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View Full Version : Rye in 20 bbl single step, rakeless tun



ScottM84
09-09-2012, 08:40 AM
I am about to brew a rye beer in aforementioned 20Bbl rakeless tun. I want to figure out how much rye I can fit in the grist without sticking the mash. Twenty barrels is a pretty large tun not to have mechanical rakes, but I've gotten pretty good at suspending the grain reasonably well. I've read varying advice on using rice hulls and how much rye can fit without gumming up.

I want to do a hoppy rye ale with around 30% rye in the grist. Briess says to use rice hulls once you approach 20% and beta-glucanase extract at around 35%, but it also mentions something about rye malt is effective (DP? beta-glucanase?) in a single step infusion mash up to 20%. I really want to do around 30% grist (even 35%) but my boss thinks I'm crazy. This is a one-off so I can't really experiment as Briess and others have suggested. Does anyone with a similar system have any advice?

Cheers,

Scott Miller
The Duck-Rabbit Craft Brewery

brewmaster 2011
09-09-2012, 12:12 PM
we did a 10 bbl rye dopplebock and with i believe was 165lbs rye and added 50 lbs rice hulls to the mash single infusion at 153 f and had a 90 min run off no trouble.

Ted Briggs
09-10-2012, 07:06 AM
I do alot of rye beers and 30% rye with rice hulls should be no problem. I use 10% hulls/weight of rye. A protien rest would help too. Dont try a traditional Roggen, 50-60% rye, unless you have a step mash and rakes/knives. Id avoid enzymes unless absolutly necessary.

Kushal
09-10-2012, 11:09 AM
I did a 15 bbl mash with around 1500 LB of grist, ~30% Rye.

The first time we did this we added rice hulls directly into the mash tun - major mistake! the hulls basically got pushed and floated over to the edges of the mash tun and we ended up with a doughball in the middle and a very hull heavy area around the sides.

Now we just mix the rice hulls in as we run through the mill, no problems. About 50# worth in that mash. Runs off at the same rate as our all barley beers of the same gravity.