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I.D. Rinks
12-19-2006, 08:54 AM
Help: We have been asked to supply beer for food processing (cooking with in large quantities).

1. How do I reduce my manufacturing costs (process, ingridents)?
2. Anybody ever make fake beer?
3. How about shipping in bulk (stability)?

Thanks

I.D. Rinks

Michael Murphy
12-19-2006, 09:48 AM
perhaps you can find a local brewery to brew you some wort and you can take it away for cooking. worts are very good for cooking with, you wont have to pay for the beer cost because it hasnt taken time away from fermentation tank, it also has all the sugars and no alc which, but all the beer flavors from the malts. and hops if you ask for it hopped.

GeorgeJ
12-19-2006, 12:25 PM
perhaps you can find a local brewery to brew you some wort and you can take it away for cooking. worts are very good for cooking with, you wont have to pay for the beer cost because it hasnt taken time away from fermentation tank, it also has all the sugars and no alc which, but all the beer flavors from the malts. and hops if you ask for it hopped.
but it wouldnt taste the same? it'd taste horrid and too sweet

plus, the alcohol has good properties for cooking with. i.e. 'de-glazing' a pan.

i cooked steak and kidney pudding with our best bitter on sunday, and the alcohol content went fantastically to remove all the fats and flavours from the bottom of the pan, and gave the beer flavour.

GeorgeJ - Dark Star Brewery

rudge75
12-19-2006, 02:02 PM
George makes some excellent points.

Keep in mind, you're not going to make good food from crap beer. This is your chance to educate the buyer and put your best foot forward. There's so many similarities here to wine making and cooking with wine. If your product has off-flavours (from rushed fermentation or what have you) you'll just be concentrating those in the cooking process. Cook with what you'd like to drink.

Every time I've sent beer for cooking use (breads, rib boiling, etc.), I've sent out flat, relatively clear beer from the conditioning tank. This was easier for those doing the processing to handle, unless they were using the co2 in the beer as a leavening agent, in which case, they bought bottles. If you're doing this, you could do the "bag in box" format and fill the bags from your conditioning tank.

I do believe that the Canadian Federal Excise Tax act gives you some direction as to tax breaks for food process beer. I believe it's taxed at a lower rate, if at all. There's your savings right there.

If I were you, I'd be striking some kind of deal to get the name of your brewery/beer on the food product in question to promote your name/brand further.