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View Full Version : Electric Nanos - what percentage rate are you boiling at?



somenerve
06-20-2018, 07:11 AM
Just curious as to what kind of boil rate people are using on small systems (especially if you happen to be running a 3-bbl system which is what we have). We're running at 60% and don't seem to be getting as lot of boil-off (only like 2-3 gallons from a batch). Should I bump that up a bit?

rdcpro
06-20-2018, 12:47 PM
Just curious as to what kind of boil rate people are using on small systems (especially if you happen to be running a 3-bbl system which is what we have). We're running at 60% and don't seem to be getting as lot of boil-off (only like 2-3 gallons from a batch). Should I bump that up a bit?

No one can answer your question with the information you provided. If you have 10 KW of electric heat and you're running 60%, that's 6 KW. If you have 20 KW of heat, and you run 60%, that's 12 KW. 12 KW into 3bbl of wort is going to be a lot different than 6 KW into the same size.

In general, adjust your system to get the boiloff rate you want. If 60% is not enough to get there, increase it. If you get carmelization or burning on the elements before you get to the level where your boiloff is good, you've got a problem, because your watt density is too high.

Regards,
Mike Sharp

somenerve
06-20-2018, 01:26 PM
No one can answer your question with the information you provided. If you have 10 KW of electric heat and you're running 60%, that's 6 KW. If you have 20 KW of heat, and you run 60%, that's 12 KW. 12 KW into 3bbl of wort is going to be a lot different than 6 KW into the same size.

In general, adjust your system to get the boiloff rate you want. If 60% is not enough to get there, increase it. If you get carmelization or burning on the elements before you get to the level where your boiloff is good, you've got a problem, because your watt density is too high.

Regards,
Mike Sharp

Thanks Mike! I totally spaced the wattage factor. For the record, we're running 22 KW (4 * 5500).
I put the same question to Tyler at Stout Tanks and he was kind enough to send me a link with an Excel worksheet for computing boil-off. Comes in very handy!

augiedoggy
06-21-2018, 06:43 AM
Thanks Mike! I totally spaced the wattage factor. For the record, we're running 22 KW (4 * 5500).
I put the same question to Tyler at Stout Tanks and he was kind enough to send me a link with an Excel worksheet for computing boil-off. Comes in very handy!

can you share the spreadsheet? we have the same kettle with 4 5500w elements but havent brewed with it yet.

EDIT Nevermind, I found it. according to the spreadsheet , if you boild for even just an hour at 60% you should be seeing 5.5 gallons of boil off not 2 or 3 unless im reading it wrong?

somenerve
06-21-2018, 06:49 AM
Oops - sorry - I meant to include the link in my previous post. Here it is:

https://conical-fermenter.com/Electric-Brewing-Percent-Setting-Worksheet.html

rdcpro
06-22-2018, 09:41 AM
Thanks Mike! I totally spaced the wattage factor. For the record, we're running 22 KW (4 * 5500).
I put the same question to Tyler at Stout Tanks and he was kind enough to send me a link with an Excel worksheet for computing boil-off. Comes in very handy!

One thing I can think of that can cause your numbers to be low is the actual voltage you're running the elements at. If they are rated 5500 watts at 240 volts, they will produce significantly less power if you're running them on a 208 volt wye electrical system, which is common in an industrial setting. A wattage rating is only relevant at a particular voltage. I don't know what yours are, though. I'm guessing they're similar to standard 5500 watt water elements, which are probably rated at 240V.

If you have access to a clamp-on ammeter, you can measure the current to each of the elements, and measure the voltage across each one. Then you can figure out the actual wattage under your conditions. If these are simple single phase elements, you use this formula:

P = I * E
or,
power (watts) = current (amps) * voltage (volts)

Three phase power uses a different formula. If you want to measure the panel as a whole, you need to figure out how the elements are connected, and it's much more complicated than measuring each one, and adding them up.

It goes without saying to be careful making this measurement, and it should be done by a qualified person.

Regards,
Mike Sharp

madcowbrewing
07-11-2018, 01:24 PM
We run 100% until we hit the boil. Then we run through the break (about 10 min) then turn down to about 80-85. We are running 2 x 5500 watt elements.