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goodnaturebrew
04-06-2011, 01:55 PM
Hi All,

For many this is probably a dumb question, but you have to start somewhere I guess. I have 4 - 2BBl Jacketed fermenters for a small nanobrewery and I am trying to figure out cold crashing/cooling them. They will all be in temp controlled room for fermentation, but not sure how to set them up for cooling. I am interested in using one of Micromatics small power packs for glycol, but can you set them up to cool multiple vessels? Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.

~Matt

jimvgjr
04-06-2011, 02:33 PM
You will be limited in flow, but with that small of fermenters you should be able to control temp and crash cool. Your best bet is contacting micromatic and talking to their applications people- I've seen these used in many nano breweries.

Good luck!

Jim
Pro Refrigeration Inc.

goodnaturebrew
04-07-2011, 04:49 AM
You will be limited in flow, but with that small of fermenters you should be able to control temp and crash cool. Your best bet is contacting micromatic and talking to their applications people- I've seen these used in many nano breweries.

Good luck!

Jim
Pro Refrigeration Inc.
Hey Jim,

Thanks for the quick reply. I did contact them and I am waiting for a tech guy to get back to me. I spoke with a sales rep and of course he just wanted to sell me the thing. I am also unsure of how the hookups go on the fermenters are there any good schematics on how should run the lines? Should each vessel have its own continuous flow or can it run through the all the fermenters. Anyways I appreciate the help!

Thanks again
~Matt

~Matt

william.heinric
04-07-2011, 05:31 AM
This is a rough description of the glycol loops I've seen.

When you plumb the system, you will have a loop that runs out from the glycol reservoir, past the FVs, and back to the chiller. From there, you will run lines from the loop to the FVs. This will allow you to keep the loop running continuously, which means you can independently crash your vessels instead of crashing all or none if they inline in the loop.

I'm not sure about the design of your tanks, but there should be an IN and and OUT for each jacket that forces the glycol in on the high side of the jacket and draws it out on the bottom side. These are just the basics, as flow rate and cooling capacity are important, but there you go.

Bill

goodnaturebrew
04-07-2011, 07:15 AM
Thanks Bill!!

After doing some more research and talking to the engineer who designed my FVs I have come to the same conclusion. Run a continuous loop with an in and out for each FV off of the loop. I will have to work on designing the loop now. Anyone know what the story is on Sharkbites (Quick connect Compression fittings for plumbing) with Glycol? I will run all copper for the glycol, but wondering if I can avoid welding. I know that sharkbites have some plastic pieces, but man are they a breeze to work with.

Thanks again Bill.
~Matt

schmogger
04-07-2011, 08:21 AM
This is a rough description of the glycol loops I've seen.

When you plumb the system, you will have a loop that runs out from the glycol reservoir, past the FVs, and back to the chiller. From there, you will run lines from the loop to the FVs. This will allow you to keep the loop running continuously, which means you can independently crash your vessels instead of crashing all or none if they inline in the loop.

I'm not sure about the design of your tanks, but there should be an IN and and OUT for each jacket that forces the glycol in on the high side of the jacket and draws it out on the bottom side. These are just the basics, as flow rate and cooling capacity are important, but there you go.

Bill



Hey Bill, shouldn't the glycol be going in the bottom ports and out the upper ports!?

goodnaturebrew
04-07-2011, 08:26 AM
Hey Bill, shouldn't the glycol be going in the bottom ports and out the upper ports!?

Schmogger,

According to pro refrigeration's schematics (http://www.prochiller.com/files/AllAboutGlycol.pdf) you are correct. I love this site. Everyone is so helpful.