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View Full Version : Is our filter even close to big enough? Is it even an appropriate filter?



Ajchocholousek
04-02-2018, 10:47 AM
Hi all - I just took over at a brewpub here in MN. I'm no expert on water filters, but I'm 99% sure the water filter that was here is not nearly big enough. We are a 10bbl brewhouse, putting out about 1500 bbl/yr.

This is our current filter: https://www.geapplianceparts.com/store/parts/spec/GXWH20S

It just seems to be a cheap, household thing. I replace the filters every three months, but the packaging says "tested. . .at a flow rate of 4gpm to a capacity of 700 gallons for the reduction of chlorine taste and odor." We use 700 gallons in less than three batches...

This doesn't seem right to me. "Reduction"? How about removal? I've started investigating as I have been picking up crappy (what I think is) chlorophenol notes in our hoppy beers. Does anyone have any thoughts and/or advice? I've never had to deal with this side of a brewery before.

For reference our city water report shows the highest quarterly average for chlorine (via chloramine) at 0.88ppm with a monthly mean fluctuation of 0.57-0.97ppm.

Thanks in advance!

2dogzbrewing
04-02-2018, 12:40 PM
undersized, the replacement filters will handle about 25,000 to 30,000 gallons before replacement is needed.

BrewinLou
04-02-2018, 12:54 PM
I highly recommend buying a unit properly sized. I would suggest a mineral tank like one of these...https://www.ohiopurewater.com/categories/?categories_id=363 filled with GAC (granulated activated carbon) and a Fleck valve on top. Get one that back flushes on a 24 hour timers. Get with a water softener provider in your area for advice. The guys came in and helped us get it set up. Cheers.

Ajchocholousek
04-02-2018, 01:06 PM
I highly recommend buying a unit properly sized. I would suggest a mineral tank like one of these...https://www.ohiopurewater.com/categories/?categories_id=363 filled with GAC (granulated activated carbon) and a Fleck valve on top. Get one that back flushes on a 24 hour timers. Get with a water softener provider in your area for advice. The guys came in and helped us get it set up. Cheers.

So, you would agree that it is, indeed, undersized, correct? I'm wondering if it is doing anything at all. The chlorine test kit that was here when I started is 5 years expired, but showed no chlorine when I took a sample. I'm guessing that the reagent is not working because of it's age.

Another question: would chloramine show up on a chlorine test kit? Does it manifest as available chlorine?

2dogzbrewing
04-03-2018, 07:08 AM
So, you would agree that it is, indeed, undersized, correct? I'm wondering if it is doing anything at all. The chlorine test kit that was here when I started is 5 years expired, but showed no chlorine when I took a sample. I'm guessing that the reagent is not working because of it's age.

Another question: would chloramine show up on a chlorine test kit? Does it manifest as available chlorine?

Yes you can use a Chlorine test kit to test for Chloramine. I would suggest getting a Water Treatment Company in there to set up the correct system for you. I have a 1000 gallon a day reverse osmosis system that I brew with and store 1000 gallons of water.. The right water makes all the difference in the world...

Ajchocholousek
04-03-2018, 11:11 AM
Definitely. We have good water here in town, in general, aside from the chloramine at .87ppm average. Very very low mineral content.

Unfortunately, we aren't in a spot to spend a lot of money all at once right now. I'm considering adding one or two more of these same filters in line...that'd only cost about $80.

If anything exists under $500 that anyone knows about, let me know!

BuckeyeHydro
04-15-2018, 03:23 AM
This is our current filter: https://www.geapplianceparts.com/store/parts/spec/GXWH20S

It just seems to be a cheap, household thing. I replace the filters every three months, but the packaging says "tested. . .at a flow rate of 4gpm to a capacity of 700 gallons for the reduction of chlorine taste and odor." We use 700 gallons in less than three batches...

This doesn't seem right to me. "Reduction"? How about removal? I've started investigating as I have been picking up crappy (what I think is) chlorophenol notes in our hoppy beers. Does anyone have any thoughts and/or advice? I've never had to deal with this side of a brewery before.

For reference our city water report shows the highest quarterly average for chlorine (via chloramine) at 0.88ppm with a monthly mean fluctuation of 0.57-0.97ppm.

Thanks in advance!
The link you provided is to a 10" x 2.5" (nominal) SEDIMENT FILTER. This has nothing to do with treating chlorine. But then you mention spec's for the removal of chlorine, so I suspect you have put a super low end CARBON FILTER into that housing. And yes, that is incredibly undersized for your application.

Next you mention that you have chloramine in your tapwater. This fact makes your existing filter even that much more undersized. Look at the chart on this page for the type of equipment you should consider: http://www.buckeyehydro.com/backwashing-chloramine-removal-tanks/
Treatment of water containing chloramines requires a greater residence time than is needed for treating water with chlorine. So our chloramine removal systems are larger (contain more treatment media), and they contain CGAC rather than GAC. CGAC is a special type of carbon that is especially fast-acting.

Russ

BuckeyeHydro
04-15-2018, 03:25 AM
Another question: would chloramine show up on a chlorine test kit? Does it manifest as available chlorine?

You'd need to test for TOTAL CHLORINE, and for FREE CHLORINE. The difference between the two is your chloramines.

Russ

BuckeyeHydro
04-15-2018, 03:43 AM
Unfortunately, we aren't in a spot to spend a lot of money all at once right now. I'm considering adding one or two more of these same filters in line...that'd only cost about $80.

If anything exists under $500 that anyone knows about, let me know!

Well, your only option if you can't afford the appropriate equipment is to modify your water use. By that, I mean if all you can afford at this point is a cartridge style filter, you will need to slow the flow of water through the filter to something that can receive adequate treatment. The largest of the four standard size cartridge filters is 20" x 4.5". http://www.buckeyehydro.com/backwashing-chloramine-removal-tanks/
You'd want to keep the flow through that filter down around 2 gpm to give you a margin of safety. You'll need a housing, bracket, and screw set for this new filter. I strongly recommend you not buy another of what you already have - it's the SMALLEST of the four standard size cartridge filters.

At most, the 20" x 4.5" would last you about 10 weeks, given your stated water use.

That's the issue with trying to make do with undersized equipment... you avoid the upfront $ investment, but you'll go broke buying replacement filters, and you'll have less than ideal performance (slow throughput).

Russ

Ajchocholousek
04-16-2018, 08:34 AM
Thanks a bunch Russ. You've confirmed what i've been suspecting. I'll give you guys a call today.