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Thread: Extract Tables

  1. #1
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    Extract Tables

    I'm looking for extract tables on the web that give me the kg/hl extract for a value in Plato or SG. Be a nice feature to add to this site. Any help? Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
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    Your suppliers will always have the details of potential (laboratory analysis) extract. You should be able to get details of all the products they supply, in the format you need.

    This applies to sugars, malts, and other dry adjuncts

    The achievable extract will depend on the equipment used, and the process used. This will vary from over 100 % of lab extract (honest - it does happen) down to..... well pick your %age.

    Sorry, but I don't have a wide range of extracts available at present, but will keep an eye out (I don't do the extracts regulalry any more)
    dick

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by gitchegumee
    I'm looking for extract tables on the web that give me the kg/hl extract for a value in Plato or SG. Be a nice feature to add to this site. Any help? Thanks in advance!
    Well I don't know about those funny foreign metric measurements, but I can give you the formula for determining pounds of extract per barrel of wort.

    (Weight of a bbl of water + deg. Plato) X the gravity = lbs. extract per bbl

    Example (12 deg. P wort):

    (259 lbs + 12) X .12 = 32.52 lbs. extract/bbl

    If you can find a supercool Wallerstein Labs Brew Computer (mine is from 1961, I'm still looking for another one as mine is pretty chewed up), there's a slide-rule feature that correlates SG, Plato, pounds extract per US BBL (31 gal), pounds extract per Canadian BBL (25 imperial gals), pounds extract per British BBL (36 imperial gals) and kilograms extract per hectoliter.

    ---Guy
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    Last edited by pennbrew2; 02-03-2006 at 09:51 AM. Reason: Add picture

  4. #4
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    I did some quick conversions, there's bound to be rounding errors but here's an extract chart. A bit truncated, I could flesh it out more if anyone wants.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by pennbrew2; 02-03-2006 at 10:41 AM.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for your help! I'm used to using a table from Siebel that gives extract weight per volume in great detail. Thought that it would be available on the web somewhere. I can interpolate the chart you've given me. Thanks again!

  6. #6
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    Couldnt you just create a simple Excell spreadsheet using the formulas you need? My recipe sheets are all Excel and it is nice to be able to instantly see the effect of grist changes on extract. You can also easily account for your particular brewhouse efficiency that way. If you brew regular strength and High gravity your bound to have different efficiencies. Just a thought.
    Big Willey
    "You are what you is." FZ

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigWilley
    Couldnt you just create a simple Excell spreadsheet using the formulas you need? My recipe sheets are all Excel and it is nice to be able to instantly see the effect of grist changes on extract. You can also easily account for your particular brewhouse efficiency that way. If you brew regular strength and High gravity your bound to have different efficiencies. Just a thought.
    That's what I did, created a spreadsheet with the formula. To be of maximum value, it can show the values for every tenth of a degree Plato.

    Please note that this is a representation of the amount of extract in the wort. Your particular brewhouse, brewing practices and malt used will affect your yield. If you're shooting for a 12 Plato wort, and you know you get (for instance) a 71% yield from your malt, then you'd need 32.52 lbs / .71 = 45.8 pounds of malt per bbl.

  8. #8
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    Extract tables are determined empirically as opposed to formulaically. Commissioning new equipment requires a precise extract table to determine brewhouse efficiency. That and a grain analysis. Otherwise, for every day use, a formula can be used to estimate recipe grain requirements. I've found these extract tables in many texts, but cannot on line. Thanks for the help!

  9. #9
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    Extract Calc Pretty Close

    Here are the extract calculations I use in my spreadsheet. Its been 10 years since I made my beer formula spreadsheet, but I do remember that the formula compared well with the published extract tables. Put this in your spreadsheet and determine your Brewing material efficiency and your all set.

    P.S. If you want the sheets I could scan them and email them to you, But it will take me some time. to dig them out. Are you Siebel alum? they will mail them to you.

    Double click the table in the attachment to see the formula
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by gr8brew; 02-09-2006 at 02:21 PM.
    Just another brewslut

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