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Thread: Walk in Cooler sizing 10 bbl

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Olympia, WA, USA
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    25

    Walk in Cooler sizing 10 bbl

    Hi all, I searched the forum and did not find too much that related to my brewery sizing. I am bumping up from a 2 bbl to a 10 bbl brewery and am trying to determine what size of a walk in cooler we need. This is our goal...


    1,000 bbl a year production
    70% in-house and 30% dist as kegs
    4 unit tanks (ferment and condition only) and 4 serving tanks (all glycol chilled, not stored in cooler)

    We want 8-10 beers on tap at a time, that means 4-6 batches in kegs (40-60bbls or 80-120 kegs)

    We also need space for hops and some yeast strains that we are keeping cold for future use

    Is it crazy to have that many kegs sitting in a cooler? We plan on getting more glycoled serving tanks in the future but will start with just 4. Any ideas?

    I was thinking roughly 350 sq ft. Overkill?

    The sketch would allow for 140 kegs and space for hops/yeast

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Newcastle NSW Australia
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    166
    Do you plan to run insulated lines from the serving tanks into the walk in cooler to connect to FOB and Beer pump? You would also have your keg coupler and regulator. there for kegs that are racked from the bottom of the serving tank. You would then run the serving line through a glycol chilled python to your taps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Olympia, WA, USA
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    25
    Quote Originally Posted by TiminOz View Post
    Do you plan to run insulated lines from the serving tanks into the walk in cooler to connect to FOB and Beer pump? You would also have your keg coupler and regulator. there for kegs that are racked from the bottom of the serving tank. You would then run the serving line through a glycol chilled python to your taps.
    I know I will need insulated lines but not sure if I needed the fob or beer pump. Still need to look into that side of things. Mostly focusing on the cooler at the moment

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Nevada City, CA
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    274
    I don't have a wealth of experience to offer -- just 2.5 years in a 7bbl brewpub that sells about 90% in house and the rest in kegs. And at about half your barrelage estimate. But my first take was that you're looking at a LOT of kegging. I started with 4 BT's (single wall) in our cooler servicing 8 taps. The rest in kegs. I have since added 2 more BTs in the cooler and the reduced time kegging **just to service in house taps** makes me...happy. I get that each space/situation is different, and that you are looking at jacketed brites vs. cooler brites, but I would advocate, if your dollar can stretch it, more BTs, especially if it mostly going to your taps (and a 70/30 ratio seems that way to me) and less kegging (filling/washing/sani).

    My 2 cents.
    Dave Cowie
    Three Forks Bakery & Brewing Company
    Nevada City, CA

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    54

    Serving tanks

    I would really recommend that you get serving tanks right away. The upfront cost might be higher, but in the long run you´ll save so much labor, time and money. Also means you can have a smaller cold room.
    Marius Graff,
    Head Brewer, Graff Brygghus
    Tromsø, Norway

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Olympia, WA, USA
    Posts
    25
    Great thoughts. I may look at our budget again and see if we can afford more tanks from the beginning

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    20
    Something else to consider is if you have enough room in the aisle to get a pallet stacker in there to move pallets of kegs around. Looks like there is plenty of room if you dont have the center row of kegs in there. Also looks like a bit of a pain to move that center row and your hops to get to the beer in the way back corners.
    Brandon Besser, P.E.
    "He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom" - Gandalf

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by barleyfreak View Post
    I don't have a wealth of experience to offer -- just 2.5 years in a 7bbl brewpub that sells about 90% in house and the rest in kegs. And at about half your barrelage estimate. But my first take was that you're looking at a LOT of kegging. I started with 4 BT's (single wall) in our cooler servicing 8 taps. The rest in kegs. I have since added 2 more BTs in the cooler and the reduced time kegging **just to service in house taps** makes me...happy. I get that each space/situation is different, and that you are looking at jacketed brites vs. cooler brites, but I would advocate, if your dollar can stretch it, more BTs, especially if it mostly going to your taps (and a 70/30 ratio seems that way to me) and less kegging (filling/washing/sani).

    My 2 cents.
    We're looking at starting with 4 - 7 BBL single wall serving tanks inside the cooler, kegging of the last 1/3 of them for the other 4 taps and then rotating in new beers back into the serving tanks. (TOTAL OF 8 TAPS)

    What size cooler did you use for this similar setup? And also have you noticed CIPing tanks inside the walking to be annoying?

    Dustin Baker
    Roadmap Brewing
    San Antonio, TX

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Nevada City, CA
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    274
    Quote Originally Posted by DBakes15 View Post
    We're looking at starting with 4 - 7 BBL single wall serving tanks inside the cooler, kegging of the last 1/3 of them for the other 4 taps and then rotating in new beers back into the serving tanks. (TOTAL OF 8 TAPS)

    What size cooler did you use for this similar setup? And also have you noticed CIPing tanks inside the walking to be annoying?

    Dustin Baker
    Roadmap Brewing
    San Antonio, TX
    Our cooler is 8'x24'. CIP'ing is not a huge deal. Sure, it can get cold, but I just find myself getting faster at the set up. Cramped too, but that's just the way of it. When filling kegs i use a GW Kent filler that stops flow when full so I don't have to be in the cooler. Since it is adjacent to the brewery it is all right there, and pretty convenient. I do CIP cold with acid which I would HIGHLY recommend. I break down/vent CO2 and do a hot clean with alkaline/acid afte every 1/2 dozen or so acid cleaning cycles. But I choose our closed day for that since it warms up the lines to the taps and they get foaming. Either that or a first thing in the AM before beer drinking starts in earnest out front.
    Dave
    Dave Cowie
    Three Forks Bakery & Brewing Company
    Nevada City, CA

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
    Posts
    7
    Quote Originally Posted by barleyfreak View Post
    Our cooler is 8'x24'. CIP'ing is not a huge deal. Sure, it can get cold, but I just find myself getting faster at the set up. Cramped too, but that's just the way of it. When filling kegs i use a GW Kent filler that stops flow when full so I don't have to be in the cooler. Since it is adjacent to the brewery it is all right there, and pretty convenient. I do CIP cold with acid which I would HIGHLY recommend. I break down/vent CO2 and do a hot clean with alkaline/acid afte every 1/2 dozen or so acid cleaning cycles. But I choose our closed day for that since it warms up the lines to the taps and they get foaming. Either that or a first thing in the AM before beer drinking starts in earnest out front.
    Dave
    What type of drainage do you have inside the cooler? The warming up the cooler with the CIP was my major concern, how big of a difference have you noticed on the temp. when you do a hot clean? I have been thinking that it would just make sense to do that first thing in the morning, but if now fear it won't get back to temp before our 4 pm opening. Thoughts?
    Dustin Baker

    Owner/Brewer
    Roadmap Brewing Co.
    San Antonio, TX

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Nevada City, CA
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    274
    Quote Originally Posted by DBakes15 View Post
    What type of drainage do you have inside the cooler? The warming up the cooler with the CIP was my major concern, how big of a difference have you noticed on the temp. when you do a hot clean? I have been thinking that it would just make sense to do that first thing in the morning, but if now fear it won't get back to temp before our 4 pm opening. Thoughts?
    I have a trench drain inside the cooler. The temp is enough to effect the beer lines only, but not the tank/keg beer temps. The air temp might go from 35-37 to as much as 50-55 before I am finally done. That said however, the temp returns back to 35-37 pretty fast. Since the beer in the tanks and kegs is relatively unaffected, the lines will cool back down just as fast. If you were to do it first thing in the morning, you should have no problem whatsoever if you don't serve until 4pm. If you do, then your cooler is not particularly robust!

    Dave
    Dave Cowie
    Three Forks Bakery & Brewing Company
    Nevada City, CA

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Newark, Delware, USA
    Posts
    2

    Serving Tanks

    We have 5 15bbl serving tanks if you might be interested.

    Quote Originally Posted by CascadiaHB View Post
    Great thoughts. I may look at our budget again and see if we can afford more tanks from the beginning

    Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk

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