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Thread: Calcite remineralizing cartridge after RO system

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Ca
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    Calcite remineralizing cartridge after RO system

    I'm on a well and there is a lot of sediment that a sediment filter wont filter out so for next 12 months or so I'm stuck using R/O water.
    I had the water tested by Ward and there isn't anything harmful in the finished product.
    I just installed a on-demand water heater with copper piping and I'm worried about RO water sitting in it for an extended period.

    Has anyone used a Calcite re-mineralizing cartrige after RO into a storage tanK?
    If so, did it work?
    I'm thinking about installing one.

    Thanks,
    Brian

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
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    46
    Sure. They work just fine, especially if your RO water pH is below 7. You can split the permeate flow and control it with a needle valve. Run one leg straight to a junction, and run the other leg through the calcite filter. Put a TDS or EC meter after the two legs re-join so you can custom dial in your preferred TDS or EC.

    We just did this very thing on a commercial RO system that fed the cooling jacket on some commercial ovens in a hospital.

    Russ
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    monmouth, IL USA
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    36

    why are you worried about RO water sitting in the tank?

    So why are you worried about RO water sitting in your water heater?

    steve

  4. #4
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    May 2015
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    Ca
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    RO water is void of minerals. From all ive read the RO water will begin to draw minerals from the piping causing pitting.

  5. #5
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    Apr 2013
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    monmouth, IL USA
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    hmmm guess I should look into it. Are you thinking what ever metal the heat exchanger is made of? If all you have used it for is RO water there shouldn't be any mineral deposits.

    s

  6. #6
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    Mar 2014
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    Cincinnati, OH, USA
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    I'm a little confused by this thread...

    but you should have no metal contact with RO water other than Stainless Steel.

    Russ
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    monmouth, IL USA
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    Yes I assume the heat exchanger is SS. I have a call into the manufacturer. From my rudimentary understanding of chemistry I dont see where RO water would be more of a corrosion risk than municipal water and should be less of a mineral risk. I know with high mineral content waters you have to backflush the water heater regularly to flush out the crud that forms when water is heated.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by murmsk View Post
    Yes I assume the heat exchanger is SS. I have a call into the manufacturer. From my rudimentary understanding of chemistry I dont see where RO water would be more of a corrosion risk than municipal water and should be less of a mineral risk. I know with high mineral content waters you have to backflush the water heater regularly to flush out the crud that forms when water is heated.
    RO water absolutely is lower risk for mineral deposition ("scaling") - that's one of the attributes that makes RO water useful. Scaling occurs because minerals (primarily "hardness" - calcium and magnesium) come out of solution. The RO process removes a high percentage of hardness.

    One the other end of the spectrum, very clean water, often referred to "low conductivity water," for example, RO water or DI water, is chemically aggressive. It will even corrode things like copper pipe and brass fittings.

    In post #2 above I describe using calcite to selectively dial in a bit of minerals back into low conductivity water. This approach is used for instance in residential applications where really bad well water requires a whole-house RO. The RO water is too pure however to be routed through the home's copper plumbing system.

    Russ
    Last edited by Buckeye Hydro; 11-01-2017 at 03:56 AM.
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  9. #9
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    Mar 2014
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    Cincinnati, OH, USA
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    Where's that "I like this post" button?
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