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Thread: Author Request Beer & Food

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Plainfield IL USA
    Posts
    14

    Author Request Beer & Food

    Maybe you folks can help me here...

    I'm working on a manuscript for a book titled, BEER & FOOD: An American History, to be published in the fall by Jefferson Press www.jeffersonpress.com

    I'm hoping for your help in assembling a final chapter of food recipes using beer but with a historical or regional bent. If any brewpubs or breweries out there have a beer in their portfolio that is brewed to an old pre-Proh recipe (maybe with some corn) or uses adjuncts like molasses (as in an old colonial era stout), I'd like to hear from them. I'm especially interested in a combination of an old-styled brew and a regional dish---one playing off the other...Capital 1900 and brats, for instance, or a porter made with some molasses that could be paired with a colonial-era food recipe.

    No Belgians. This is a history/cookbook about American beers and American foods.

    This is from my publisher's site and gives an idea of what will be in the book:

    Beer and Food: An American History
    In his sixth book, recognized American brewing expert (they write this, not me), Bob Skilnik, sets out to document the parallel evolution of the United States brewing industry as it has shaped American cookery from colonial times to Prohibition to its continuing influence in today's modern kitchens. Beer and Food stands as an enthralling piece of historical non-fiction with its tight and widely-unknown narrative about the birth and rise of our national brewing industry and the resulting changes in the preparation of both familiar and esoteric dishes. Whether it's beer-boiled brats, wild salmon grilled on cedar planks, or rich brownies washed down with a creamy stout, Skilnik uncovers the origins and history behind scores of beer-related foods in his own descriptive, polished style. In short, this title has the ability to grab and fascinate every type of reader; beer enthusiasts will discover, among other things, the development and legacy of the lightening of brews in the United States, as well as the recent surge in microbreweries; historians and appreciators of American food will embrace the author's unique slant on our national cuisine; and all will want to keep Beer and Food near the kitchen as it describes and lists the recipes for 101 beer-included or related dishes!

    A food recipe or two that utilizes an old-styled beer, perhaps with a bit of history behind it, would be appreciated. The last chapter of the book will be a nice vehicle for FREE publicity for any cooperating brewery or brewpub.

    Any questions, comments?

    Thanks,

    Bob Skilnik
    815.557.4608

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    51
    http://www.probrewer.com/vbulletin/s...ead.php?t=5222

    Bob, you already posted this once......

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Plainfield IL USA
    Posts
    14

    I Know

    It was suggested to me by one of the mods to try posting the request in the recipe formulation section since the response to my first post in the general discussion has been limp.

    Seems nobody wants some FREE publicity.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    San Luis Obispo, CA
    Posts
    83
    Hi Toddlingtown,

    I used to work for Glenwood Canyon Brewing Company in Glenwood Springs, Colorado. I co-developed a recipe with them, which was a pre-proh pils with the use of corn. We released the beer as our batch 1000 in 2005. We had recently made a discovery of a brewery which was once in Glenwood Springs but burnt down. This beer was released around the time of this discovery. If you would like to discuss more in detail, you can contact me or visit glenwoodcanyon.com. I can be contacted here. todd@toddmalloybrewer.com and would love to share as much information as possible. I don't know if this is quite what you are looking for but....

    Here is a breif excerpt from the webpage glenwoodcanyon.com

    "Also in 1914, William and Walter Wilhelmy opened a brewery a few blocks away, near the corner of Tenth Street and Pitkin Avenue. It was called the Home Brewing Company and they planned to brew up to 15,000 barrels a year. Unfortunately, Colorado passed a prohibition law that went into effect on January 1, 1916. The brewery also suffered a fire during its brief existence and all that remains are some old beer labels."


    -Regards

    todd

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