrication capabilities, ask a sheet metal shop to roll up some thin stainless to any size you like. It's not very expensive; much cheaper than the UL rated, double wall, stainless steel, residential wood stove pipe.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    42

    Vent Stack

    So do we need to have a drain built in, so condensation doesn't run back into the kettle? I was planning on just running a straight pipe outside. The top of our kettle has a drain for the vent pipe built in. The pipe fits between two flanges and the flange has a drain so I figure water will run back down the pipe and the go out the drain. Will this work? Its a pub system for reference. Thanks
    MickDuff's Brewing Co.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Hastings, MI, USA
    Posts
    263
    Brian, thanks! Simplicity is sometimes so sweet in our industry, eh?

    Rob
    "By man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world" -- St. Arnold of Metz

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    38
    Mick-

    If your kettle has a built in condensate return ring, with the condensate draining away from the kettle, where the stack fits into, that should be all you'll need, drainagewise.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    McCall, Idaho
    Posts
    337
    Mornin',

    So we are going the local stove shop route. SS single wall for the steam and galvanized for the burner exhaust. My friend at the stove shop is asking for some intel on a couple concepts.

    1.Our kettle does not have a built in condensate ring. My friend believes he can build something that would work. He is thinking some kind of "reversed storm collar". We have a drain built into the wall for the small line that will come off of this. Any quick tips for a custom build I can give to him beyond the basic explanation I have given him. ie "prevent condensation from dripping back into the kettle".

    2. He is looking for field knowledge in regards to where the two stacks will exit the building.
    A. On the single wall galvanized burner exhaust. 400 btu (top end) propane burner. We both can only assume that it will be damn hot. Is anyone running single wall out of the building? Or double wall? Triple?
    Stack layout we have put together:90 degree turn out of kettle, straight up 5 feet, 45 and 4 ft. out gable wall, then 45 and 8 feet straight up.
    B. On the single wall SS kettle exhaust. Is anyone running single wall all the way out? I read on another thread (canyon) that an expansion joint where the stack goes out is recommended.
    Kettle stack layout: Straight up 2 ft. 45 and 10 ft and out gable wall, 45 and 3 ft up.

    My stove friends "worst case scenario" is single wall for everything and double wall thru the gable then back to single wall. But he has not done this before and wants to know if any red flags go up with folks who have the knowledge out there.
    FYI we are going out of the gable because the roof is metal and susceptible to damaging snow slides.

    Idaho has some leeway for performance based code sign offs in the field. If we can show the inspector that our system is logical and will perform safely he can make a call in the field even if it is contrary to "code" Hence we are designing this without inspector consultation in an effort to minimize any overbuild that the code body can often default too. We did consult our code official for the make up air for the burner. (And SO MANY other things..dear gawd.)

    thx a ton!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Homer, Alaska
    Posts
    93

    stacking up

    1.Think about BO (not body odor but boil over) as well as condensate. What will happen when you have BO? Can you clean it? Can you take it apart easily without dismantling the whole enchilada? Will the stack drain be big enough so it doesn't clog with crusty trub?

    2A. I recommend Type B stove vent (double wall galvy) with a proper thimble where you penetrate the building (a screened 1" air space around with larger diameter galvy single wall that actually is the sleeve touching the building)
    This is way more difficult going through at 45 degrees. Consider going horizontal through gable end and into a tee (drip leg with condensate drain) and vertical for rest of the way. All of this is assuming you are natural draft.
    2B. Ditto about 45 degree above. I recommend double wall outside if you can afford it so you get better draft for better evaporation rate. I have used galvy for the outside wall and made stainless U shaped pieces to rivet for holding the stainless inside in the middle. If you can't afford making up the double wall for outside don't worry about it. Single wall works.
    Glad you have help. Hope you've still been brewing at least small scale to keep the wheels greased!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    McCall, Idaho
    Posts
    337
    Quote Originally Posted by canyon
    1.Think about BO (not body odor but boil over) as well as condensate. What will happen when you have BO? Can you clean it? Can you take it apart easily without dismantling the whole enchilada? Will the stack drain be big enough so it doesn't clog with crusty trub?
    Great point Canyon!.....Jiminy...didnt even think about it. It has been noted.

    Quote Originally Posted by canyon
    Hope you've still been brewing at least small scale to keep the wheels greased!
    We have been brewing double batches once a month on our 10 gallon custom brewmagic style system. Not much but it keeps our feet grounded in what this is all about!!

    Thx again.

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