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Thread: Logistics of using 1/2 BBL kegs for tax determination

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Wallingford, CT, USA
    Posts
    3

    Logistics of using 1/2 BBL kegs for tax determination

    Hello all.

    Our brewer's notice is in the review process with the TTB, and we intend on using 1/2 BBL sanke kegs as our tax determination tanks. We're a 2 BBL nano brewery, and our lawyer suggested using the kegs for this purpose.

    Quoting the TTB website "Most Common Testing and Measuring Devices Issues":

    Paragraph (b) of § 25.42 provides that beer meters, as established by testing, may not exceed ±0.5 percent variance. If a meter test discloses an error in excess of the allowable variation, the brewer must immediately adjust or repair the meter. Adjustments need to reduce the error as near to zero as practicable.

    How do you calibrate and use kegs?
    Do you use a flow meter and make some mark at the 1/2 BBL point? And if so, do you have to recalibrate this mark every so often? Does the mark you make have to be within ±0.5 percent, if that's even possible, or just the meter itself?
    Do you have to use the flow meter every time you fill the kegs, or only to calibrate them?

    Thanks,
    Dave

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    232
    For filling kegs, why not just use the weight? You have to correct for the specific gravity of the beer you're filling the keg with. Multiply the final gravity by the weight/gallon of water. Example:

    light beer with a FG of 1.008: 8.345 x 1.008 = 8.422 lb/gallon => A keg with a net weight (total - tare) of 131.5 lb is 131.5 / 8.422 = 15.614 gallons

    really big beer with a FG of 1.030: 8.345 x 1.030 = 8.595 lb/gallon => A keg with a net weight (total - tare) of 131.5 lb is 131.5 / 8.595 = 15.300 gallons

    If you permanently mark the tare weight on each keg, you can use the marked value, rather than weighing and recording it. But weighing it empty should give you a good idea of whether the scale has drifted, or the keg is not completely empty.

    Regards,
    Mike Sharp
    Last edited by rdcpro; 04-26-2017 at 12:04 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Wallingford, CT, USA
    Posts
    3
    That's an excellent idea, I wonder if it it'll fly with the TTB.

    Thanks Mike

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Kent, WA
    Posts
    232
    Quote Originally Posted by BrewinDave View Post
    That's an excellent idea, I wonder if it it'll fly with the TTB.

    Thanks Mike
    I'm not an expert in their rules, but it seems like any method with sufficient accuracy should be acceptable. Not everyone uses a flow meter. It's pretty easy to get within 1/2 of one percent with weight. 130 lbs +/- .5 lbs is about 0.4 % and a commercial scale (like the Uline platform scale, for example) is much better...something like 150 lb x .01 lb.

    Mike

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Enumclaw, WA
    Posts
    140
    We weigh our kegs as described above. We figured out pretty quick that our GW Kent Keg filler over fills the kegs so we stopped weighing each one and only weigh the final keg if it's a partial fill.
    We "lose" a little bit of beer with each over fill, but it is worth the savings on the back lifting off the scale onto the dolly.
    Prost!
    Eric Brandjes
    Cole Street Brewery
    Enumclaw, WA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Fargo, ND, USA
    Posts
    17
    I just fill mine. But I use 1/6bbl. When I take one out of the cold room and transfer it to the taproom I tax it out, real simple. $1.167 in tax for each one.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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