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Thread: Organic Sanitation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    52

    Organic Sanitation

    What is a good way of sanitizing a conical tank, while being able to say the beer is organic? Is iodine classed as organic?

  2. #2
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    Apr 2004
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    Hastings, MI, USA
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    Iodine is inorganic. And I wouldn't say that sanitizing a vessel with iodine, peracetic acid or whatever would nullify your saying a beer is organic, as you're not adding those sanitizers to the product. Others more versed in chemistry may very well chime in and prove my statements wrong
    "By man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world" -- St. Arnold of Metz

  3. #3
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    Redmond (Seattle), Wa
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    Even if the "leftovers" of sanitation made it into the product, organic requirements if I am right, specify a percentage of ingredients, right?

  4. #4
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    Jun 2005
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    Organic Sanitation

    Assuming all ingredients are organic, how would you sanitize a conical tank?

  5. #5
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    Apr 2004
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    Hastings, MI, USA
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    And I reiterate that I don't personally know of a santizing agent that is touted as being "organic". Good luck in your search.
    "By man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world" -- St. Arnold of Metz

  6. #6
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    Oct 2003
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    Santa Rosa CA USA
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    Steam or very hot water would qualify.

  7. #7
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    Oct 2002
    Location
    Macomb,Oklahoma
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    99

    Organic

    Organic is a registered description. You have to join the club as it were. There are federal requirements, state requirements and some private organizations. You must adhere to the proper one in your area to use the organic description.
    In Oklahoma the state has standards but also recognizes a couple of Organic associations.
    If you don't want to join one of the clubs go for using natural on the label!
    Doug A Moller
    Brewmaster
    Doug's Brau Haus
    (405)226-3111

  8. #8
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    Apr 2004
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    Hastings, MI, USA
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    Moonlight , got me on semantics! I wasn't thinking of anything other than manufactured chemical agents -- forgot completely about steam and 180F+ water.
    "By man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world" -- St. Arnold of Metz

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    52

    Organic Sanitation

    So I could heat my water in the HLT and fire it across to the conical. I would have to shut off one of the gylcol lines (but not both), and then toss the water back to the HLT - maybe push it out with CO2. A book I was reading a while ago suggested that very hot water in the conical could stress the tank, so I was hesitating on that method.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Colchester, Vermont
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    12

    sanitizing

    Our final step in sanitizing our conicles, and all of our vessels, is a hot solution of sodium hypochlorite followed by minimum 180 degree water (burns off residual sanitizer as well as santizes "by heat"). Obviously the chill loop is shut off and we push the final rinse out with nitrogen and allow the tank to cool under pressure and remains sealed until knock-out or transfer. This has not shown signs of stress on our tanks, and has been our process for 17 years.
    Hope this helps,
    Steve

  11. #11
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    Oct 2002
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    Tadcaster, Yorkshire, UK
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    Are your tanks made of stainless ? I assume so. Have you checked them for corrosion recently ?. If not, I suggest you do so, at the first available opportunity. You are likely to find little holes in the stainless where the chlorine has chewed its way in. You may even have the start of cracks developing best checked by use of a penetrating dye, possibly a specialist job. Hypo is best used at pH 11 +, in other words in a fairly strong caustic solution. At high temperatures, especially at low pH, the chlorine gets very agressive and chews up the chromium dioxide, the stuff that makes it stainless, allowing the iron portion of the steel to be oxidised

    If your tanks are epoxy lined (unlikely but not unknown) then this is also likely to be damaged

    Check them NOW, and use a different sterilant regime
    dick

  12. #12
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    Redmond (Seattle), Wa
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    Maybe I am wrong, but doesn't the whole organic product claim mean that the "ingredients" are organic (non-pesticide) grown (Grain, hops)? I don't make organic beer but I would assume thats what it means....am I wrong?

    -Beaux

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Reno, Nevada USA
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    340

    Arrow organic sanitizing

    The following is from the Nevada Dept of Agriculture handbook
    which is accredited by the USDA.. We will use this for our, made with
    "Organic" seasonal beer.
    Check local Ag department handbooks to cross reference.
    These are substances allowed as ingredients to disinfect
    and sanitize food contact surfaces. Residual chlorine levels
    in the water shall not exceed maximum residual disinfectant
    limit under the safe water drinking act:
    Sodium Hypochlorite, Hydrogen Peroxide, Chlorine Dioxide,
    Phosphoric Acid, Potassium Carbonate.
    If you need expert advice I would contact Brett Cooperrider
    @ Ukiah Brewing in Ukiah California they are a 100% organic
    pub and brewery I am sure he can supply some insight into your
    organic questions.
    good luck and send some samples

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    8

    organic sani

    Ive been making certified organic beers for 6 years now and the CCOF requires us to use periocytic acid as long as its rinsed off afterwards
    been using it as directed then rinsing / final rinse with 180` water
    and have yet to have a problem

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Helena, Montana
    Posts
    292
    Our brewery is also certified organic.

    Since the advent of the National Organic Program several years ago, you cannot make any organic claim to a product without having it certified. There are 3 levels of certification, 100% Organic, Organic (>95% organic ingredients) and Made With Organic Ingredients (at least 70% organic ingredients). Each level of certification does address some "processing aids" differently.

    In regards to 100% Organic and Organic products, my understanding is that you can use almost any chemical sanitizer you choose, however, all except chlorine dioxide must be followed by a final potable water rinse. If you use chlorine dioxide in a no-rinse situation, then you must test the level of chlorine present on the surface of the equipment prior to contact with organic product. I believe there is currently an attempt (by some processors) to change the NOP standards to allow the use of peroxyacetic acid as an organic approved no-rinse sanitizer. When in doubt there is always lots of 180F water......Hope that helps!

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