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Thread: Ultraviolet Dechlorination

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Kingston
    Posts
    3

    Ultraviolet Dechlorination

    I've been researching dechlorination and came across some information on the use of high intensity ultraviolet light to breakdown both Chlorine and Chloramine. Chloramine is being used more and more by city water utilities, so this type of system seems like a good solution to get ride of it. Does anyone used this in their brewery?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Thousand Oaks, CA.
    Posts
    7

    Chlorine and Chloramines Removal

    Although high intensity UV treatment can be used for removing Chlorine and Chloramines in city water treatment plants, it is not practical for breweries, in our opinion.

    We recommend using a Catalytic Carbon filter and 20-50 mesh. This low maintenance filter will remove both of these chemicals. With the 20-50 mesh, you will use 1/2 the water in the back wash cycles. The filter will also remove most other chemicals in the water where the UV willl not.

    All of our units have a digital, programmable valve with only one moving part. The valve is made in the USA. The Catalytic Carbon will last 3 to 5 years before it needs to be changed.

    Thank You. Jimmy Fagan
    CraftBrewWater.com
    805-777-7037

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Picton, Ontario
    Posts
    5
    Over here in picton our ecolab supplier has sold a bunch of the breweries a high flow cartridge system for chlorine removal. The municipal water in picton is highly chlorinated so you could inquire with them on the specs our ecolab contacts name is Jonathan, but I am pretty sure your area has a different contact. Feel free to PM me if you need contact info.

    Cheers,

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
    Posts
    1,870

    Backwash?

    Don't mean to hijack the thread, but how could back washing "regenerate" a carbon filter? I've never back washed any carbon filter, but simply change out the carbon when we detect any chlorine.
    Phillip Kelm--Palau Brewing Company Manager--

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    197
    Quote Originally Posted by gitchegumee View Post
    Don't mean to hijack the thread, but how could back washing "regenerate" a carbon filter? I've never back washed any carbon filter, but simply change out the carbon when we detect any chlorine.
    This is backwashing as in a sand filter, not regeneration like in a softener. The backwash doesn't regenerate the filter, it's to remove any particulate, or other ickyness that may have accumulated. I used to backflush the carbon bed on my water systems, but as I recall, it wasn't very often.

    Regards,
    Mike Sharp

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Ontario, California
    Posts
    5

    UV dechlorination and backwashing

    Totally agree with the backwashing carbon designs. They only need intermittent backwashing but the systems we get back that do not get backwashed are typically heavily fouled and we see a lot of channeling. The benefits of a quick intermittent backwash is substantial and it typically allows the use of a finer mesh carbon which is far more effective at chloramine reduction. 20x50 mesh carbon has difficulties with maintaining higher flow rates but the backwash cycle typically resolves that problem.
    As to the UV for chloramine/chlorine reduction, we use it in very specific applications, brewing is not one of them. Ultra high purity water where carbon poses its own unique problems... circuit board manufacturing, pharma water etc. It is very costly, uses a lot of energy... carbon is cheap and simple and also reduces a host of other contaminants that UV wont reduce.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Frankfort, IL
    Posts
    7

    Brew Water

    Starting a 10bbl production brewery in my Village and using local water. The latest water report is as follows:

    Copper 1.3 ppm
    Chlorine 1.2 ppm

    Haloacetic acids 10.9 ppb
    total Trihalomethances 38 ppb

    Nitrate 0.053 ppm
    Barium 0.132 ppm
    Flouride 0.37 ppm
    Manganese 44.1 ppb
    Sodium 19.1 ppm

    Combined Radium 2.3 pCi/L
    Gross Alpha-excluding radon & uranium 7.8 pCi/L
    Uranium 0.46935 ug/l

    Xylenes 0.00315 ppm

    Is there a carbon filter system that would strip these out and we can re-introduce salts and minerals to taylor brew water? Or is an RO a better solution along with a carbon filter. I have a quote for a water softner, RO and boiler on skid but wondering if a carbon filter system would be sufficient. Your insight and expertise is greatly appreciated.

    Will

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Frankfort, IL
    Posts
    7

    Brew Water

    Starting a 10bbl production brewery in my Village and using local water. The latest water report is as follows:

    Copper 1.3 ppm
    Chlorine 1.2 ppm

    Haloacetic acids 10.9 ppb
    total Trihalomethances 38 ppb

    Nitrate 0.053 ppm
    Barium 0.132 ppm
    Flouride 0.37 ppm
    Manganese 44.1 ppb
    Sodium 19.1 ppm

    Combined Radium 2.3 pCi/L
    Gross Alpha-excluding radon & uranium 7.8 pCi/L
    Uranium 0.46935 ug/l

    Xylenes 0.00315 ppm

    Is there a carbon filter system that would strip these out and we can re-introduce salts and minerals to taylor brew water? Or is an RO a better solution along with a carbon filter. I have a quote for a water softner, RO and boiler on skid but wondering if a carbon filter system would be sufficient. Your insight and expertise is greatly appreciated.

    Will

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