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Thread: Dry Hopping Overflow

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Dallas, Bangalore and soon Goa
    Posts
    193
    We have a 2” butterfly on a 2” port on top of our tanks at the brewpub. We spund. A 2” to 4” reducer and a roughly 18” section of 4” stainless triclamp pipe. 4” cap on the bottom.

    Fill tube with dry hops, flip upside down onto hop port butterfly. Attach and open valve. Viola, dry hop under pressure with no eruptions. Close vale, remove tube, repeat as needed. PRV will release gas sometimes, but provides enough back pressure to avoid foaming.

    Have used a slurry brink, “regular” method, and a hop Gun on larger tanks (up to 120bbl). Prefer this for simplicity. Didn’t get much “benefit” from the Gun when considering the cost. Use the slurry and brink for big tanks.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by UnFermentable View Post
    We have a 2” butterfly on a 2” port on top of our tanks at the brewpub. We spund. A 2” to 4” reducer and a roughly 18” section of 4” stainless triclamp pipe. 4” cap on the bottom.

    Fill tube with dry hops, flip upside down onto hop port butterfly. Attach and open valve. Viola, dry hop under pressure with no eruptions. Close vale, remove tube, repeat as needed. PRV will release gas sometimes, but provides enough back pressure to avoid foaming.

    Have used a slurry brink, “regular” method, and a hop Gun on larger tanks (up to 120bbl). Prefer this for simplicity. Didn’t get much “benefit” from the Gun when considering the cost. Use the slurry and brink for big tanks.
    That's a pretty slick little setup from the sounds it it.


    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    218
    Quote Originally Posted by istuntmanmike View Post
    Oh, I gotcha. Then I would maybe try adding less hops to begin the offgassing. Throw in a handful, let it offgas a little, repeat until it's blown off. That's kinda what I did on 7-8bbl batches, and didn't experience anything blowing off other than CO2. It didn't take much hops to blow it down to the point that I could toss in the rest because it would pile up on top and not even be adding to nucleation sites to cause offgassing anyways. Then I would close the blowoff valve and hit the bottom with the CO2 bursts, watch your headspace pressure depending on your headspace vol bc there will be extra pressure from the added CO2 as well as from mixing in the hops and whatever is still at the bottom of the tank. You might have to vent some pressure depending on how much more CO2 is going to offgass immediately and how much will be created by the rest of the fermentation. I would let it build up to ~15psi or more (depending on headspace volume), cold crash the beer and have it naturally carbonated by the time it was all said and done.
    Thanks for this. I just brewed another batch in our experimental IPA series. The goal is #1/bbl with 1 playing left and then another #1/bbl after yeast has been dumped (and blows from the bottom with CO2

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Nevada City, CA
    Posts
    292
    Quote Originally Posted by UnFermentable View Post
    We have a 2” butterfly on a 2” port on top of our tanks at the brewpub. We spund. A 2” to 4” reducer and a roughly 18” section of 4” stainless triclamp pipe. 4” cap on the bottom.

    Fill tube with dry hops, flip upside down onto hop port butterfly. Attach and open valve. Viola, dry hop under pressure with no eruptions. Close vale, remove tube, repeat as needed. PRV will release gas sometimes, but provides enough back pressure to avoid foaming.

    Have used a slurry brink, “regular” method, and a hop Gun on larger tanks (up to 120bbl). Prefer this for simplicity. Didn’t get much “benefit” from the Gun when considering the cost. Use the slurry and brink for big tanks.
    Nice! That's a +1 for coolness factor. Have a picture? I switched to the brink/slurry method a while ago and prefer it for results, but definitely not for its complexity...
    Dave Cowie
    Three Forks Bakery & Brewing Company
    Nevada City, CA

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