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Thread: The speech behind this thread

  1. #1
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    The speech behind this thread

    In her keynote address at the Craft Brewers Conference earlier this month in New Orleans, Kim Jordan laid out an explicit set of objectives for the craft beer industry. Well articulated and inspirational in tone, Jordan suggested specific goals the craft brewing community should strive for to achieve a lasting legacy.

    Read it - then come back here to comment.

  2. #2
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    Co-Op Marketing

    I would suggest that microbrewers seek more exposure by marketing themselves. Small local breweries don’t have the capital nor the fluidity of a national marketing campaign. However as an industry it may be possible. Look at the “Got Milk?” or “Cotton: The Fabric of Our Lives” campaigns. The local brewery could not influence the market price of micro beer but with cooperative marketing it may work. When this is combined with current trends in health food/industrial farming concerns it would be easy to propagate a strong image against the macro brewers.

  3. #3
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    Talking Microbrewers Marketing Co-op

    I've been saying this for years. A campaign like "Got Milk" or the California Cheese/Raisins is probably our best short- to medium-term bet in competing against the vast advertising budgets of the biggest brewers. Together we have an army that the big guys would have real difficulty defending themselves against. Why the Association of Brewers or some other organziation has not stepped up to create such a campaign is baffling to me(???). I note that the threads that started this conversation are years old, yet there has been so little response... Why? Marketing will be the path to our collective success, like it or not... This is not a compromise of our values. The microbrewing industry will not return to impressive growth until we as an industry learn how to make ourselves appeal to the heart and soul of the consumer. There is good reason that the imports have made capital of the microbrewing revolution -- MARKETING!!! MARKETING!!! MARKETING!!!

  4. #4
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    Craft Beer Marketing

    Cooperative marketing is one thing, a catch phrase for the craft industry is inappropriate.
    The milk industry with "got milk?" doesn't speak of the individuality of the craft beer industry. The milk producers aren't making 9 styles of milk. The cotton growers aren't making different cottons. Furthermore, the brewers are serving customers that celebrate individuality.
    Ask yourself, who drinks craft beer? These consumers are spanning demographics, social circles and are both urban and rural. Craft beer drinkers enjoy the difference, the handcraft elements. They are more likely to appreciate fine foods or specialty coffee. They are more likely to support small business and local crafts. These people choose for themselves and typically don't join in the masses.
    We've found cooperative success in marketing craft beer by getting involved. Involved with local events, fundraisers, and recreational activities. Cooperative tasting events and helping educate people about brewing differences. We gain fans of our beers by getting involved with the lifestyles of our customers.
    If there was a craft beer industry slogan, it would need to address the individuality of the craft drinker. An industry-wide campaign might backfire because our consumers enjoy the small differences. A different approach, something like an artists' guild, that celebrates the difference and handcrafting of beer would connect with our buyers better.
    celebrate the moment,
    Neal Jones

  5. #5
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    Re: Craft Beer Marketing

    Originally posted by SierraBlanca
    Cooperative marketing is one thing, a catch phrase for the craft industry is inappropriate.
    The milk industry with "got milk?" doesn't speak of the individuality of the craft beer industry.
    Why not? How about "Want choice?"

    Cheers!
    --Neil

  6. #6
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    Phrase that....?

    I like the idea of choice for microbrews. "Got Choice?" doesn't say craft beer and its an obvious rip off of milk's.
    Great slogans are tough to create. I've always liked "Because so much is riding on your tires".
    Microbrews, because real people choose real beers
    celebrate the moment,
    Neal Jones

  7. #7
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    Mukilteo, WA
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    How about..........

    Microbrews, fermenting change in tastes.

  8. #8
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    Infants and invalids prefer bland foods. Perhaps you'd prefer a craft brew?

    Paul Philippon
    The Duck-Rabbit Craft Brewery
    Farmville NC
    www.duckrabbitbrewery.com

  9. #9
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    Durango
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    Maybe, if we try, we can get this post to have 1000 views with less than 10 responses. Who is with me?

    Cheers
    Bottoms Up!

  10. #10
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    Why not just combine slogans.

    "Got Beer, its not just for breakfast anymore, just do it"

  11. #11
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    Feb 2003
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    Seriously....

    Kim has a good point about co-operation. I have worked with a variety of associations including several dairy and ag (Fruit, Wine etc.)Councils. If state and national brewing guilds/associations could organize the way these guys do, most of the money for marketing would be provided by the government. For this to happen, a few things need to be in place. (My opinion)

    A concise, forward looking strategy must be adopted by the member companies. (10% Marketshare worldwide/Export plan etc.)

    The association must distance itself from the product and emphasize the mainstream aspects of the industry (jobs, local and national economic growth, environmental stewardship, ties to agriculture (subsidized) industry. I realize some people might be having a fit after reading the distancing from the product part, but dealing with the government is much easier when you are taking about the things they care about (money, jobs, publicity). The quality of your beer is (IMO) irrelevant to most bureaucrats.

    To be honest, I think the industry is old enough to start thinking big and long-term. What is the plan to get to 10% marketshare? What export opportunities exist, and what goverment resources (advice, grants, marketing money) are availible to make it happen? Why aren't these issues being addressed by the national associations (or are they)?


    Just some thoughts

  12. #12
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    Carrizozo, NM
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    Power behind the collective

    The strength in numbers will sway those in power, always. A marketing slogan might do nothing more than confirm the preference of existing craft beer drinkers.
    When I market the beers we make, I use everything I can find. The latest, the doubling of growth in the craft segment from 2003 to 2004. I use the strength of the economic impact on the state's economy and show how smart it is to support the local brewery. I take the reverse, Bud's 7% drop and their desperate grasp at misinformation with low carb beer.
    We use our success to promote our distributor's. Because without those guys, we would be forgotten. We show the retailers how our distributor recognizes the REAL growth in the beer industry, the local breweries.
    An industry cooperative should use more than the product to promote the collective. The strength of economic, ecologic, and community stewardship will sway the politicians. Promoting yourself as part of the community is always good. What kind of local events do you sponsor? What charaties do you donate to? Do you hire the poor or the disabled? Do you donate your spent mash to local ranchers? The little things gain support, everytime.
    We haven't gained the share of the domestic market yet. That plan is first, or even the share of the state's market place.
    I suggest looking at the immediate local market first, then the broader market you distribute to. The numbers are there, craft beers are growing. Let's work together to lower our costs and keep the quality high. We'll use the savings to market the broader positives.
    celebrate the moment,
    Neal Jones

  13. #13
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    ?
    - more later
    Last edited by matt; 03-02-2005 at 07:35 AM.

  14. #14
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    fairbanks, AK
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    real beer, real taste, real good!
    (this is something actually said to me!) "If your beer was any better than budwieser, they would be making it."

  15. #15
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    Sorry,
    My first response was "?" , Then I had to go back and read the original post from the adimistrator and the Reference to Kim Jordans' quoted comments.

    Now,

    I think the comments so far are putting the "cart before the horse".

    I think, and correct me otherwise, that Ms. Jordan was looking first, continue to Enjoy our careers(love beer and love making it) but, then start an internal oversite of the industry, formal or otherwise, so as to, as an industry, form a standard the public buying your product can expect from thier purchase. ( consistant, quality). Then you can look at "logos" for the industry.(vision)

    This is a broard response and does not include all comments on Ms. Jordans' "Enduring and Endearing" points....maybe later.

    I would be interested in Ms. Jordan's Comments now, after almost two years (from the date I saw)since her "Key Note Address" and see what she thinks the "industry" has accomplisished, or not, towards her goals.


    Final thoughts for the day;

    Craft breweries have 3%of the market but maybe 3% of the Craft breweries have 97% of the 3 %.

    Opputunities don't arise, they are made.

    "Create a strateogy for it ahead of time, rather let it happen by chance" Kim Jordan

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