Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 19

Thread: Shipping wort for a chain of brewpubs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    6

    Shipping wort for a chain of brewpubs

    Hypothetically, say someone owns a chain of 15 "brewpubs" throughout 4 states. The "brewpubs" only have fermentation tanks in them to place the shipped wort into. The wort is produced in a seperate brewery. How would you guys go about shipping this wort? How would you keep it from becoming infected?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    676
    I believe this is how Granite City does it. I also think they have patented this process so you might want to check on the legality of infringing on their patent.

    http://www.gcfb.net/history.cfm
    Linus Hall
    Yazoo Brewing
    Nashville, TN
    [url]www.yazoobrew.com[/url]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by lhall
    I believe this is how Granite City does it. I also think they have patented this process so you might want to check on the legality of infringing on their patent.

    http://www.gcfb.net/history.cfm

    I downloaded some of GC's investment statements and they loosely talked about their patented "Fermentus Interruptus" system. I can understand their mechanical systems being patented, but it seems high doubtful that the actual "idea" of off-site wort brewing and shipping to seperately located fermentation tanks being patented can be patented.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    185
    just because I found this interesting, too...

    US Patent # 7,214,402

    http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-P...&RS=PN/7214402

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by jarviw
    just because I found this interesting, too...

    US Patent # 7,214,402

    http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-P...&RS=PN/7214402
    Thanks for that very helpful link. It looks like the actual "shipping wort" process is patented. I had absolutely no clue that an "action" could be patented.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    185
    it's considered a "process", a process that they have patented for.

    although, other than their point in the complications of "shipping beer in intrastate/interstate commerce", I am still sitting here wondering, is it really worth it?

    yes, they saved the hassle of buying hot side equipments and hiring talented brewers. but how is this making them a "brew pub?" (a "cellar pub" maybe?)

    besides, wouldn't you need to have a brewery license for each location anyways?



    (hey, I have an idea.... how about we ferment the wort in the truck, and just pump out to the pub for lagering? that way we can be "brewing" beer in whatever state that has cheaper tax.)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Point Pleasant Beach, NJ, USA
    Posts
    65
    Why not just use extract? Isn't there a company that makes extract pub systems?

    Tom

    ECBC

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Reno, Nevada USA
    Posts
    324

    Thumbs up

    I may be missing something regarding this. Why not ship kegged, finished product and transfer to serving tank? Is there a law still in the books that require Tap House/ Breweries to produce 20-30 Bbls per year if they do not have functional breweries in-house. That is actual fermentation on premise. BJ's just built a 50bbl brewery here in Reno to ship product to other BJ's locations that do not have breweries in-house. This is a very interesting post, look forward to reading.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by nohandslance
    I may be missing something regarding this. Why not ship kegged, finished product and transfer to serving tank? Is there a law still in the books that require Tap House/ Breweries to produce 20-30 Bbls per year if they do not have functional breweries in-house. That is actual fermentation on premise. BJ's just built a 50bbl brewery here in Reno to ship product to other BJ's locations that do not have breweries in-house. This is a very interesting post, look forward to reading.

    From what I've gathered in my research, the different liquor laws in each state could make transporting actual fermented beer across state lines illegal. This is the reason for the shipping of wort.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    West Chester, PA
    Posts
    393
    FYI that patent is nearly un-enforceable....just change one thing and you'll run. I doubt the patent owner will "vigerously defend" their patent.

    why would you do this anyway???? same weight to ship finished beer....
    Larry Horwitz

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Horwitz
    FYI that patent is nearly un-enforceable....just change one thing and you'll run. I doubt the patent owner will "vigerously defend" their patent.

    why would you do this anyway???? same weight to ship finished beer....
    Refer to post right above yours.

    In my no-legal-background opinion, I agree with you on the patent issue as well.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Syracuse NY USA
    Posts
    182
    I agree. Just open a beer bar. Sell craft beer. That kind of situation sounds like it would be a major pain.
    Tim Butler

    Empire Brewing Co.
    Syracuse, NY

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Palau
    Posts
    1,593
    I have been to breweries that do this in Australia, and my good pal Boris of Spain was brewmaster at a wort production facility that produced wort for a whole chain of brewpubs there as well. This idea is in no way novel--it's essentially a long knockout hose--and it's been done many times before. I don't think it could be defensibly patented any more than selling frozen bread dough (also "fermentis interruptis"). Why would anyone do this? To have shiny tanks in a "brewpub" atmosphere without having the expense of brewhouse equipment/utilities/redundant inventories/full time brewer/etc/etc/etc. Same as many restaurants do by baking bread from store-bought dough.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada!
    Posts
    281
    OK, so for a different view:
    If you're set on shipping wort from one central facility and fermenting it in different locations, why not do some high gravity brewing, acidify the wort, then dilute and drop the wort down in pH with some water and pH adjustments on the other end.

    It's basically what the Brewhouse kits do for homebrewers, except on a larger scale.

    I won't pass judgement, it's just another method.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Solana Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    58

    Truck

    In europe I used to pump beer from a truck and fill so called "Beer Drive" tanks. Horizontal 5 and 10 HL tanks lined with plastic liner bags.
    Some breweries even fill these tanks at the brewery and then ship them out to different pubs etc....
    One time I forgot to close the CIP return manifold at the Spendrups brewery when pumping beer into the trucks and "spilled" about 400 HL of beer!!
    The brewmaster was kind of upset.....:-)

    David Meadows
    Technobrew
    San Diego, CA

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •