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Thread: How much square footage do kegs take up

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Springfield, MO, USA
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    17

    How much square footage do kegs take up

    Hello gentleman,

    I have been scouring the internet looking for an answer to this question and not having much luck. Perhaps my google-fu isn't quite strong enough, but I am hoping someone here might have some insights for me.

    My intention is to develop a formula to roughly estimate the cold storage requirements for x amount of kegs. I know the dimensions of a 1/2 bbl keg but what I do not know is are they commonly put on pallets, or not, are they stacked when full and if so how high.

    Much appreciation to anyone out there who can share their knowledge with me.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Austin
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    19
    This is what I found on a different thread previously. (8) 1/2 BBL kegs, (20) 1/6 BBL kegs, ((16) 1/4 BBL?) on a 40x48 pallet assuming they are double stacked.

    I am figuring my cold storage assuming (4) per pallet, and stacked (3) kegs high using a small pallet stacker. Assuming (3) kegs high, that would be 12 kegs in about 13.3 sqft in a 10' tall cold room. Note that you will also need to include space between the stacks to get a pallet stacker in there.

    I hope this helps.
    Brandon Besser, P.E.
    "He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom" - Gandalf

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Leadville, CO
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    235
    Eight 1/2 bbl kegs will slightly overlap the 40" dimension of a pallet when close-packed (three rows, 3-2-3), so roughly 18 ft2 or 2.25 ft2/keg when you allow for a little maneuvering room. Stacking is common - I've been induced to stack three-high on occasion but in my opinion that's a dubious option safety-wise and unless your cellarman is a giant even unassisted two-high stacking is unwise. So 1.1-2.3 ft2/keg depending on whether they're stacked.

    Without pallets you can do better: if you had an arbitrarily large field of 16.5" diameter close-packed kegs the density would be ~90%, or 1.0 ft2/keg. Of course that may not be realistic in a cold room, where you want to actually move kegs in and out without moving all their neighbors. So you're right back to a square lattice 16.5" on a side, which is 1.2 ft2/keg.

    So basically it comes down to how you want to store and move kegs - whether your cellarman can/should stack, whether you're using pallets, etc.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Georgetown, Texas, USA
    Posts
    9

    Something to think about to increase cold room capacity and increase safety

    Hi Jim,

    The previous respondent addressed the foot-print area of the kegs admirably well - high-lighting how the 1/2 bbl kegs do slightly over-hang on the 40" dimension of the std 48" x 40" GMA pallets. I can't improve on that advice previously provided, however I can offer a system which will bring down the height of keg stacks in your cool room. My company Brewery Plastics Inc manufactures Transit Layer Boards ( TLBs) for all the common keg sizes. Our TLB's take the place of standard pallets between the layers of kegs. With only a 1" profile for the 1/2 bbl version ( compared to 5" to 6" for a wooden pallet ) this dramatically reduces stack height as you build up layers of kegs.
    Furthermore, with a retention ring for each keg position AND retention blocks projecting upwards into the chimb space of kegs above and downwards into the chimb spaces of kegs below, kegs are locked into position far more positively and safely than with wooden pallets.
    Naturally, these space saving and safety benefits extend to the keg filling room and warehouse spaces, as well as making keg transport a whole lot safer.
    Our plastic layer boards will last up to 7 years. They are UV stable and can be used outdoors as well as indoors. They won't get heavier when wet and won't suffer all the splintering and other deterioration, which wooden pallets typically display. So no throwing away wooden pallets and incurring lost expenses.

    To see more about our TLB's being used with kegs, visit our website at

    www.breweryplastics.com

    Feel free to call me on 512.915.5358 if you'd like to see more materials and learn more about plastic Layer Boards from Brewery Plastics Inc. We are located in Georgetown Texas.
    Best regards,
    Andrew Rhodes

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Bainbridge Island, WA
    Posts
    757
    Quote Originally Posted by bbesser View Post
    This is what I found on a different thread previously. (8) 1/2 BBL kegs, (20) 1/6 BBL kegs, ((16) 1/4 BBL?) on a 40x48 pallet assuming they are double stacked.

    I am figuring my cold storage assuming (4) per pallet, and stacked (3) kegs high using a small pallet stacker. Assuming (3) kegs high, that would be 12 kegs in about 13.3 sqft in a 10' tall cold room. Note that you will also need to include space between the stacks to get a pallet stacker in there.

    I hope this helps.
    Stacking three high is doable, but can be nerve racking sometimes. You'll want to plastic wrap at least any sixtel stacks for safety. And nobody should be manually getting kegs off a 3 high, so you'll need to take the top stack down to unload it. Which is a pain if you just need one keg... So busy workers will be inclined to try and just get that one keg off the top, and that's how accidents happen.

    And while you can theoretically fit 3 high stacks in a 10' cold room, in reality you will run into problems if you're not careful. Door overhangs, light fixtures, and fire suppression systems, will all get in the way for example.
    Russell Everett
    Co-Founder / Head Brewer
    Bainbridge Island Brewing
    Bainbridge Island, WA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Medellin, Colombia
    Posts
    66
    Are you guys familliar with the tech where you load kegs vertically and they feed down.... Almost like an ammo clip?

    Would like to fond for myself. Make sense?
    I have s

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Springfield, MO, USA
    Posts
    17
    Thank you all for the insights. It has been very helpful.

    Cheers!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Bainbridge View Post
    Stacking three high is doable, but can be nerve racking sometimes. You'll want to plastic wrap at least any sixtel stacks for safety. And nobody should be manually getting kegs off a 3 high, so you'll need to take the top stack down to unload it. Which is a pain if you just need one keg... So busy workers will be inclined to try and just get that one keg off the top, and that's how accidents happen.

    And while you can theoretically fit 3 high stacks in a 10' cold room, in reality you will run into problems if you're not careful. Door overhangs, light fixtures, and fire suppression systems, will all get in the way for example.
    I was thinking three stacks with a pallet separating each layer of kegs to start with. That should end up with a total stack height around 7'-0" with around 3' of clearance, but I definitely had not considered any fire suppression requirements inside the cold room. Also had not considered how much the stacker could extend above the kegs.

    Thanks for the additional considerations!
    Brandon Besser, P.E.
    "He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom" - Gandalf

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    418
    Everyone has touched well on the space that the pallets take up, another equally important factor is how you move them around. Depending on the forklift, they need a certain amount of space to turn into the pallet, so straight sqft of kegs is not what is needed unless you are hand stacking everything(which is a workmans comp. claim waiting to happen.) 40x48 pallets of kegs, 4 levels high is what we do, the top level has strapping to keep the bundle together. We use a walkie stacker forklift to move everything around.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Hammond, IN
    Posts
    8

    Use a Keg Jockey

    We manufacture the Keg Jockey lift for this exact problem, as well as avoiding workman's comp claims, we can stack kegs up to 4 high.
    Check us out HERE.
    If you have any questions contact me.
    joe@vermettlifts.com

    Name:  Keg Jockey 300 20140822.gif
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    Last edited by kegjockeylift; 10-19-2016 at 04:09 PM. Reason: Spelling

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