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View Full Version : We'd like to hear your lessons learnt... Planning to set up a Stout 3BBL System



GallowsHillBrew
06-16-2014, 04:21 AM
For all practical purposes we have made our minds up regarding the system we are going for... The plan is to run the following:
Custom Hot Liquor Tank - more than double the standard Stout version to allow multiple batches and running our small pilot system from the same hot water source
Stout Insulated Mash Tun
Stout Insulated Domed Kettle with condensation stack
Possibly we'll get the new hop back / grant combo vessel
The electrical, heating & control items will be manufactured locally

What we would like to know is the lessons learnt by others to run a Stout system.

How are your vessels configured?
What hose configuration are you using?
Which pumps?
What chiller size?
Any tips and tricks you are willing to share?

Thanks in advance
Schalk



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515Dave
06-16-2014, 07:25 AM
For all practical purposes we have made our minds up regarding the system we are going for... The plan is to run the following:
Custom Hot Liquor Tank - more than double the standard Stout version to allow multiple batches and running our small pilot system from the same hot water source
Stout Insulated Mash Tun
Stout Insulated Domed Kettle with condensation stack
Possibly we'll get the new hop back / grant combo vessel
The electrical, heating & control items will be manufactured locally

What we would like to know is the lessons learnt by others to run a Stout system.

How are your vessels configured?
What hose configuration are you using?
Which pumps?
What chiller size?
Any tips and tricks you are willing to share?

Thanks in advance
Schalk



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

We have one that's a few years old now. It's functional. We have to use hop bags for most of our beers, and that's a pain in the butt. I would not recommend direct firing it, though it does work and I know people who have (and we did for the better part of a year).

The old design for the flat boil kettle lid was essentially worthless, and we almost never have it on the kettle except during the initial mash-out to boil to help keep heat in. You can't possibly use it to CIP without chemicals spraying all over the brewery. I understand that design flaw has been "fixed", but we didn't get that fix, so we end up using the lid for the mash tun for CIP for both the kettle and the mash tun, but it doesn't seal especially well on either of those. The dome top design looks better, but I have no experience with it, so can't really comment directly on that.

Tangential inlet works ok, but the electric elements interfere with the whirlpool action a little (not to mention hop bags if we have them in there), and it's really not very sturdily made. It probably should be braced to hold the weight of a valve or two and some brewery hose filled with however much wort ends up in it, but it's just kinda hanging out there on it's own. We will have a brewday disaster at some point when that thing breaks off.

Be sure to clean the crap out of the electric elements. You absolutely do not want to leave trub or proteins or hop material on your elements. I recommend adding an oxidative cleaner (for instance, Leracept-O) to your caustic. It works wonders. Absent that, you'll need to scrub scrub scrub.

The Hot Liquor tank had a leaky weld on it the first time we filled it with water. Stout worked with us to get that welded up by a local shop, though, and it's been fine ever since. Good call on getting a bigger HLT, though. That's one of the bigger bottlenecks on brewday if you're looking to double batch.

I have very limited experience with their fermenters, but the ones I saw, well, let's just say I would get something else.

Overall, it's a functional system, but just. It's basically "you get what you pay for", IMO. Our next brewhouse will definitely not be Stout, but you can make good beer on it if you're patient and willing to make compromises with your process.

Our pump (3/4 horse I think) and (28 I think?) plate and frame chiller are from CPE systems, and are great. Highly recommend these guys. Don and those guys up there are great to work with, responsive, and super helpful. We have a second 3/4 horse pump we use mostly for pumping sparge water and for CIP that we scored on E-Bay, that we threw a VFD on and it works perfect for that.

We have goodyear hoses and those seem to work just fine. I like handling the 1" ID ones a lot better than the 1 1/2" ID, but we couldn't get the 1 1/2" ID ones with the formed ends, which are much more sanitary, IMO, so we generally use the 1 1/2" ID on the cold side (or on anything that will not get up to pasteurization temp). There's a lot of hose wrangling on a brewday.

Best of luck!

Cheers,

Dave

GallowsHillBrew
06-21-2014, 12:07 PM
Thanks for the feedback Dave


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StonesThrow
06-21-2014, 03:53 PM
hey 515Dave,

I'm interested in why you use hop bags, what problems have you had? We have a 3BBL Stout system (direct fire, not electric) and just dump the hops in freely. I haven't had any issue thus far. We're just shy of a year in. I will agree that the flat kettle lid is pretty much worthless.

Also, what did you not like about the fermenters? We have four 3BBL, with two 6BBL on the way. I've been happy with their performance. I could, however, just be simply ignorant to what I'm missing. I'm just trying to understand my system as well as I possibly can.

NatchezBrew
06-22-2014, 06:26 AM
@gallow,

What size HLT are you guys having built?

GallowsHillBrew
06-23-2014, 12:55 AM
@NatchezBrew

We are planning to have a 1000L tank built with the necessary float switches and timers to ensure the water is at the correct temperature when we want to dough in 1st thing on a brew day.
As base we will use a Floating Dome wine fermenter vessel. (www.fratellimarchisio.com - Flat Bottom Air Sealed Variable Capacity Tank) This will be modified to have all the correct ports and insulation. These are easily available in SA and the quality is good enough for an HLT.


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StoutTanks
07-03-2014, 09:55 AM
Hi Gallows Hill,

Please know that Stout Tanks has made a variety of design improvements since 515Dave received their system several years ago. We incorporate customer feedback and use that for ongoing product improvements.

Regarding the tangential inlet, we've shipped over a thousand brew kettles of various sizes without a single failure of this part. That said, we'll take a look at this and see if there is something we should do going forward.

We started offering the dome top kettle which is an improvement over the flat lid design, plus we've made design improvements on the more cost effective flat lid design. I think 515Dave's concern is that liquid can spray out of the hinge area during CIP - we've added a flap of material to help prevent that. It may also be necessary to throttle down your pump to avoid this.

We've made some significant design changes to the jacketed fermenters as well. You can see the photos below.

Cheers,

John/Stout Tanks and Kettles

177291774017741

populuxe
07-03-2014, 11:25 AM
We've been running a 1.5bbl Mash/Boil kettle from Stout for a little over a year now. We've got a little under 200 brews on it. It's direct fired with blichmann burners running off propane cans. We run silicone tubing to a march pump for transfers. The HLT is just a 200 quart pot we bought on Amazon. It's a simple, straight forward nano brew set-up.

Some things to note regarding the kettles we bought from Stout:

We never use the tangential inlet on the Boil. Trub and hops get pulled in and pulverized in the pump and everything just takes longer to settle out. We just use a big spoon to spin the wort and whirlpool.

The sight "glass" we got with the boil kettle was a plastic tube. Maybe that would work with a different burner/brew stand setup, but ours started to melt and leak on the second or third brew. I took it over to the local neon sign place and they cut me a glass tube to replace it.

Other than that we've been pretty happy. A few dents and scratches, but otherwise they continue to function nicely.

StoutTanks
07-03-2014, 11:37 AM
Hi Populuxe,

We had a bad lot of sight glass tubing, which did shrink - as a result, we've switched to glass. If any others give you trouble, just let us know and we'll take care of it.

Cheers,

John/Stout Tanks and Kettles

GallowsHillBrew
07-03-2014, 12:00 PM
Hi John,
Thanks for the feedback. We will most definitely go with the domed kettle.
Had a look at the one recently shipped to South Africa last weekend... I am a bit skeptical about getting a good fit / seal on the kettle manway.
Overall the equipment looks top notch :-)


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NigeltheBold
07-09-2014, 01:23 PM
Make sure you're getting a big enough mash tun! We bought our system through Brewmation and Stout last year, RIGHT before Stout made the design changes :(. I wish we had waited a few months before ordering, but we had no idea that they were about to make major improvements.

Anyway, our mash tun holds 120 gallons of water. I wish it was bigger, because we can only get about 300 pounds of grain in there with the water. Any more than that, and it's very hard to stir and it's close to overflowing. With about 71% efficiency (which is the most we get with the Brewmation setup), the strongest beer we can make is around 7%. That really sucks, because people are really getting into "big" beers these days. So we basically bought a mash tun that isn't big enough.

Also, the false bottom in the mash tun tends to let grain get in underneath, causing our RIMS system to clog. If it sealed/seated better on the bottom of the mash tun, we wouldn't have that problem. Another brewery in our area that bought basically the same system as I did had the same problem.

BingBrew
07-09-2014, 11:19 PM
We have done all of two brews on our 2BBL setup. I haven't seen direct fire in operation, but I completely support electric on these full-feature vessels. I'm running two 5,500W elements in the HLT and BK and it's doing fine... I spec'd it with a port for 3 elements based on theoretical heat times, but don't see us using it. The HLT seems to gain about a degree a minute and the boil is more in the 1/2 hour range? I'm rocking a strong rolling boil at 95% power, tops. If (when) I boil over, it will be simple inattentiveness because it is gentle to come to boil and shuts down immediately when you cut power. Can you tell I'm pleased w/ the electric?

The flat (leaking) lid on the BK is only more sad now that I see they have such a nice domed solution. I'm totally stealing the idea of using the MT lid for CIP.

I'm using 1/2" silicone tubing w/ 3/4" triclamp barbs and two SS Chugger pumps. The silicone holds up so far and doesn't implode under suction, but that is probably because the pumps are so meager. I've put the pumps in series when chilling to boost power, but it just can't get a whirlpool going. This coupled w/ a 12' counterflow chiller (only reasonable SS one I saw) leads to painful chill times. Process and equipment improvements will follow.

I have the HERMS coil option and in the end am glad I do. Maybe it's just me, but my mash seemed to drop temp quickly when I recirculated alone. I can't blame the vessels because they hold the temp with water for a surprisingly long time. With the HERMS in play I can maintain temp and (gradually) ramp it up. Unfortunately the temp really only goes up when the elements are on (right below the coil). This leads to less of a "step mash" and more of a "mash curve" that I just need to dial in w/ experience.

In summary, I'm still figuring out my routine and I have some pump / chiller pain - but the brewhouse is great. It is nice having such professional features on a nano system. And at the end of the day, my numbers say I'm getting efficiencies in the low 90's and I'm OK with that...

Brandjes
07-10-2014, 12:53 PM
22 double batches on my 2bbl Gas Fired Stout system. Just finished a DIPA at 8.9%. I think I have room in the MT to get another .5% or so. This is at 85-86% efficiency. Only mod I have made is to add high temp exhaust manifold insulation to the bottom knock out port on the kettle. Good support from the folks at Stout. 4bbl Ferms and BT have been issue free. 3/4 hp pump from CPE and 1/2" brewers hose and I get a great whirlpool. Duda Diesel plate chiller 2 sq.m surface chills to 70 at 4 gal/min.


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stbenjamin
07-18-2014, 08:28 AM
We've been using a Stouts kettle for about 2 months, ours is direct fire. We just switched away from hop bags and have been letting the hops float freely. The whirlpool works ok, but we are going to have a dam welded in because way too many hops were getting into our chiller and clogging it. Until then we are using the mash tun to filter the wort.

One big issue we have is hops falling into the center inlet and scorching, which is getting into some of the beer. We don't have a solution for this yet but would appreciate any feedback from anyone with a 3bbl Stouts kettle that is direct fire. Our was purchased 3 years ago then ended up in storage so it is one of the first designs.

Brandjes
07-18-2014, 09:46 AM
I had the same issue with scorching in the bottom knock out tube. I have 2 burners that sit at about 10 and 2 (knock out tube at 6) but it was still to much heat for the tube so I wrapped the tube in high temp exhaust wrap. I still get a tiny bit of scorched material at the point where the tube is welded to the bottom of the kettle because the wrap doesn't cover that area - but I haven't had any issues with it affecting whirlpool or releasing into the beer.

StoutTanks
07-18-2014, 09:49 AM
Hi St. Benjamin,

There are two things to do to avoid scorching wort on a direct fire brew kettle with a center clean out pipe. The first is to be sure your burners are not putting heat directly onto that center pipe (or are not too close to it). The other thing you might consider is wrapping that pipe with insulation (e.g., rock wool insulation or similar) if you are still seeing issues. Another measure would be to actively recirculate the wort while boiling, using the tangential inlet and the center cleanout pipe. I don't think this likely to be necessary in most situations.

We have another customer brewing with a direct fire system and whole hops, and they put a false bottom in the brew kettle to keep them out of the wort chiller. They have reported good results - they did not want to use hop bags any more.

Cheers,

John/Stout Tanks and Kettles

stbenjamin
07-18-2014, 04:45 PM
That sounds like a good solution and better than my idea of welding a plate over the tube to act as a heat shield. Did you just get the wrap at an auto parts store or somewhere online?

stbenjamin
07-18-2014, 04:52 PM
John,

I'll check and see what area our burners are hitting, but since the diameter of that tank is sort of small I don't see how that port won't get hit or be near some pretty intense flames.

515Dave
07-22-2014, 01:32 PM
hey 515Dave,

I'm interested in why you use hop bags, what problems have you had? We have a 3BBL Stout system (direct fire, not electric) and just dump the hops in freely. I haven't had any issue thus far. We're just shy of a year in. I will agree that the flat kettle lid is pretty much worthless.

Also, what did you not like about the fermenters? We have four 3BBL, with two 6BBL on the way. I've been happy with their performance. I could, however, just be simply ignorant to what I'm missing. I'm just trying to understand my system as well as I possibly can.

Sorry just getting back to this now. First off, as John said above, remember that both my system and the ones I saw are several years old at this point and I'm sure there have been a variety of improvements made to them. So this is just my experience, and may not be representative of what you actually would see in practice from a new system.

We have to use them on most of our beers because the bottom outlets aren't positioned in a way that allows the trub (and spent hops) pile to gather far enough away from the side outlet, so the side outlet ends up sucking up a bunch of hop material and trub. Enough to plug the HX originally. On lightly hopped beers we can get away without them, but on our more heavily hopped beers, it would be totally unworkable to not use hop bags, which also has the negative drawback of making the whirlpool less effective (though that's also partially because of the elements in the way).

Ideally, for us, the outlet would be quite a ways further out from the center of the kettle to allow a larger/wider trub pile to form after whirlpooling.

We have also had issues with the mash tun geometry for wheat beers, which we overcome by throwing in rice hulls, and the bottom screen doesn't seal very well, so we generally end up with some grain getting into the boil, even after an extended vourlauf, which is pretty irritating as well.

As for the fermenters - the lids don't seal (they don't seal worth a damn on our kettle, mash tun or HLT either..always leaking during CIP. I think this is a clamping pressure issue more than anything, as some clamps on the lid are tighter than others and it makes the seal clamped under uneven pressure) and krausen was shooting out of them like something out of willy wonka.

Overall, like I said, it's workable, and I'd personally rather be running these than something from psychobrew or a Frankenstein system someone built out of random tank parts, but the setup we have has enough annoyances to make it somewhat irritating to brew on, though it is MUCH better electric than it was with gas.

StonesThrow
07-23-2014, 07:12 AM
Sorry just getting back to this now. First off, as John said above, remember that both my system and the ones I saw are several years old at this point and I'm sure there have been a variety of improvements made to them. So this is just my experience, and may not be representative of what you actually would see in practice from a new system.

We have to use them on most of our beers because the bottom outlets aren't positioned in a way that allows the trub (and spent hops) pile to gather far enough away from the side outlet, so the side outlet ends up sucking up a bunch of hop material and trub. Enough to plug the HX originally. On lightly hopped beers we can get away without them, but on our more heavily hopped beers, it would be totally unworkable to not use hop bags, which also has the negative drawback of making the whirlpool less effective (though that's also partially because of the elements in the way).

Ideally, for us, the outlet would be quite a ways further out from the center of the kettle to allow a larger/wider trub pile to form after whirlpooling.

We have also had issues with the mash tun geometry for wheat beers, which we overcome by throwing in rice hulls, and the bottom screen doesn't seal very well, so we generally end up with some grain getting into the boil, even after an extended vourlauf, which is pretty irritating as well.

As for the fermenters - the lids don't seal (they don't seal worth a damn on our kettle, mash tun or HLT either..always leaking during CIP. I think this is a clamping pressure issue more than anything, as some clamps on the lid are tighter than others and it makes the seal clamped under uneven pressure) and krausen was shooting out of them like something out of willy wonka.

Overall, like I said, it's workable, and I'd personally rather be running these than something from psychobrew or a Frankenstein system someone built out of random tank parts, but the setup we have has enough annoyances to make it somewhat irritating to brew on, though it is MUCH better electric than it was with gas.



Thanks Dave! Yeah, it sounds like they've fixed those problems on the equipment we've got, as we have none of those problems. I've even got the direct fire version. Thanks for the reply!

stbenjamin
07-24-2014, 08:25 AM
I had the same issue with scorching in the bottom knock out tube. I have 2 burners that sit at about 10 and 2 (knock out tube at 6) but it was still to much heat for the tube so I wrapped the tube in high temp exhaust wrap. I still get a tiny bit of scorched material at the point where the tube is welded to the bottom of the kettle because the wrap doesn't cover that area - but I haven't had any issues with it affecting whirlpool or releasing into the beer.

Did you just get the exhaust header wrap that you'd use on a high performance or turbo car? How does it handle it if some of the flame hits it? We are modifying our kettle this week and I could add that pretty easily if I order it.

Brandjes
07-24-2014, 10:09 AM
Yes. I got the wrap from the autoparts store. There is one spot that gets direct flame and it hasn't hurt it at all. The wrap makes a night and day difference

Brandjes
07-24-2014, 10:10 AM
Also. I doubled up the wrap because I had enough on the roll to do it.

DuelBrewing
08-08-2014, 08:53 AM
Ok, I'll jump in here.

We're using an electric Stout Tanks 3bbl system with controls by Ebrewsupply.

Things I've learned along the way:

Mash Tun is too small (already noted on an earlier post). We "modified" our mashtun by cutting it into pieces and welding it to a 7bbl tank we had originally intended to use as a Brite Beer tank.We now refer to it as FrankenTun.

HLT size in the beginning was a huge issue on multiple brew days, what I've moved to is using the BK and HLT to heat our initial water for the brewday. I use the BK for dough in, and the HLT for sparge, after sparge I immediately fill the HLT to half full and bring to a boil while the first brew of the day is boiling. During knock out I collect the hot water from our heat exchanger and top off the HLT getting us to temp for Dough in of brew two. After dough in of brew two I immediately fill the HLT to the sparge amount needed and bring to temp while mashing. We use this method to brew three batches in a day to fill our 10bbl fermenters. It's a long, long day.

I tried to use the RIMS system we bought from Stout and only frustrated myself (refer to conversation earlier about the false bottom allowing grains through), it now sits in a corner of the brewhouse awaiting repurposing of some sort that hasn't been thought of yet.

A note about multiple brews in a day, get a cold liquor tank that will house enough water for all your brews, it's the only way we can get through knockout quickly enough to make it all happen.

Hope this helps some.
Todd

Dred3
08-08-2014, 11:44 AM
For all practical purposes we have made our minds up regarding the system we are going for... The plan is to run the following:
Custom Hot Liquor Tank - more than double the standard Stout version to allow multiple batches and running our small pilot system from the same hot water source
Stout Insulated Mash Tun
Stout Insulated Domed Kettle with condensation stack
Possibly we'll get the new hop back / grant combo vessel
The electrical, heating & control items will be manufactured locally

What we would like to know is the lessons learnt by others to run a Stout system.

How are your vessels configured?
What hose configuration are you using?
Which pumps?
What chiller size?
Any tips and tricks you are willing to share?

Thanks in advance
Schalk



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I have been using a Stout system for about 6-7 months. Its a 3bbl direct fire. I started with 2 burners flanking the center drain pipe but didn't have a good boil they seem to be fighting each other for air. I am now using 1 and have wrapped the center pipe with header wrap for exhaust pipes. I have had 2 batches out of 45 burn or scorch from grain/hops/trub burning in the center pipe which transferred into beer leaving a burnt flavor. I then replaced the grant with my homebrew mash tun so I could use the mash screen to prevent grain from getting into kettle and burning. I also starting whirlpooling the wort with a chugger pump while its coming to a boil to prevent stuff from burning on the bottom. I have been using it to make beers ranging from 3.7%-10.5% I have had pretty good results thus far. The flat lid is kind of a pain when I cip but nothing to crazy. I also put the mash tun on cinder blocks so I could grain out easier.

StoutTanks
08-08-2014, 04:50 PM
I have been using a Stout system for about 6-7 months. Its a 3bbl direct fire. I started with 2 burners flanking the center drain pipe but didn't have a good boil they seem to be fighting each other for air. I am now using 1 and have wrapped the center pipe with header wrap for exhaust pipes. I have had 2 batches out of 45 burn or scorch from grain/hops/trub burning in the center pipe which transferred into beer leaving a burnt flavor. I then replaced the grant with my homebrew mash tun so I could use the mash screen to prevent grain from getting into kettle and burning. I also starting whirlpooling the wort with a chugger pump while its coming to a boil to prevent stuff from burning on the bottom. I have been using it to make beers ranging from 3.7%-10.5% I have had pretty good results thus far. The flat lid is kind of a pain when I cip but nothing to crazy. I also put the mash tun on cinder blocks so I could grain out easier.

Hi Dred3,

The chugger pump sounds like it is too small for 3 bbls - you might check out a bigger pump for whirlpooling. If the burners are lacking air, you need to look at giving them a bit more - call us if you have questions on how to go about that as well as perhaps discussing your vorlauf process.

Cheers,

John/Stout Tanks

Dred3
08-10-2014, 10:09 AM
Hi Dred3,

The chugger pump sounds like it is too small for 3 bbls - you might check out a bigger pump for whirlpooling. If the burners are lacking air, you need to look at giving them a bit more - call us if you have questions on how to go about that as well as perhaps discussing your vorlauf process.

Cheers,

John/Stout Tanks

The chugger pump is used just for moving wort from grant to kettle, I have a bigger pump for whirlpool. I have opened up the heat shields allowing more air for burners seems to work better. I do vorlauf for 10-15 min until wort is clear but found that using my home brew mash tun instead of grant keeps the little extra grain from getting into kettle. We are considering welding a heat shield around the center pipe to prevent direct heat and scorching of wort. AL.

gyropilot1
09-07-2014, 02:21 PM
I wonder with the hop basket the space for the heating elements is very short. This then means the element has to be order special from a source. also for a short length the Power will most likely be in the 2kwatts range.

Chuck

othevad
09-07-2014, 11:10 PM
Seems like maybe a deadish thread, but figured I could throw some input on here.

I have a 3bbl stout system, direct fire.

The biggest issues I currently have are efficiencies on multiple levels: extraction efficiencies from the mash tun (I usually run about 72%) and the lack of efficiency of direct fire burners on the bottom of the kettle.
I have 2 smallish burners (can't remember the btus, maybe 120 or 150k?) The biggest issues I find are not being able to make a beer above 20 plato og without using a bunch of sugar and the amount of time it takes to get to a boil (I've reconfigured the burners about 15 different times for different angles) My feeling about the BK geometry is that Stout might be better off making a kettle with a wider bottom for the direct fire systems so it doesn't take like 2 hours to get to a boil from mash out. Maybe a bit of a "stouter" tank would allow for more surface area to take on more heat from the burners directly without it taking so damn long to get it rolling. I've talked to a few other nanos in my region with the same system and they all report the same general amount of time to get their wort to a boil. Most (including myself) agree on about 1 hour 45 mins to 2 hours 15 mins to get it from knockout of the MT to boil.

As far as worrying about clogging HX's, use your grant while knocking out of the kettle to the fermenter. Knock out slow and the grant acts like a mini whirlpool to get residual hops/trub/proteins to settle out in the center of the grant. I also use an in-line strainer sometimes as long as it isn't overworking my pump by giving it feed deficiencies. I've been brewing for about 8 months now and using the grant pre-fermenter, I don't think I've backed up the HX in since I made the switch.

As far as pumps go , the March Nano pumps work pretty well, just make sure (with with the strainer) that you don't restrict the input *use 3/4-1inch id hose.

Besides the efficiency of working against the skinnyness of the BK, working around the cleanout pipe and dealing with a couple other odds and ends, I love the system for what it is.
Granted, it's limited, but if you know what you are doing you can make good beer and that's the most important thing.
If anyone has any questions about the Stout system and it's idiosyncracies (<spelling?) feel free to PM me.
be good

StoutTanks
09-08-2014, 11:23 AM
Hi Dave,

Thanks for your post. I would like to share some practices some of our other customers are doing to increase the mash efficiency.

Before I do, I'd like to say that we developed this system to provide a cost effective entry level brewing system - many of our customers buying 3 bbl systems have very limited budgets and we are trying to balance cost and performance. We do have our dome top kettle which has a 5" bigger diameter and we have also made brew kettles with bottoms that slope to a cleanout port and eliminate the center cleanout pipe.

Also, are you preheating the wort during sparge? That is a great way to speed up getting to boil.

A customer in South Carolina reports a 93% efficiency. Here are some notes I took from a recent call with them:

1. Use 5 or 6 pounds of rice hulls in the mash.
2. Big beers - use 1.1 quarts/pound of malt for mash in.
3. IPA uses 1.125 quarts/pound.
4. Increase the amount of sparge water to compensate for the drier mash
5. Do a 45 minute conversion rest
6. Then re-stir the mash all the way down to the bottom of the tun
7. Recirc again to set up the grain bed before sparging (this process eliminates channeling)

I believe in a previous discussion they mentioned that they recirculate during the entire mash process - but I'm not 100% sure on that.

I hope this is helpful.

Cheers,

John/Stout Tanks and Kettles

GallowsHillBrew
09-15-2014, 01:19 PM
Hi Dave. Thanks for the post. We will be using electric heating and according to my calcs we should be OK when it comes to rise times.

Thanks for the tips John... Pretty sure they will come in handy


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dantose
09-19-2014, 10:09 AM
No stout specific advice, but for brewery setup, make sure your floor is properly pitched before you put any equipment in. Pooling away from drains sucks to deal with and once everything is set up, you are kinda stuck with the situation.

GallowsHillBrew
09-22-2014, 09:27 AM
@ dantose
That is the first thing we did... Ripped out the old floor and installed a sloped setup with serious floor drains


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Wernerbrewer
11-07-2017, 11:45 AM
Any new words of wisdom from Stout 3-7BBL brewers out there? Would love to hear some more insight from experience and experimentation. Any major likes from the older style gear to the new?

Steve
Washington

chapusin
11-20-2017, 04:57 PM
Any new words of wisdom from Stout 3-7BBL brewers out there? Would love to hear some more insight from experience and experimentation. Any major likes from the older style gear to the new?

Steve
Washington

Put some exhaust insulation on the center out tube if you're using direct fire.

StoutTanks
11-20-2017, 05:08 PM
Put some exhaust insulation on the center out tube if you're using direct fire.

Our current designs for direct fire kettles do not have a center outlet pipe, so this isn't necessary any more. We slope to one side and the outlets are all external to the heated chamber area. There are 2 wort outlet ports (one includes a racking arm) and a lower cleanout port. We've also added additional heat shielding to better protect the direct fire burner components from the burner heat.

Electric kettles are a different design.

Ktown Brewer
11-20-2017, 06:34 PM
John - can you please describe how the design for the electric kettles differs? Thanks.


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