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Thread: Rice usage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Rice usage

    How do you cook and mash with rice in a simple infusion brewery? Techniques and suggestions are much appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    rice cooking...

    mate

    my first port of call is to locate Jeff Renner (i am sure Jeff is now a board member of the AOB) and he will fill you in on everything to do with using rice.

    For a home brewery it is simple, boil for 20 mins and add into the mash. For a larger requirements a cereal cooker, which can be obtained commerically, can be obtained.

    If you cannot locate jeff, drop me a line at scotty@nnlbeersupplies.com.au and I will send Jeff a note.

    Jeff has been the tour-de-force of the (in)famous CAP, is a pure gentleman and one whose wisdom on adjunct brewing is beyond question.
    Head Brewer Rocks Brewing Co.
    Sydney, Aust
    scotty@rocksbrewing.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Hastings, MI, USA
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    Talking A quick and dirty solution...

    Flaked rice. Pre-gelatinized and ready for your single-step infusion system.

    Rock the Rice!
    "By man's sweat and God's love, beer came into the world" -- St. Arnold of Metz

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    121

    Thumbs up

    Briess has brown rice syrup you can add to the kettle, its ok...but I liked the 45DE Clear Rice Syrup from http://www.internationalmolasses.com/phone.html
    It rocked! Great flavors, slightly less crisp than using whole rice (used that also). That company also makes Oat syrup that kicks-@ss too! No more stuck mashes. They have other useful products also. No additives and just what they say they are. I dealt with the folks out of Texas. I've used the flaked products also, but the rice oils go rancid very quickly and those products are always stale by the time they reach you. If you are brewing a non-pale beer you probably wont notice, but if you're making a pale light lager, it will show through.

    Now if you say syrups are cheating---you've already compromised your beer by wanting to add rice or oats.....

    Good luck,
    B

  5. #5
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    Thanks!

    These suggestions are appreciated. Happy to hear the Reinheitsgebot isn't the rule of the world! I want to use broken rice. Not something I have to import from US, but plain, white rice. I have a direct fired 10 bbl kettle that I'd like to make a rice soup in, and then use this for hot liquor by pumping it to the mash tun through the vorlauf inlet. If I boil 500-600 liters of water and add 40 kg of rice, turn off the heat, and wait an hour, is this sufficient to properly gelatinize the rice? It just has to be cooked, right? I would then stir up the rice and set my kettle pump to the highest speed to keep the momentum of flow and blast the rice soup into the tun. I figure that the temperature of the soupy liquor would be close to the strike zone by now (72C). Then I plan to stir in the malt, and then rest one hour, gently recirculate for 30 minutes to clear the wort and set a fluffy bed, and lauter slowly. I don't want to use rice hulls. Is this a recipe for disaster, or a legitimate schedule?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Sydney
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    rice...

    i usually boil for 20 mins and you have to be careful as the rice takes on alot of water and can scorch easily. I then go into the mash and use beer smith to work out the temperature bits and peiced.

    using both flaked product and using the standard boil method have noticed no difference in profile.

    Scotty
    Head Brewer Rocks Brewing Co.
    Sydney, Aust
    scotty@rocksbrewing.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    India
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    138
    Alternativley, you can use a double mash or modified decotion with your rice.
    Mash in at 35C or 50C and then add the rice to raise the temperature to conversion.

    Never used the "soup" method, but either way, I would stir and heat the rice to about 70C and hold for a short duration to ensure the rice does not solidify. (can not pump it) After, bring to a boil and hold for at least 20 minutes.

    What % is you rice bill?
    "disaster, or a legitimate schedule?" Let us know!

  8. #8
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    Jan 2003
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    Palau
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    Thanks Matt! I've used that double mash technique with Pilsner beers. Works great. Rice is 25% of the grist. I would do a low temperature rest if I was concerned about haze, but with 25% rice I think I'd rather keep what I have for head formation/retention. Why else would I do a rest? Glucan degredation possibly leading to an easier sparge?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    India
    Posts
    138
    As far as holding the rice at 70C, again is to ensure the rice does not solidify(gum up) but with your rice to liquor ratio should not be a major concern, though you seem to being using a high percentage of rice.( I've used up to 15%, extract value)
    As far as the main mash goes, if you are set up for temperature control, holding at lower temperature may squeeze a little more extract, fermentable, out of your mash. Also depending on the style, will help produce a lighter, dryer beer, as well as the glucan / sparging issue.
    Question. Are you using a mash pump or just the kettle pump to move the rice over?

    Let us know the results, good or......

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