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IAW
07-08-2009, 05:02 AM
I am struggling with the style of beer that I want to make as our year-round entry level/gateway beer for our start up in North east Florida. This beer will be canned and marketed as the beer to be enjoyed outside (beach, river, pools and around the grill).

I want it to be a crisp and flavorful light beer and also a solid introduction to craft beers. I have thought about doing a lager or a kolsch but I fear they will be to capital intensive for us starting out.

Basically I want to make a beer that can be priced where new craft beer drinkers are not afraid to experiment but it also has the flavor and quality that long time craft beer drinkers would want to drink it (session beer) and appreciate it for what it is.

Any thoughts?

We will also be brewing a Wit, a Pale Ale, Belgian Amber,an IPA, and a Strong Belgian Golden

beerking1
07-08-2009, 05:49 AM
I have brewed a test batch for the brewpub I will be brewing at (installation starts this Sunday!! :D ) of an American Wheat that I think will be our gateway/flagship beer. I used the CA 2/Liberty yeast, which gave a bit more character than 1056 would.

gabewilson50
07-08-2009, 06:26 AM
Personally, I could drink an imperial stout on the beach but I know that the grand majority of people don't even consider darker beers when it's hot & humid out. They look for something that replaces the water they should be drinking. For what you are looking for, I would go with a blonde ale (semi-kolsch) that may take a couple of days longer to ferment, but that doesn't need the lagering time to produce a crisp, clean flavor. Find a yeast that doesn't have problems fermenting at 60-65 deg F.

einhorn
07-08-2009, 07:37 AM
A lower gravity Bavarian style hefeweizen (12P) should fit the bill quite nicely in the Sunshine State, no?

IAW
07-08-2009, 07:57 AM
A lower gravity Bavarian style hefeweizen (12P) should fit the bill quite nicely in the Sunshine State, no?

I totally agree
We plan on making a Belgian Wit and many seasonal wheat beers but unfortunately Wheat beers down here are still viewed as "girly" which we hope to change

liammckenna
07-08-2009, 09:17 AM
Ditto on the American Wheat.

30% malted wheat, 16-18 IBU's. Will offend no one, but let people join your club and be happy to wear the t-shirt.

Suggest safale 04 with a high To fermentation.

Pax.

Liam

beerking1
07-08-2009, 12:47 PM
For my American Wheat, I changed things up a little to make it more interesting without being "threatening." I went with Hallertauer, and put in a pretty big charge of flavor hops, without much bittering hops (don't have the numbers with me right now). The test batch has been going over VERY well. Gives it a bit more character than a typical American Wheat.

Woolsocks
07-09-2009, 07:16 AM
I'd also consider Kolsch. It can almost pass for light lager but is more interesting, and I don't think you need to invest in lagering tanks to get a good Kolsch (ours goes from grain to glass in 2 weeks).

imakewort
07-09-2009, 11:42 AM
i second the american wheat. either "california" yeasts.

a nice little twist would be some to add some lemon or orange zest to the whirlpool. perfect for florida!

what area you trying to open in? so i can stop by on my next trip down there.

IAW
07-09-2009, 01:09 PM
i second the american wheat. either "california" yeasts.

a nice little twist would be some to add some lemon or orange zest to the whirlpool. perfect for florida!

what area you trying to open in? so i can stop by on my next trip down there.

We will be opening in Jacksonville, in the Riverside/Avondale area. Hope to be producing/selling beer by the end of the year (fingers crossed!)

einhorn
07-10-2009, 09:38 AM
I personally think that if you do a Bavarian style without fruit, you may be able to differentiate this style from Widmer, Blue Moon & Co.

You could even do a combo and serve it with a shot of Jägermeister and call it the "Gentleman's Special"...

NickHorne
07-14-2009, 02:00 PM
I'd consider a Shwartzbier or Low Gravity (3.5%) English Bitters. Both have a malt profile that would accompany your other beers well. I'd think Wheat beer would be more of a Transition beer, however the above are too often underestimated.

If you market the Swatrzbier right (IE: getting over the color) It could be a hit. I don't think anybody has tried to market one yet. We are due!

drewseslu
07-15-2009, 03:43 PM
Both of my 'Crossover' beers have faired very well, unfortunately they both require a cereal mash (using some local grain). The Witbier and Pre-prohibition style cream ale (sold as Belgian White and Golden Ale, respectively.
However, the Dubbel has enchanted many wine and cocktail drinkers who have passed through our doors...