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Too much calcium causing foaming beer?

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  • Too much calcium causing foaming beer?

    The problem: at 2.3 vols of CO2, beer is pouring foamy.
    my theory: either there is too much calcium in my water profile causing the CO 2 molecules come out of solution in the line. Or a higher moisture content of the particular grain is causing the forced CO2 out in the line. Any help on this matter is much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Serving from kegs? Brite tanks? How long is the draw? What is the temperature of the beer? How much pressure on the keg/brite tank? There are a LOT of variables here and I sincerely doubt it's due to calcium content (BTW, how high is it?) or moisture content of the grain.

    When CO2 breaks out in a delivery line it's usually a pressure issue; that is, the pressure on the tap line is less than that required to keep the CO2 from breaking out.

    Cheers,
    --
    Don
    Idyllwild Brewpub

    Comment


    • FreshCoastHB
      FreshCoastHB commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for all of the hints, we have figured out the problem. ultimatly it was not enough head pressure on the kegs and co2 was coming out of solution before it hit our beer pumps. We were thinking backwards do to how we previously would run draft lines with gas pressure.

  • #3
    How much calcium do you have in your feedwater?
    Probrewer.com Advertising Supporter

    Buckeye Hydro
    Water Treatment Systems & Supplies
    www.BuckeyeHydro.com
    Info@buckeyehydro.com
    513-312-2343

    Comment


    • FreshCoastHB
      FreshCoastHB commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for all of the hints, we have figured out the problem. ultimatly it was not enough head pressure on the kegs and co2 was coming out of solution before it hit our beer pumps. We were thinking backwards do to how we previously would run draft lines with gas pressure.

  • #4
    Assuming you’ve checked all the other common cuplpirts like keg temp, draft line temp, properly sized draft lines, and confirmed your beer isn’t over carbed etc. Then the telltale signs of inadequate pressure are bubbles or air pockets in your beer line. The lack of sufficient pressure is allowing dissolved CO2 to come out of suspension in the line before it hits the tap.

    In theory, dirty lines can cause foaming, but chances are you most likely have something else at work. A beer line concern is the accumulation of mineral deposits within the lines, shanks and faucets. “beer stone” and it can be difficult to remove. If caustic beer line cleaner doesn’t remove it, it may be time to replace your lines.

    With some troubled lines I’ve always had luck using a flow-control faucet to restrict the flow rate. It will take longer to pour, but is effective.

    Cheers,

    Steven
    Marks design & Metalworks

    Comment


    • BuckeyeHydro
      BuckeyeHydro commented
      Editing a comment
      Question for you Steve - mineral deposits in the lines would presumably be... scale/hardness. Wouldn't an acid be a more effective cleaner?

    • FreshCoastHB
      FreshCoastHB commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for all of the hints, we have figured out the problem. ultimatly it was not enough head pressure on the kegs and co2 was coming out of solution before it hit our beer pumps. We were thinking backwards do to how we previously would run draft lines with gas pressure.
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