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billings
07-11-2006, 08:41 PM
After five plus years on concrete in rubber boots my feet are stomping mad. In the last six months as soon as I put on the boots my feet start to hurt. I have tried three to four different pairs to no avail. This not an ache but more like bruising on the heels and the bones all along the outside to the front of my feet.

My question is...what brand of boots are being worn? Which brand would you recommend? I am looking for the best boots available without trying all the different brands and styles out there.

Ouch Ouch,
Travis Zeilstra
Montana Brewing Co.

P.S. How did Cal Ripken play all those years without missing a game?

bndooley
07-11-2006, 09:08 PM
Have you tried insoles? I find Dr. Scholls to be really helpful.

You might consider talking to a podiatrist. They have all kinds of good advice.

Best of luck.

Ben Dooley
www.oldcrankybrewers.com

tarmadilo
07-11-2006, 10:29 PM
I got sick of gigantic, ill-fitting and smelly boots, so I started wearing these: L.L.Bean Storm Chasers... (http://www.llbean.com/shop/guidePages/stormChaser/index.html)

I figure it's well worth spending a little bit of money on shoes I wear all day at work!

Cheers, Tim

Michael Murphy
07-12-2006, 03:35 AM
a good solid work boot, leather, they last about 3 months , rubber boots go on if I have to do some heavy duty wet work.

scott isham
07-12-2006, 04:01 AM
Try this site. A little expensive, but worth the price. www.muckboots.com/homeandgarden.htm

Sir Brewsalot
07-12-2006, 07:15 AM
Just got a pair of these about a month ago, and they're serving me very well... free shipping both ways helps too, in case you get the wrong size.

http://www.zappos.com/n/p/p/7140725/c/238.html

RobZamites
07-12-2006, 07:20 AM
Well, I'll chime in too -- I wear Merrell Chameleons (http://www.merrell.com/Shop/Detail.aspx?NavID=FT-O-CHM&PID=9775). Gore-Tex, lightweight, and good traction.

beermaker
07-12-2006, 07:58 AM
I think we have tried every rubber boot out there and for the last few years we have been using the guardian 2 from shoes for crews, the fit is like a normal shoe, they have a slip resistant sole, a guarantee and the price is right.

beertje46
07-12-2006, 08:11 AM
I think we have tried every rubber boot out there and for the last few years we have been using the guardian 2 from shoes for crews, the fit is like a normal shoe, they have a slip resistant sole, a guarantee and the price is right.

The Guardian is now on sale:
http://www.shoesforcrews.com/sfc3/index.cfm?changeWebsite=US_en&route=c_store.viewDetailsOfProduct&partnumber=2050

I wear Birki's and find them great in the comfort and slip resistence areas. They are not steel-toed:
http://www.culinaryclassics.com/commerce/Product.asp?nclass=footwear:footwear%5Fbirkenstock %5Fpro&ProductCode=9401

Chris Garrett
07-12-2006, 02:25 PM
Same problem here... My feet were worked over by the concrete.

I bought some Keen Hood River Shoes for a basic non-slip brewery shoe. They are amazing on the feet!

http://gear.bootsnall.com/p/1969/KEEN-Hood-River.html

For chemical and hot liquid resistance situations, I wear Talon's from Grainger. They are cheap, but last and work very well!!! I put a Dr. Scholl's (sp?) insole in them and they killer.

http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/wwg/itemDetailsRender.shtml?ItemId=1611772503

Jephro
07-12-2006, 02:44 PM
Lacrosse work boots. Waterproof, Leather, Steel Toe, Slip Resistant, Very Comfortable. My feet stay dry, even after 5 months of hot water, chemicals, etc. and they are just broken in.
Great if you don't like muck boots!!

http://www.labsafety.com/search/default.htm?x=22&y=9&Ntx=mode%2Bmatchpartialmax&Ntt=lacrosse+work+boots&N=539+4294957935&Ntk=LSSSearch&dept_id=44003

Michael Murphy
07-12-2006, 02:56 PM
one time I bought these in the picture http://www.bjerregaard.dk/

they were dubbed "canada's toughest work shoe", they lasted 3 months the soles seperated from the shoe, the leather was all cracked to bits and the whole shoe became hard as a rock.

they set me back over 200 dollars as well. Just a cheap work boot to protect and replace when they get smelly, is all I need...

beerkeep
07-12-2006, 06:09 PM
Travis,

Try Muck boots, I have had great luck with them. You can get them at Tractor Supply in the Billings Heights. They are pricey about $75.

biz82
07-12-2006, 07:34 PM
This is by far the best Brewer's boot I've used, and I 've tried many. Unfortunately, it looks like they are being phased out. :mad:

http://www.lehighsafetyshoes.com/lehigh_shell.cfm?sectionname=footwear&pagename=individual&shoecatalognumber=15007490

kayemkerner
07-13-2006, 05:22 AM
I've used Blundstones "work" (steel-toed, hence the classification) boots my entire tenure...they're expensive only if you pay full price. Find a retailer for them and you'll find the glory of the once-a-year tent sale.

and to answer the post script for the original question: Ripkin played for as long as he did by using proper mechanics....and he subversively wanted to be Mike Schmidt, which is why he moved to third...

Hophead78
07-13-2006, 12:41 PM
I'm a big fan of RedBack Boots, very similar to the Blundstone. I oil them up every couple weeks and they do a fine job of keeping the feet dry, the soles are like walking on air and hold up well in the brewery. I've had this pair over a year and they look basically brand new when oiled. I even dropped acid on them with only a minor surface spotting. Check out this site www.aussiegeardirect.com I've had great success with them and their prices are really cheap.

Cheers
Dave

pbutlert
07-13-2006, 03:02 PM
Hi Travis, I have been wearing the Bata polyblend work shoes from Koch Supplies(www.kochsupplies.com) for at least 10 years, with arch support insoles for my flat feet. Steel toes, tough, and only $18 a pair. They last me about a year, and have a lower profile than your typical boot. Good Luck!

Ted Briggs
07-18-2006, 03:28 PM
Muck Boots rock!

imabrewer
07-20-2006, 11:23 AM
We use a brand of boot called "XTRATUFF", I'm not sure who makes them and I had a hard time finding them on the internet. But in Alaska they are sold everywhere and worn more than normal shoes and for brewing I've found they can't be beat. They are soft and flexible and easy on the ankles and shins. On the concrete floors, I still put in a heavy duty pair of Dr. Scholl's inserts to take out the shock of walking around on hard floors, but the boots work great otherwise. I tend to find that the top of the ankle of the boot wears out if you are crouching and climbing around under tanks a lot but otherwise no problems. They also have a great non-slip sole.

Wyrdbrew
07-20-2006, 06:05 PM
I used to wear pair of firemans boots. They are extremely comfortable and great protection but they are super heavy. The cost is substantial as well.

BelgianBrewer
07-20-2006, 09:35 PM
I feel rubber boots in a brewery can be dangerous. I once saw a Japanese brewer get his rubber boots filled with boiling wort and decided to set my boots aside. :eek:

I like http://shoesforcrews.com/ combined with waterproof socks (membrane - 100% waterproof and breathable porelle membrane) from SealSkinz http://www.sealskinz.com . You can litterally stand in 4 inches of water with these and still have perfectly dry feet.

BelgianBrewer
www.sbmbrew.com

kugeman
05-15-2007, 08:11 PM
Travis,
I'm looking for some new boots too. What did you end up buying? Do you like them?

steveg
05-18-2007, 10:15 AM
The best, most comfortable Brewers Rubber Boots I have ever used are Servus. Check out the website at:

www.servusproducts.com (http://)

These have a very comfortable insert and are not too bulky.

For day to day work not requiring rubber boots you just can't beat Doctor Martin's Work line for comfort and durability! Mine have steel toes and I can walk through puddles of caustic and acid with no issues.

wailingguitar
05-18-2007, 10:55 AM
These are expensive, but so worth it. They have been my favorites for a long time. They are comfortable, VERY flexible, and provide protection high up the calf. They fit snug around your calf preventing any 'oops just sprayed water into my shoe'... saw it happen with a hose from hot liquor tank.. very ugly... These would have prevented that...

http://www.gemplers.com/safety/personalprotection/safetyfootwear/chemicalboots/G32227.html

SRB
03-22-2010, 05:38 PM
Thanks Bham! I've been wearing these boots for 7 months now....LOVE EM'..PERFECT..Highly recommended. Gemplers was a fine retailer to buy them also. I have foot issues previous to my brewing dayzzz. IE any of you wide feet folks these work. American made...flexible and tough for sure. :)


These are expensive, but so worth it. They have been my favorites for a long time. They are comfortable, VERY flexible, and provide protection high up the calf. They fit snug around your calf preventing any 'oops just sprayed water into my shoe'... saw it happen with a hose from hot liquor tank.. very ugly... These would have prevented that...

http://www.gemplers.com/safety/personalprotection/safetyfootwear/chemicalboots/G32227.html

Larry Doyle
03-22-2010, 08:57 PM
I think you've got a lot of good suggestions for brewery footwear. It was a good question and it will help a lot of brewery workers.

Concerning Cal Ripken, playing all those consecutive games was an amazing feet. I read somewhere that he refused to wear regular baseball cleats. Instead, he wore ballet slippers while playing. He was loved by the press and they never pictured him below the knees.

kai
03-22-2010, 09:42 PM
I feel rubber boots in a brewery can be dangerous. I once saw a Japanese brewer get his rubber boots filled with boiling wort and decided to set my boots aside. :eek:

I know this is an old post, but...

It's much safer to wear your trouser legs on the OUTSIDE of your gumboots. It looks dicky and your pants get soggy and sometimes boots are just too big for your pants leg, but it can save you from a world of pain.

KevinECB
03-23-2010, 04:01 PM
ive only experienced two of these boosts...the Graingers is the company standard here...they are nice i like them...but definitely invest in some in soles. the pair i have right now have lasted 8 months of forty hour weeks running constantly, they can still go longer but both feet have a crack near the top of the foot...typically doesn't cause problems but im going to replace them for extra protection (boiling water)

ive also seen a few co-workers switch to the Gemmlers, they swear by them, but still always complain about foot ache, and they slip so many times i swear im watching Penguin bloopers.. i will not be making the switch

nickfl
11-23-2010, 09:44 PM
I like to go with cheap boots and expensive insoles. I have been using these https://www.bunzlpd.com/product.php?productid=87601&cat=990010&page=1 They are cheap and functional, but they need insoles.

Dr. Scholls are decent, but if you go to a podiatrist and get custom insoles made, you will never look back. They are expensive but they are 1000 times better than the cut-to-fit gel insoles and they last forever. Plus you can put them in even the cheapest boot and turn it into something you can stand in all day long.

South County
11-23-2010, 11:08 PM
Muck boot Chores, Only pair Ive used for wet and wearing for long periods of time, but very comfortable and warm when needed, not overly warm in the summer. A little on the doppy side but great so far.

jray
11-24-2010, 05:20 AM
I've worn XtraTuf boots since I worked in Alaska and still swear by them. I have only been able to find them at McMaster-Carr out here. Look for neoprene boots. The tops can be rolled down around the ankle for comfort.

http://www.mcmaster.com/#rubber-boots/=9uug9o

Roger Greene
11-24-2010, 08:44 AM
I have found Servus steel-toe wellies are comfortable enough to wear all day (with good socks). They also have great traction.

http://www.workgearonline.com/s75109/Servus-XTP-Steel-Toe-Hi-Boot.htm

schmogger
11-24-2010, 03:37 PM
I have used Baffin Boots for many years. They have gel injected into the heel of the boot and there is also a gel layer between the sole and the boot. They are very comfortable. Baffin made boots for the oil industry so they are also built very well. The first pair I found was at REI of all places. I hope this helps.

SRB
05-20-2011, 01:32 PM
Xtratuf boot update:
FAIL! So bummed......I LOVE the comfort of these boots! LOVE. But 1.5 years in service and the main crease point on the top of the boot, at the ankle joint has developed a water leaking tear! Also, one boot in particular (I imagine a right handed issue, ie hose etc getting dragged on that side of body predominately) has lots of scuffing that has exposed underlying layers beneath brown neoprene. This has not caused leaking and I am actually not concerned about it, but it has caught my attention.

Gempler's and the manufacturer have a 1 year warranty so SOL for me.
Lot o' coin to drop on a boot that can fail so quickly.
I have nerve issues in my feet that demand a comfortable boot, and the tuf's super flexible neoprene were so great for that, but damn.

:mad:

GlacierBrewing
05-21-2011, 08:02 AM
I think I may have found my new favorite brewhouse boots. They are waterproof, ankle-high boots by Carhartt. So far, I love 'em but I'll continue the torture test and let the forum know (hmmmmm, maybe I could get a sponsorship from Carhartt?)
Prost!
Dave

liammckenna
05-22-2011, 08:28 AM
Xtratuf boot update:

Lot o' coin to drop on a boot that can fail so quickly.
I have nerve issues in my feet that demand a comfortable boot, and the tuf's super flexible neoprene were so great for that, but damn.

:mad:

A year and a half is 'quickly'??? I go through about three pairs of boots a year. I prefer rubbers. I think Schmogger got it right with the Baffins. They also make a sole designed specifically for wet environments which works great - the boot model is called 'Grippers'. I think you can get them through acklands-grainger.

I had a pair of boots last about a year once but from the stink, you'd have thought they were alive. Don't know what happened to those boots. Perhaps they walked out on their own.

:D

Pax.

Liam

SRB
05-23-2011, 11:27 AM
A year and a half is 'quickly'??? I go through about three pairs of boots a year............


:eek: wow! That just made my drained bank account jiggle and shake for loose change.

These xtratufs are "known" to last 5+ seasons on Alaska crabbing boats.
They don't deal with chemicals and heat, but from the episodes of Deadliest Catch I have watched,and talking with friends who have crabbed, it is a brutal environment. IE if a boot can last that long there why not in my brewery?

liammckenna
05-23-2011, 02:45 PM
The heat mainly, I guess.

After about four months, boots and I generally need to part company.

Gold Bond foot powder helps.

It eventually loses out though :eek:

Perhaps it's just my foot 'flora', and not everyones.

I must say, I don't mind spending $80 three times a year to protect my feet and ensure I have good frictional contact with the surface I'm walking on.

I used to.

After more than a few bouts of physio for various twists and sprains over the first 10 years of my 25 years in brewing now, my perspective changed.

More frequent new boots are cheaper. Especially if you, like me, prefer rubbers.

While this thread is informative and entertaining, I cannot overemphasize the importance of good, comfortable, protective, supportive footwear with good grip.

Boots (especially soles) don't last forever.

In our place, it is our policy that you must always have effective non-slip shoes if you are employed here. No high heels either.

We are only a sizeable brewpub but the rule refers to the staff in the kitchen, FOH, brewery, maintenance, janitorial.. basically everyone.

The litigious nature of our society requires such a policy and it should be policed and enforced.

For everyones protection.

Pax.

Liam

Jephro
05-23-2011, 03:30 PM
My "Timberland Pro Titan XL" leather boots are about 2 years old now and still going strong. Slip resistant, oil resistant, Chem resistant, water-proof, Steel-toe, Nylon shanks & leather uppers < $130.00 and very comfortable to-boot (oh yes I did).

My old pair of Timberland Pro's (3.5 years now) smell like an old grain can but are great backup boots and are still waterproof. The black abrasion resistant toe caps prevent the typical splitting at the sole too.

Oh, and the "high heels" on these boots save my ass on a regular baisis as i can lock the heel onto the slick SS cheese grader steps when decending from the Brewhouse Platform. I personally wouldn't even consider boots that did not have heels on them. But that's me.

My 2 year Timberlands:
I know, they need some oil...:o
6613

kai
05-24-2011, 05:16 AM
My boots last me a minimum of six months, depending on the make. They would last a lot longer if they got hosed off at the end of every shift and polished once a week, but they don't.

If you think about it, a brewery is a pretty damned inhospitable environment for a pair of boots. As well as hot liquor and caustic, beer and (especially) wort are not friendly to leather, as the sugars provide a nice substrate for rot. And that's on top of being just plain wet all day.

My boots always go first by developing cracks in the leather by the toe joint. Then it's a race between buying new ones and spilling something hot on one's foot.

I've also learned the importance of a pair of good-fitting boots after developing a metatarsal stress fracture in my left foot; the product of only ever working in jobs that involve feet, concrete floors and sometimes less than ideal footwear.

ellicott mills
07-05-2011, 12:30 PM
Worx model no. 5803 by Redwing. Cordura nylon that caustic can't eat. Good sole for concrete. Safety toe, steel shank, great construction. A pair of these and some kevlar boot laces are my favorites.

Justin Viale
10-24-2012, 06:09 PM
Just bumping this thread to get some updated info from the community.

I'm just finishing up another 6 months and another search for boots.

Back in February, I bought a pair of Wolverine Swamp Monster 10" Pull-On Wellington boots. They were great for the time they lasted. Things I need in a boot. For sure water-proof-ness. The pull-on was nice, my morning routine down to a speedy few minutes without the need to lace up my boots. But most importantly was the availability of wide sizes. With my feet, narrow boots always blow out the sides around the balls of my feet.

Anyway, for 80 bucks, I'm considering getting another pair, but I'm just wondering if anyone has found a magic cure-all for getting boots to last more than 6 months.

troybinso
10-24-2012, 06:24 PM
I'm on the hunt for some new boots too. My steel-toed Muck Boots were great, until they weren't. Little cracks on the top of the boot let enough liquid in to get pretty moist socks by the end of the day. You'd think there would be a definitive brewer's boot, but I guess each foot is different.

scott isham
10-25-2012, 07:13 AM
These are the best I've found:
https://www.shoesforcrews.com/sfc3/index.cfm?changeWebsite=US_en&route=c_store.viewDetailsOfProduct&partnumber=5004

They're not steel-toe which is the only drawback, but I've had mine for almost two years now with very little wear showing. There very non-slip and very comfortable and light. They're kind of like croc boots. If they made these with a steel-toe, they would be the best brewer boots ever. Very cheap as well!

Kev7555
10-26-2012, 11:38 PM
I too have tired of uncomfortable, ill fitting rubber boots. Just recently I have taken to wearing my $200 Salomon hiking boots in the brewery. The most comfortable boots I've ever owned and 100% waterproof. Never wet, never tiring to wear.

-Kev

Phil
10-27-2012, 04:09 AM
having read thru this entire thread, and agree with many, good insoles and see a foot-quack regularly, and decent boots...

I am really disapointed that not one comment toward Garter belt, and the mrs' undies...

c'mon... :p

Rosie
10-29-2012, 02:28 PM
I've been using the Muck Boot Chore (mid height) (thanks to recommendations here) for the last six months and must say that it is the most comfortable boot I've worn so far...a pleasure to put on in the morning...though some constructive feedback:

* I didn't have the opportunity to by the steel toed version...though mine have a tough toe, not the best where the opportunity to drop kegs or pallets on feet
* They don't have the best slip resistance...there are some worn areas of my floor that I need to take care on.

With EVERY boot I've tried and sock regimes, my boots still get wet inside...maybe just sweaty feet. I now use a ski boot dryer on my boots after every session and it has made a huge difference to the aroma and longevity of the boots and to my happiness level on putting on the boots in the morning, so I can highly recommend every brewer do the same.

Cheers,
Jeff

Kev7555
11-01-2012, 09:10 PM
OK, OK.......I DID wear her panties under my long johns in the brewery one day and actually wore the ex's teddy onstage once, but that's the extent of it.

beer_gorilla
02-19-2013, 11:33 AM
these once great boots are now made in china. my original pair were champs, great brewery boots. the next pair i got were conspicuously missing the MADE IN USA on the front. a little research showed they are now made in China (also says so on the sole now). long story short, i have gone thru this pair in a couple months (usually get 6-8 months of daily wear, 8-10 hrs/day). the liner on the inside has degraded, now the bare rubber pulls my socks down and rubs holes in them. (as mentioned previously, wear good socks! worth the extra prices, but annoying as hell when your boots eat them). i've suspected they were leaking for a while and today, as i sit here w/ soaking wet socks, i can confirm this.

sad...they used to be great. now i am definitely looking elsewhere (muckboots, baffins, guardians, servus)

oh yeah...the thing that really pisses me off is they are now made in china (according to the company to save costs) but they still are the same price (if not higher) to us. BS in my book.

timbro81
02-19-2013, 07:37 PM
Not cheap but comfortable and pretty bomb-proof so far. http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=muck+wetland&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=3856014741&hvpos=1t3&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=2454283351125440673&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&ref=pd_sl_71hjnvmaug_b

Matt Dog
02-19-2013, 10:31 PM
A little Baking Soda in the boots a couple X a week cuts down on the "StinkFoot". And those cheap antimicrobial inserts at Walmart seem to help.

kugeman
02-20-2013, 07:58 AM
I've had a couple pairs of muckboots and I'd actually have to recommend against them in the brewery. They just don't hold up very well over time. They are very comfortable (which is why I'm on my 3rd pair) but the steel-toed version (which I currently have) develops leaks and splits in the rubber bottoms fairly quickly. I have to replace my current pair after only 6 months, and for $100 a pair I expect longer life than that. Also if you have any sort of wet or slippery floor problems then they are definitely not a good choice. After the bottoms get "broken-in" a bit (like after 2 months or so) the muckboots provide very little slip resistance. In fact I slip in them more than I do in just a regular pair of work boots.

Like I said, they are very comfortable, and they tops roll-down, which is great in summer. If you do buy them, I would not get the steel toed boots, they definitely broke the quickest.

CedarCreek
02-20-2013, 08:03 AM
I have to agree on the Muck boots. I have the steel toe Chore boots and they are very comfortable. After a 12 hour day my feet are fine. I just roll down the top to make them come up to mid calf height and they are perfect. They are more expensive but when you are on your feet 8-12 hours a day comfort is a big deal.

neil.corrigan12
10-22-2015, 01:06 PM
I'm a big fan of RedBack Boots, very similar to the Blundstone. I oil them up every couple weeks and they do a fine job of keeping the feet dry

Brandjes
10-22-2015, 01:47 PM
Just switched from Bogs food pro to Shoes for crews Bullfrog. The Bogs are way more comfortable but 3x the price and only lasted about 6 months before leaking. I might go back to bogs for the comfort... it is worth it

Sent from my SM-N900V using Tapatalk

mikeyrb1
10-22-2015, 02:19 PM
Another vote for Much boots here. We frequently, like today, work outside in the snow. Not complaining, we love it, but in the past our brew boots were so slick you couldn't stand up on snow and ice. It's dangerous, especially if you are carrying chemicals or heavy stuff, not that this job requires any of that. The soles on the Mucks are vibram and much better in the snow. Durability is good too. But yeah, they ain't cheep. Oh yeah, they are much more comfortable than the old green boots too, even before I switched the insoles out.

wailingguitar
01-10-2016, 07:17 PM
The above was a quote from beer_gorilla in his post #49. It just reinforces what I just posted in #57 and #58 regarding the quality of boots available in the US today. Gumleaf boots, on the other hand, are handmade in Europe. You won't find a better made boot. 85% natural rubber. Double reinforced seams. Air cushioned heels and forefoot, etc. If you work in a part of the brewery that requires steel toes or shanks, this isn't your boot but if you want comfort and durability, this is your new brand. See a SPECIAL OFFER I'm about to post under "Classifieds - New Product Opportunities". Men's retailer Sims used to say, "An educated consumer is our best customer." I'll take that a step further: "An educated brewmaster will be my best Gumleaf referral." Rather than my making claims about Gumleaf boots, I'm offering a financial incentive to put Gumleaf boots on the first 25 orders using the special discount code on the Classifieds page. I'll let the quality and comfort speak for themselves. Need new boots? Now would be a great time to buy Gumleaf.

I have submitted this question multiple times on other sites without an answer, maybe you can tell me here... I wear a 9EEEE and have a VERY hard time finding boots to fit. Do you have something that will fit me without being sloppy in length?

DusqoFDB
02-04-2016, 12:45 PM
Hey everyone. Been wearing these boots for just under three years and they have finally sprung a leak. Last brewery I worked for bought them for me but I can't for the life of me remember the brand. Don't have any obvious brand markings on them so I thought I would see if any of you have any idea what brand they are. Would love to get a replacement pair.
301473014830149

JustinL
02-06-2016, 07:30 PM
They look like the chemical resistant boots from mcmaster carr. I have the same pair sitting around. check their website.

Justin

DusqoFDB
02-14-2016, 04:57 PM
Yep. That looks like them. Thanks Justin.

MP-Greg
07-12-2016, 07:17 PM
If any one can help I'm looking at trying the shoes for crews guardian IV was wondering how the sizing is on them from those of you what have wore them

Adrenaline
08-03-2016, 08:06 PM
I use them and they are pretty good on sizing. I usually where a size 12 shoe and use a 12 with inserts and they fit well. A little loose without inserts but i wouldnt recommend going smaller. They may fit well a size down but youre way better off with the added comfort of inserts.

blonberg
09-26-2016, 02:12 PM
I'm a big believer in Red Wings for everything from shoes, to sandals, to boots. I've had my current pair of boots for 5 months, and aside from a little discoloration (slight darkening where they regularly get wet with chemicals), they are in near-brand-new condition.

http://www.redwingshoes.com/red-wing-shoe/2240-red-wing-shoes/2240-red-wing-mens-6-inch-boot-brown

They aren't cheap, but they are worth it. They have excellent support, are fully water- and chemical-proof, heat resistant (and don't get hot even in the worst of the summer), slip resistant, and are safe around electricity (non-steel toe, but they are composite, which should handle anything in a brewhouse that doesn't use a forklift).

Jeremiah
02-26-2017, 06:54 AM
Did a little contract work for another brewery and saw these on the headbrewers feet, he swore by them.

https://www.brewboots.com/

44595

GraniteFalls
05-30-2017, 12:32 PM
Did a little contract work for another brewery and saw these on the headbrewers feet, he swore by them.

https://www.brewboots.com/

44595

I ordered mine from the first production run. I've tried pretty much every other brand and never had anything last longer than 9 months, with most leaking long before that. I've had my Brew Boots for just short of a year, and the sole on one has just started to separate from the body, but they STILL don't leak!
They are also comparably very lightweight, the shock absorption is excellent, and they don't stink after a year of wearing every day. I've recommended them to all my brewer friends, I really hope this company sells enough to stick around, because I'll not be buying anything else.

Joseph Ackerman
Head Brewer, Granite Falls Brewing Co.

GumLeaf USA
09-29-2017, 05:45 AM
I'm just finishing up another 3 months and another search for boots. But did not found any Boots but now i'm still waiting .I hope i will find best boots ,actually i love the Reebok company boots.

"Gumleaf USA offers incredibly comfortable and well-made boots: 85% natural rubber, air-filled soft rubber chambers under the heel and forefoot, handmade in Europe. They have an aggresive, non-slip tread also. What they do not have is a steel shank or so if you don't require either, give our boots a try. You won't find a more comfortable, better made boot on the planet."

blonberg
10-26-2017, 12:35 PM
these once great boots are now made in china. my original pair were champs, great brewery boots. the next pair i got were conspicuously missing the MADE IN USA on the front. a little research showed they are now made in China (also says so on the sole now). long story short, i have gone thru this pair in a couple months (usually get 6-8 months of daily wear, 8-10 hrs/day). the liner on the inside has degraded, now the bare rubber pulls my socks down and rubs holes in them. (as mentioned previously, wear good socks! worth the extra prices, but annoying as hell when your boots eat them). i've suspected they were leaking for a while and today, as i sit here w/ soaking wet socks, i can confirm this.

sad...they used to be great. now i am definitely looking elsewhere (muckboots, baffins, guardians, servus)

oh yeah...the thing that really pisses me off is they are now made in china (according to the company to save costs) but they still are the same price (if not higher) to us. BS in my book.

What are your sock recommendations?

Stephbaker
12-19-2018, 01:57 AM
Try this site. A little expensive, but worth the price. www.muckboots.com/homeandgarden.htm

looks interesting. Thanks for the site. I liked a pair. They are on the expensive end but they seem worth it

A.R.Brewing
04-07-2019, 11:17 PM
I have been wearing Tingley boots for about 4 years now very comfortable and durable as all get out. I currently am wearing the Flite boots have been wearing them since January I cant recommend them enough.

RobertColianni
07-05-2019, 10:22 PM
Has anybody tried the Crocs AllCast Rain Boots? I wear Carolina boots, now, but they seem to be wet after the second day of each week.