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Thread: Help needed Wiring PT100 type sensor with STC Controller

  1. #1
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    Help needed Wiring PT100 type sensor with STC Controller

    Hello guys,

    I have question here and any help will be appreciate.

    I have a couple of PT100 type temperature sensors, (picture below), it has 4 pins to connect the wires but I dont have a schematic of how to wire it. There is marked ground wire on one pin and the numbers 1, 2,3 on another remain three, but I dont know which one I have to use.

    Also I intend to use it with a STC type controller, from what I have searched, most STC`s have temperature sensor input for only two wires and what I have read on specifications it is for NTC type sensor.

    My question is, can I use my sensor with a STC controller? How do I wire it?

    Thanks

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  2. #2
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    If memory serves me correct, the STC-1000 will not accept the RTD type sensors (Pt100, Pt1000). It should tell you the accepted inputs in the PID "manual". I think it only takes a certain type of thermocouple (J, K ect). Don't have my sheet here to look at, but you can probably download one, or it might say on the sticker on top of the controller.

    If you want a cheaper PID controller that is compatible, I'd suggest something like the JLD7100 or XMT7100. They were cheaper than a Fuji and so far mine has performed to the same standard, albeit with a slightly smaller display. There are a number of other options as well from places like GolanderUSA.com depending on the parameters you need.

    You are likely better off getting a new controller over a different temp probe at the RTDs usually work quite well.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by UnFermentable View Post
    If memory serves me correct, the STC-1000 will not accept the RTD type sensors (Pt100, Pt1000). It should tell you the accepted inputs in the PID "manual". I think it only takes a certain type of thermocouple (J, K ect). Don't have my sheet here to look at, but you can probably download one, or it might say on the sticker on top of the controller.

    If you want a cheaper PID controller that is compatible, I'd suggest something like the JLD7100 or XMT7100. They were cheaper than a Fuji and so far mine has performed to the same standard, albeit with a slightly smaller display. There are a number of other options as well from places like GolanderUSA.com depending on the parameters you need.

    You are likely better off getting a new controller over a different temp probe at the RTDs usually work quite well.
    Thanks for your response.

    Yes, initially I was thinking use a PID controller to control a 24V solenoid valve, however I was afraid about the constant switching on/off for the valve as PID keep sending small pulses of signal to maintain the settled temperature, should I worry about that or it is normal for that type of valve to work like that?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JulioGDiana View Post
    Yes, initially I was thinking use a PID controller to control a 24V solenoid valve, however I was afraid about the constant switching on/off for the valve as PID keep sending small pulses of signal to maintain the settled temperature, should I worry about that or it is normal for that type of valve to work like that?
    I am guessing this is for cooling jackets on tanks. PID is the industry standard with most using a Love or Fuji controller. I believe the STC is a 110V 10A controller if memory serves correct, and that has some limitations. I personally believe the higher AC voltage and amperage switching burns out faster (less number of switches before burning out), although I have no actual data to correlate that. A 24DC will offer less amperage (and thus heat) going through the controller by way of a solid state relay. Of course there is cost considerations on all of those details, as well as personal preferences. You can buy the controllers in 110V, 240V, 24V, ect. Get the one that matches your desired solenoid/valve (which can also often come in many configurations). Personal fav is a pneumatic valve with PID controller. Less electricity where its wet.

    You can control the parameters for the PID so that it does not switch off and on constantly. If you give it a wider range of acceptance, then it will not click off and on with a 0.1 degree differential. That will prolong the life of the controller and probably help prevent over/under shooting of the target temperature. If it is for an electric element, it can be better to keep the parameters closer together to maintain accuracy of the desired temp, but often comes at the expense of the life of the controller.

  5. #5
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    Yes, it is to control the temperature on jacket fermenters.
    I dont have the STC and PID yet, just looking with one will better work for me, and I think your advice is right, PID will be a better choice.
    I have the solenoids and the temperature sensors, the solenoids are the 2w-20 type ones with 24V 2A coils, I will start to look for a PID that can send that current without use a SSR, I think they call it PID with relay output.
    Pneumatic of course is a better job, but I got my solenoids as a part of my brewery package, also it is not a big setup, only 5x 4BBL fermenters.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JulioGDiana View Post
    Thanks for your response.

    Yes, initially I was thinking use a PID controller to control a 24V solenoid valve, however I was afraid about the constant switching on/off for the valve as PID keep sending small pulses of signal to maintain the settled temperature, should I worry about that or it is normal for that type of valve to work like that?
    One of the nice things about a PID is that it doesn't switch on/off frequently--that's where the hysteresis and fuzzy logic come in.
    Timm Turrentine

    Brewerywright,
    Terminal Gravity Brewing,
    Enterprise. Oregon.

  7. #7
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    which pins of my sensor should I use?

    PID need 3 but I have 4.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by JulioGDiana View Post
    which pins of my sensor should I use?

    PID need 3 but I have 4.
    https://instrumentationtools.com/dif.../#.WlgpUGLhXYU

    In the link above it explains how you can connect a 4 wire RTD to a 3 or even 2 wire configuration. You loose the benefit of a 4 wire design, but should work just fine for your purposes as a 3 wire.

  9. #9
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    Great, thanks for the link, very good information.

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